Anatomy of a fake watch movement

Thread: Anatomy of a fake watch movement

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  1. #1
    Member JohnR's Avatar
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    Anatomy of a fake watch movement - pics

    So here are the long awaited pics of the movement from inside my fake CA. The dad of one of the guys I work with works at a local jewelry store and does watch repair and offered to put the broken second hand back on for free, so I headed down there, camera in hand. I was trying to get the balance between wanting to take 100 pictures and not annoying him with that desire. He did set the watch down a few times so I could try and get a better pic of it. The lighting wasn't the best, so these pics aren't quite the quality of my other ones, but here you go.

    First off, I timed the watch and it was running about 30sec slow/day.

    So he gets the cas back off and we see this somewhat decorated movement with the Breitling name, etc on it. His first thought was that I had a real watch. I quickly dismissed this possibility as it obviously made no sense to put a real movement in a fake watch. Then after a little more looking he decided that it was obviously fake because of the lack of serial number (or some sort of number) on the bridge (or somewhere in there where he said it was supposed to be). He said that it was a Chinese copy of a Valjoux 7750. Why they went to the trouble to somewhat decorate the rotor I have no idea. I guess thats just the quality of the fake. Maybe someone would get inside and if they didn't have the knowledge of a watchmaker might be convinced that it was real. One of the other guys that worked there had a horrible fake SuperAvenger that he popped open and it had a blank movement held in place with the plastic movement holder. Mine atleast made an attempt at appearing real.

    He said that the real movements are very easy to work on, but that this one gave him a bit of trouble. He said if you take these apart too much that you'll never get them back together because they'll just fall apart. He was eventually able to get it out and get the hand back on and get the watch back together.

    I asked him what he thought the watch was made out of. He said "base metal," which I guess is just a cheap metal. He said it would dent and pit and stuff.

    Ok, so here are the pics.

    First, here is a link to a picture of the real thing off of TZ:
    Movement Picture


    And the pics of my fake.



    Last edited by JohnR; February 11th, 2006 at 13:39.

  2. #2
    Member JohnR's Avatar
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    Re: Anatomy of a fake watch movement

    no comments on my high quality fake watch movement?


    After being put back on, the hand subsequently fell back off. Ah the joys of owning a fakeO|

    John

  3. #3
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    Re: Anatomy of a fake watch movement

    i think the "Chinmiographe cemopie Chinsement" would have indicated that it wasn't the real movement more than a lack of number on the bridge.. They definitely want you to know that it is Chinese.

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  5. #4
    Pil-Mil, Breitling Forum Moderator O2AFAC67's Avatar
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    Re: Anatomy of a fake watch movement

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnR
    Comments on my high quality fake watch movement?
    Geeeeeeeeez.... , John. That's one life lesson we would have all been better off without having to learn. I mean, the whole fraudulent premise of the endeavour is nauseating. Nothwithstanding the monetary loss you suffered (and all the accompanying stress and procedural grief) at least you can get on down the road now with all that BS behind you. Chalk it up to an educational life experience you'll never repeat. I could hearten you somewhat by relating MUCH worse boners I've pulled but I can't afford to give googoo any more free fodder for commentary. LOL. Cheers,
    Ron


    " The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With The Sea "


    Click to view: 500px Photo Gallery or... Breitling Pics Slideshow

  6. #5
    Member JohnR's Avatar
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    Re: Anatomy of a fake watch movement

    Quote Originally Posted by googoo
    i think the "Chinmiographe cemopie Chinsement" would have indicated that it wasn't the real movement more than a lack of number on the bridge.. They definitely want you to know that it is Chinese.
    Yea, somehow I didn't think that that is what was on the authentic movement. I guess they want you to be proud of their fake forged counterfeit movement. And the guy that was taking it apart for me wasn't exactly a Breitling enthusiast. He seemed to know plenty about watches and movements and all, but didn't have Breitling specific knowledge. And I could hardly read the thing initially, so for a few seconds he thought it was maybe real.

    John

  7. #6
    Member Altan's Avatar
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    That is rather scary...

    ... for especially folks like me. Even if I could open the back, I would not know what to look for... and unless it says "Made in China" in capital letters, I would think it was the real deal... :-S

    Thanks for the update...
    Altan
    Houston, TX

  8. #7
    Breitling Forum Moderator SnapIT's Avatar
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    Re: That is rather scary...

    Quote Originally Posted by Altan
    ... for especially folks like me. Even if I could open the back, I would not know what to look for... and unless it says "Made in China" in capital letters, I would think it was the real deal... :-S

    Thanks for the update...

    I dunno, maybe its my eye but its not that difficult to spot. Just one aspect seals the deal that its a fake for me. Atop the rotating weight there is the plate with "Breitling" etc.. affixed. Its normally engraved into the actual metal of the weight. Hehe.. the plate, its off center. Not by a bit but like +0.5mm causing it not to align with the curve of the base weight being furtherest out on the left of screen and its off centre to the centre roller bearing. How bad can you get.

    As for the rest, I guess, least possible attention to detail and still have a working unit describes the whole affair. If it doesn't stop because of metal flakes contaminating the works then it might be from the engraved plate breaking loose in the heat one day and jamming things up real good .

    Nice work John. Save these and repost them to the articles section when we have the go ahead from management on the recovery.
    Cheers,
    SnapIT

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  9. #8
    Member kr4mula's Avatar
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    Re: That is rather scary...

    Quote Originally Posted by SnapIT
    I dunno, maybe its my eye but its not that difficult to spot. Just one aspect seals the deal that its a fake for me. Atop the rotating weight there is the plate with "Breitling" etc.. affixed. Its normally engraved into the actual metal of the weight. Hehe.. the plate, its off center. Not by a bit but like +0.5mm causing it not to align with the curve of the base weight being furtherest out on the left of screen and its off centre to the centre roller bearing. How bad can you get.

    As for the rest, I guess, least possible attention to detail and still have a working unit describes the whole affair. If it doesn't stop because of metal flakes contaminating the works then it might be from the engraved plate breaking loose in the heat one day and jamming things up real good .

    Nice work John. Save these and repost them to the articles section when we have the go ahead from management on the recovery.
    I had the same thoughts when my brother-in-law showed me his new fake Patek. The logo was printed on the rotor - much more obvious than what you point out. Plus it didn't have any of the finishing that even this one tries to emulate. I tried to point these things out to him, but he really didn't have any idea what I was talking about. I guess my eye has become much more discriminating than I thought.

    I'm still wondering why they put the script French "Made in China" logo on there. My guess was they're trying to skirt around laws about making fakes (per that nice article someone posted a week or so ago). Then they sell the "branded" movements to the watch integrators that actually mark them with "Breitling" or whatever else.

    Cheers,

    Kevin

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