Question about GW 9200 altimeter :)

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  1. #1
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    Question about GW 9200 altimeter :)

    Hi guys :) here i am with my first post and it's a question!

    So, i'm about to buy the gw 9200 and i wonder if sombody can tell me how accurate is the altimeter on this model?

    I'll be very thankful if you can share your expirience and knowledge! :)

  2. #2
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    Re: Question about GW 9200 altimeter :)

    So long as you set a reference altitude before you start measuring, it pretty much follows my GPS for altitude accuracy. The altimeter is simply a function of air pressure, you can get the altimeter accurate and it will stay that way, until air pressure changes (low front moves out, high moves in etc), this will skew your readings.
    DW-6100 Thermometer, GW-530A, MTG-1000, GW-9200 Riseman, GW200-MS Frogman, GWF-1000-1JF Atomic Solar Frogman, DW6900-CS, GW-200Z-1JF Final Frogman -- Proud Ham Radio Operator - K2JLX

  3. #3
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    Re: Question about GW 9200 altimeter :)

    hi stefan,

    i'm afraid it is not very accurate. basically it lacks three things to be a useful instrument:

    - thermocompensation
    - altimeter lock
    - sea-presssure level

    also, casio watches have only 5 meter increments which i find personally to rough (other ABC watch brands work with 1 meter increments)

    the riseman is okay if you stand in front of a skyscraper, set it to zero, enter an elevator and let it calculate the altitude in the 13th. floor. for outdoor use however, where temperature, air pressure and altitude might change quickly, it is useless in my opinion.

    the real strenght of the riseman is not in it's altimer/barometer but the ability to show current time in all modes along with the atomic/solar functions and a 24h cdt and 24h stw. only VERY FEW casio watches are able to do that, as far as i know, the riseman is the only atomic/solar g-shock to date with that features.


    cheers
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  5. #4
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    Re: Question about GW 9200 altimeter :)

    I dont have experience with the Suontos, but from what I read on this forum, there seem gto be consensus about Suontos are more precise, when it comes to barometer and altimeter readings.

    It doenst have to do with the sensors, Casios sensors are good. It's more about the algoritm behind - others can probably better explain how, than I can.

    The short story seems to be, that Casios are great for casualty og gadgetry, while Suontos are better as a regular tool.

    Me? I'm very happy with my Riseman

    EDIT: Ouch, Cal..45 was faster than me, sorry
    EDIT 2: I disagree the Riseman aint temperature compensated - if I put it in the fridge for 20+ minutes, it reads the same afterwards. Used another alti/baro watch kept at room temp as reference. Though, maybe other watches are better at this, when temps changes fast, I dont know.
    Last edited by ThomAsio; June 10th, 2010 at 18:02.

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    Re: Question about GW 9200 altimeter :)

    I have to disagree with Cal..45 to some extent. I have used Casio altimeter watches in the mountains for a number of years - before the Suunto Vector came out in 1998/99. At the time, I found them a pretty handy navigational aid - particularly if you take the trouble to calibrate them frequently from points of known altitude. I didn't find the 5 metre resolution to be a particular issue. Here in the UK, on 1:25000 maps, contour lines are at 5 metre intervals in lowland areas and 10 metre intervals in more mountainous areas, so 5 metres was (and is) generally good enough. The lack of thermo-compensation is a slight issue, but if you wear your watch next to your skin, and not strapped to the outside of your jacket, it's not too major.

    Having said all that, when the Suunto Vector came out, I bought one - mainly because I liked the feature set, and particularly the logbook, much better. I generally do find it more accurate as an altimeter - for the purposes that I use it for. But having said that, if you like the Riseman and its features, I think you will enjoy it. The fact that it's a G-Shock should also mean that it should be able to withstand more physical punishment than the Suunto watches (not that they aren't pretty tough).

    A lot of it comes down to learning the way a particular instrument behaves, and then using that understanding to get the most out of it.

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    Re: Question about GW 9200 altimeter :)

    Thanks a lot guys very useful info! I will not use the altimeter that much anyway, i was just curious. :) For me the barometer is more important ( i love the idea that you can in a way predict the weather) so i have the same question about it: how accurate is it and can i tell if its going to rain:)

    Again thanks for the replays :)

  8. #7
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    Re: Question about GW 9200 altimeter :)

    Quote Originally Posted by Stefan K View Post
    Thanks a lot guys very useful info! I will not use the altimeter that much anyway, i was just curious. :) For me the barometer is more important ( i love the idea that you can in a way predict the weather) so i have the same question about it: how accurate is it and can i tell if its going to rain:)
    The barometer is quite accurate. However, it shows the absolute pressure, not the normalized pressure with respect to sea level, which may or may not be a disadvantage (that is, it shows the same value as an "analog" barometer, but not necessarily the normalized value shown in the weather forecast).

    As far as predicting weather... if a Riseman were enough, meteorologists wouldn't need satellites However, the pressure graph can give you a semi-reliable rough idea of what's going to happen a few hours ahead, something along the line: "weather clearing up, let's get dressed" or "risk of rain soon, better take cover" or "more or less stable for now".

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