Back Cover Screw tightness
Like Tree9Likes

Thread: Back Cover Screw tightness

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    534

    Question Back Cover Screw tightness

    Hey battery-change experts,

    How tight do you tighten the back cover screws? I have a couple of battery changes I've just done, but I am waiting on silicone oil before I seal back up. I'm just not sure how tight I should tighten the screws when I do. I want to make sure I seal properly without going so tight I end up stripping fragile plastic threads.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    765
    I 'finger-tighten' them, in a diagonal cross pattern. Then one more round with a further quarter turn. The screw driver I use is pretty short, about 3" with a rotating shaft, to prevent over tightening.


    ---

  3. #3
    LUW
    LUW is offline
    Member LUW's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Brazil
    Posts
    5,713

    Re: Back Cover Screw tightness

    Quote Originally Posted by GS_Leng View Post
    I 'finger-tighten' them, in a diagonal cross pattern. Then one more round with a further quarter turn.
    That's basically how I do it, and then I tighten them up "just enough" - no need to make them super tight.
    Jim R likes this.
    Cheers!
    Luciano

  4. Remove Advertisements
    WatchUSeek.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Member cal..45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    CMOWE (Central Madhouse Of Western Europe)
    Posts
    8,512

    Re: Back Cover Screw tightness

    Just tighten the screws gently, crosswise and never use force.


    cheers
    We are 12.6 %

  6. #5
    Member G-Shocks Are Cool.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    3,432

    Re: Back Cover Screw tightness

    This is like of of those things you just don't want to think about when it comes to a watch you like. I have a few watches that I gave up trying to get new battery for at the jewelry store again and again. I just got like 6 watches now that I rotate, and that I keep as a backup for a backup now. And, any watch I have to change the battery for will have to be less than $50 for, and not worry about it if something happens to it replacing the battery. The way I look at it. Every time I change a cheap watch's battery. I can always get another one just in case the seal fails after I replace the battery. And, if it didn't. I guess I have another watch.
    The MTG is retired and the 5600 too. Right now, the only working G-Shocks that I use and enjoy are the Riseman GW9200-1 and the GW6900-1

    If I can own a Rolex Submariner I would. I know they are tough too, their homages are tough. Trust me.

    G-Shock MTG930DA-8V, G-Shock GW-5600J-1. G-Shock Riseman GW9200-1, G-Shock GW6900-1


  7. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    691

    Re: Back Cover Screw tightness

    There's no need to tighten the screws more than just finger tight - you won't make the watch any more watertight. The crucial thing is to get the screw started properly in its original thread - get a screwdriver which fits the Philips-head really well, and then get the screw completely vertical in its hole and very gently turn it, with no pressure - the screw thread should just drop into the original thread in the resin, and you should feel almost no resistance to turning - if you do feel resistance, stop, back out the screw and very gently start again. Once the screw is in it's thread sweetly, it will turn easily until you get right to the end, when it will tighten up a little (as it compresses the gasket) and then stop. So long as you just nip up the screw to tightness you've done enough - it won't come undone of its own accord, and forcing the screw tighter won't compress the O-ring gasket any more.

  8. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    534

    Re: Back Cover Screw tightness

    Thanks! That gives me some tactile guidance. It's hard to tell exactly what someone means by 'just enough' or 'finger tight'.
    Quote Originally Posted by MandoBear View Post
    There's no need to tighten the screws more than just finger tight - you won't make the watch any more watertight. The crucial thing is to get the screw started properly in its original thread - get a screwdriver which fits the Philips-head really well, and then get the screw completely vertical in its hole and very gently turn it, with no pressure - the screw thread should just drop into the original thread in the resin, and you should feel almost no resistance to turning - if you do feel resistance, stop, back out the screw and very gently start again. Once the screw is in it's thread sweetly, it will turn easily until you get right to the end, when it will tighten up a little (as it compresses the gasket) and then stop. So long as you just nip up the screw to tightness you've done enough - it won't come undone of its own accord, and forcing the screw tighter won't compress the O-ring gasket any more.

  9. #8
    LUW
    LUW is offline
    Member LUW's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Brazil
    Posts
    5,713

    Re: Back Cover Screw tightness

    Just a reminder for those who rather have a shop open/close their watches: a professional shop is NOT a guarantee that you will have your watch properly opened and closed.
    If you're not going to take the watch to an AD, I say do it yourself.
    GS_Leng likes this.
    Cheers!
    Luciano

  10. #9
    Member stpete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SoMD
    Posts
    1,070

    Re: Back Cover Screw tightness

    Quote Originally Posted by LUW View Post
    Just a reminder for those who rather have a shop open/close their watches: a professional shop is NOT a guarantee that you will have your watch properly opened and closed.
    If you're not going to take the watch to an AD, I say do it yourself.
    I wouldn't let a "professional" near my Gs. Why pay someone else to screw it up. If you have a rare G and want to make sure it's right, buy some cheap beat-up G's off ebay and practice. Otherwise, just do it.

    I'm sure there are some competent and trustworthy jewelers out there who do fine work. But, twice I dropped off one of my old 5600C, paid what the watch originally cost, and got back a watch that flooded the first time I jumped in a pool. One guy was supposedly a dive watch specialist and was going to pressure test it. Yeah right, he chopped the gasket with the screwback when he put it on. I found part of it inside the watch cut off. The second guy was a Rolex specialist in the area. He came recommended by some Rolex guys. He put it back together without the gasket. I'm pretty sure he meant to order a new gasket and put it in, but didn't as the back was not on very tight either. To his credit, that guy actually refunded my money and apologized. He might have been a reasonable repairman, but not very thorough/organized. Each guy took over a week with the watch (and were authorized Casio dealers BTW). Luckily the DW-5600C was robust and handled getting flooded twice. Also, both of these guys put batteries in that lasted less than a year. I suppose it's possible the flooding had something to do with it, but I doubt it. Cheap k-mart batteries usually lasted about 2 years in the same watch when I did it myself (older technology back then). In a pinch I had a watch Kiosk do it once and he did a fine job on the spot and only charged a few bucks.
    As a scuba diver, I wanted to be sure my watch wouldn't flood in 100ft so I took it to pros. But, both times it flooded in 2ft. I fixed it myself and it was fine to 100ft. Never again, do it yourself.
    Last edited by stpete; September 3rd, 2012 at 15:46.
    Current
    DW-8200MS "Kermit in Smoke" Frogman
    DW-8200F-4 Red Frogman
    GW-200-2 "Navy" Frogman - modded
    DW-5000SP "Bloody Project Team Tough mod"
    DW-9900 Frogman
    DW-5700 with 5600EH crystal "Screwback Eric Haze"
    GW-5000
    Beater G-3110

  11. #10
    Member greg1491's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    WNC, USA
    Posts
    1,835

    Re: Back Cover Screw tightness

    If your even moderately competent with hand tools you are better off doing this kind of work on your own watches. You care alot more about your watch than anyone else and will do a better job. Like stpete said "buy some cheap beat-up G's and practice". After I close one up the first thing I do is drop it in a bucket of water for awhile then set it in front of the exhaust fan on my computer to warm it up, then stick it in the freezer for awhile. I know for sure after those tests that I did the job right and I havent had one fail yet. I'm not too worried about pressure tests as I dont dive. I figure that if I'm ever 600 ft deep I wont be looking at my watch.
    Greg

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •