Seaglow and UV Bulbs
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By kung-fusion

Thread: Seaglow and UV Bulbs

Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Member psweeting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom
    Posts
    2,500

    Seaglow and UV Bulbs

    Just a quick question to the minority of folks on here who have used Seaglow to rectify the yellowing problem; did any of you try it indoors with a UV light?

    I've got a couple of clear jellies and a bottle of the stuff but autumn/winter in the UK isn't famous for the amount of sun we get. I'm going to buy a bulb tomorrow and give it a go on Thursday but if anyone has tried this and failed then it will save me a couple of quid.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Southern California, USA
    Posts
    7,352

    Re: Seaglow and UV Bulbs

    Quote Originally Posted by psweeting View Post
    Just a quick question to the minority of folks on here who have used Seaglow to rectify the yellowing problem; did any of you try it indoors with a UV light?

    I've got a couple of clear jellies and a bottle of the stuff but autumn/winter in the UK isn't famous for the amount of sun we get. I'm going to buy a bulb tomorrow and give it a go on Thursday but if anyone has tried this and failed then it will save me a couple of quid.
    Honestly, I wish I had never brought Sea Glow to the attention of this forum. Too many people who haven't tried it are suggesting it as a cure for yellowing. First off, the stuff needs to be activated by strong UV light (UV bulbs that are commerically available are probably not strong enough). Second, the results are temporary (a week to a couple months) in many cases. Without an agent to bond the Sea GLow to the resin, it won't last long. Third, if the yellowing is bad, it won't do anything except make the watch appear a brighter form of yellow.

    It DOES help, but is it worth it? I used Sea Glow at the peak of summer in Southern California, where the UV index was 9+ (fair skin burns in 10 minutes) and got mediocre results except when the resins were only SLIGHTLY yellow, in which case it helped. But it can also give the resin a blueish tinge (Sea Glow uses a blue dye that fluoresces under UV light).

    Sea Glow treated watches will look brighter when worn in sunlight, for a while.

    But it may be toxic.... And anything that touches the skin eventually gets absorbed into the blood in small amounts.

    So all in all, I don't recommend it anymore, and I wish that thread in the tutorials section is deleted
    tiger2 likes this.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •