Taking pictures of watches....

Thread: Taking pictures of watches....

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  1. #1
    Member Jeff_C's Avatar
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    Picture Taking pictures of watches....

    Mansrow asked earlier about pictures... I am NO expert and most of your shots are better than mine... But, I thought maybe we could have a thread on it. (Plus my ride got cancelled for this morning and I already have an espresso in me!)

    So if your camera has a macro setting, you will want to use that. Im not sure what this does. (Sjors can explain the science or technology! :) ) But it allows the little elves that live in your camera to focus on things VERY close up.

    Lighting is probably the biggest thing. Im a fan of natural light. Sunrise and sunset make beautiful light. Whatever source of light you use, you will want to diffuse it. A macro shot cant have that brilliant flash. Especially when photographing something as shiny as a cool G Shock. I used to take a single piece of paper and hold it over the flash on the cam. It would let enough light to snap the shot but not so much as to cause reflections...

    Then I built a light box using a translucent storage bin and lots of BRIGHT external lights. This was fun but tedious... So then I jsut started all my shots outside...

    Here are some examples...

    See how washed out this is? Its a flash in a macro setting...


    This one was done with a piece of paper over the flash... look how it softens the light...

    But these were still early experimentations...
    This one was with a light box... (Still a little washed)

    I like interesting colorful backgrounds... but dont let them overtake the subject...
    This is just a fleece jacket with some bike tools...

    Sometimes simplicity is best... and sometimes you get lucky!



    And some watches just photograph better than others. This one you could do anything to and the shots just come out ok!




    Then I started playing with outside light... its easier than using a box and a zillion lights!
    But time of day is everything...




    Here is an interesting shot... This is a piece of paper curved over on a desk with another piece just behind it making a little light box. Then the desk light is RIGHT ON TOP (dont catch the paper on fire).

    See how soft the lighting is... mmmm like buttah

    This one is on the bumper of my truck as the sun is jsut getting behind the trees...


    mmm early morning sun... yummy... I like this one because of the texture of the rocks... simple, but a nice background...

    and one more..


    I think the biggest issue is macro setting, and lighting... beyond that about one in 12-15 shots make it to you guys. Many are discarded because of composition or glare. And personally, I don't re-touch any of my pics in software, but I hear thats how you get the really REALLY good "catalog" shots.

    So, my pics aren't that good. But maybe we can get some follow up posts here and learn from each other!

    THANKS!
    Suunto... Replacing Luck!



  2. #2
    Member G'ed's Avatar
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    Re: Taking pictures of watches....

    nice guide, Jeff

    those photos equivalent of 100X poisons
    Rolex 116600 LN || Seiko SBDC033 || G-Shock GW9400-1 & G7800B1
    Omega SMP Quartz
    (on missus wrist)

  3. #3
    Member Snowback's Avatar
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    Re: Taking pictures of watches....


    Maybe we should add this in the "How To" section at the top of the forum. It should go in the thread: "How to take a Picture of a G-Shock"
    https://forums.watchuseek.com/showthread.php?t=25234

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  5. #4
    Member kontai69's Avatar
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    Re: Taking pictures of watches....

    Nice pics and writeup.
    Other tips...
    1. Use a tripod. This is almost a must for extreme macro (closeup) shots.
    2. I find one of the most useful tools in getting good photos is to edit the pics with Photoshop. The curves tool is the most useful. This can be used to bring out details in the dark areas of pics, thus fine tuning the exposure. See attachments of a before and after "curves" adjustment I did using one of your pics. See how the details in the black objects show up better. The clone stamp tool can also remove dust specks from the watch which tend to show up in macro shots.

    But yeah, getting good pics is mostly just trial and error, mainly with lighting. At least the "film" is free with digital.

