Are G-Shocks Solid State Watches?

Thread: Are G-Shocks Solid State Watches?

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  1. #1
    sml
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    Are G-Shocks Solid State Watches?

    As (I think) G-Shocks are quartz watches which have an oscillating crystal/quartz, would a G-Shock be called a solid state product?

    I guess another alternative to a bit of crystal/quartz would be like a CPU in other electronic devices - like a digital camera or motherboard or GPS - which I don't think have a piece of crystal keeping track of time.

    Are there any Gs or other watches which run without quartz crystals or mechanical methods.

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    Re: Are G-Shocks Solid State Watches?

    i think if not wrong motherboards have crystals in them.. check this article out. so i believe most or even all electronic devices have them!

    http://articles.techrepublic.com.com...1-5033567.html

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    Re: Are G-Shocks Solid State Watches?

    Based on my limited understanding, I would consider quartz a solid-state device. The crystal is not considered a moving part (even though, technically it is vibrating).

    Other electrical timepieces (such as clocks that plug into the wall) I think are regulated by the impulses of electricity.
    ShockMister

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    Re: Are G-Shocks Solid State Watches?

    Quote Originally Posted by sml View Post
    Are there any Gs or other watches which run without quartz crystals or mechanical methods.
    Not Gs, but there were some 'tuning fork' watches often known as 'hummers' (because they hummed). Omega made some, and they're quite collectible. Enthusiasts love the smooth sweep of the second-hand. They worked in the same way as the wall clocks mentioned above. Ate batteries, I think.
    I used to list my watches here until I realised it ruined people's Google searches...

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    Re: Are G-Shocks Solid State Watches?

    Quote Originally Posted by tribe125 View Post
    Not Gs, but there were some 'tuning fork' watches often known as 'hummers' (because they hummed). Omega made some, and they're quite collectible. Enthusiasts love the smooth sweep of the second-hand. They worked in the same way as the wall clocks mentioned above. Ate batteries, I think.
    I have one of those 'tuning fork' watches. A Bulova Accutron from 1966. Yes, it uses batteries, they last about a year, but back then every electric watch ate batteries. It works by vibrating the tuning fork at 360 Hz, that moved a gear with 360 teeth, etc. It still runs if I put a battery in it. However, I do not do that much, as it really needs servicing after not being used much in the last 20 years.
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    Re: Are G-Shocks Solid State Watches?

    Quote Originally Posted by tribe125 View Post
    Not Gs, but there were some 'tuning fork' watches often known as 'hummers' (because they hummed). Omega made some, and they're quite collectible. Enthusiasts love the smooth sweep of the second-hand. They worked in the same way as the wall clocks mentioned above. Ate batteries, I think.
    Sounds pretty interesting - didn't know Omega made them.

  8. #7
    sml
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    Re: Are G-Shocks Solid State Watches?

    Quote Originally Posted by boo85 View Post
    i think if not wrong motherboards have crystals in them.. check this article out. so i believe most or even all electronic devices have them!

    http://articles.techrepublic.com.com...1-5033567.html
    Wow .. interesting! It said that even some video cards & network cards etc have their own quartz crystals.

    I wonder what happens with other devices.

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    Re: Are G-Shocks Solid State Watches?

    Quote Originally Posted by boo85 View Post
    i think if not wrong motherboards have crystals in them.. check this article out. so i believe most or even all electronic devices have them!

    http://articles.techrepublic.com.com...1-5033567.html

    Almost every modern electronic system has at least one crystal on the PCB and some other analog peripherals. The digital part of the system will use the clock produced from the crystal to synchronize its internal functions and some times it will divide or multiply this clock and separate the logic to different clock domains. For many years now the trend is to have a synchronous design which has many advantages and solves a lot of problems. Very few designers are trying to make fully asynchronous designs and much research is to be done on this issue


  10. #9
    sml
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    Re: Are G-Shocks Solid State Watches?

    Interesting! I don't really know what I am talking about but thought CPU clock cycles or something like that might control the timing for a clock. Obviously not! :)

  11. #10
    Member gt-tech's Avatar
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    Re: Are G-Shocks Solid State Watches?

    Not exactly.....

    A CPU is an ASIC (Application Specific Integration Circuit) and it needs an external crystal to operate. This crystal gives a clock much smaller than the multi-Gigahertz frequencies that we all hear about. There are special circuits inside or outside of the CPU that multiply this clock and gives the appropriate frequency. In a system there may be many different devices, coming from different manufacturers, that needs much different external clocks to operate. So, there may be more than one external crystals.

    Of course, if we talk about watches we are probably talk about only one crystal for the entire PCB (Printed Circuit Board) (although I don't have experience on the design of an electronic watch)


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