    Here is one of my better watch shots...
    http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d1...s/IMG_3570.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images




    MY COLLECTION
    Breitling Aerospace SuperQuartz E75362
    Omega Seamaster Pro Chronometer Mid-size 2052.50
    Sinn 356 Flieger Acrylic on C&B strap
    Seiko SARB027
    Tissot T-Classic Desire T52142113

    Luminox 7051
    J. Crew Timex Vintage Field Watch
    Vintage Hamilton's: Boyd, Parker-B, Boulton, A-652, Pan Europ 701, Tonneau, Arnold

    Casio G-Shock DW5600E-1V (with Mil-Shock mod)

  6. #5
    Member WhtShadow's Avatar
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    Re: Taking pictures of watches....

    Jeff,

    Great shots! I agree that only about 1 in 10 is worthy. And I'm not sure I could add much more. I also try the manual focus feature of my cameras, as it can give more flexibility in the shot. I also like nature in the background.

    Again, good job, and thanks for the tutorial!
    WhtShadow

    Current Collection
    Casio 'non-G' 83QS-41, DW-1500, OAW-100TDJ, PAW-1300T,
    G-Shock GW-M5600, GW-800D, MTG-1000G,
    Bulova Accutron 214, Omega SMP 2232.80, Omega SMP 2255.80, Ball Engineer M Challenger, Traser Auto Pro,
    Seiko SDWB61, SNA139, SKA389, SKA296, Momentum Cobalt V Lite, Orient Mako Blue, Orient Mako USA 2 White,
    Victorinox (Swiss Army) Ground Force 60/60, Base Camp Ti

  7. #6
    Moderator DougFNJ's Avatar
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    Re: Taking pictures of watches....

    This is a great thread, just out of curiosity, how much does camera fall into the equation of the good shot?
    Apple Watch Space Black Series 4 w/ LTE
    Casio G-Shock DW-5600C Speed
    Casio G-Shock GMW-B5000GD-1JF
    Casio G-Shock GWF-1000-1DR Frogman

    Casio G-Shock GW-7900B-1 Rescue
    Citizen ATO810-55X
    Omega SeaMaster Pro Ceramic 212.30.41.20.01.003
    Omega Seamaster Pro Bond Quartz 2221.80
    Omega Speedmaster Co Axial Moon Watch 311.33.44.51.01.002

    Seiko SKA625
    Seiko Velatura SNAA93
    Seiko V701


    Check out my video reviews at:
    www.youtube.com/dougfnj
    Twitter: @DougFNJ



  8. #7
    Member Jeff_C's Avatar
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    Re: Taking pictures of watches....

    Probably a good bit.. but mine is nothing special at all. Its a little "point and click" travel camera.

    Actually Ive never liked the normal shots it takes LOL... I do like its macro abilities though...

    I use a Toshiba PDR 3320 3.2 mega pixel whatsy whosie jobber.

    The cracked housing was from a ski trip and comes optional.
    Suunto... Replacing Luck!



  9. #8
    Member WhtShadow's Avatar
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    Re: Taking pictures of watches....

    I have a Canon A710IS, a Canon A720IS, and a Canon S3IS. They all do great. As they are a bit older, not sure the prices. Not the smallest, nit the largest. But, good options!

  10. #9
    Member gaijin's Avatar
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    Re: Taking pictures of watches....

    Great thread, Jeff!

    Now let's get really close:





    I really like the different perspective a close macro shot gives.

    This does, however, present a few significant challenges.

    First, a tripod is a must - any vibration is greatly magnified at this range.

    Light: although I would rather shoot with available light for those "atmosphere" shots, 1:1 macro almost requires a strobe. In this case, I used a Macro Ring Light on the front of the lens which evenly flashes light all around the subject.

    Lens: definitely a macro lens - in this case with a Macro Extender to really get up close and personal.

    Exposure: with a strobe and macro shooting, it's important to get enough depth of field to make the photo look good. In this case, I used f32.

    Looking forward to seeing more shots!

    .

  11. #10
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    Re: Taking pictures of watches....

    Great thread. I like the idea of a how to link very informative stuff.

    Great Pics

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