2824-2 rotor movement

Thread: 2824-2 rotor movement

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  1. #1
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    2824-2 rotor movement

    How easily should the rotor turn in a 2824-2 movement?

    As I hold my watch vertical and rotate it, the rotor moves with a slight hesitation through 360 degrees in either direction. I assume the hesitation is caused by the friction of the gear train.

    But if I use more subtle movements, trying to replicate the swinging of my arm through maybe a 30 degree arc while walking, the rotor stays almost entirely motionless. I am likely getting little or no winding action from normal walking arm movement.

    Is that normal?

  2. #2
    Member clouser's Avatar
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    Re: 2824-2 rotor movement

    I think it's probably OK. On all of my automatics, the rotor moves with slight hesitation. The rotor probably won't be rotating while you're walking since it isn't designed to move THAT freely. The rotations happen during other movements..ie. lifing your hand to your face, reaching for something, etc.

    I think a good way to test the power reserve is to let the power reserve run down, shake the watch gently just until the watch starts running again, then wear it all day. That night, take the watch off and let it sit until the power reserve runs down again. If it runs for more than 20-30 hours, you're good.
    We are how we treat each other and nothing more.

  3. #3
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    Re: 2824-2 rotor movement

    Quote Originally Posted by siodad View Post
    How easily should the rotor turn in a 2824-2 movement?

    As I hold my watch vertical and rotate it, the rotor moves with a slight hesitation through 360 degrees in either direction. I assume the hesitation is caused by the friction of the gear train.

    But if I use more subtle movements, trying to replicate the swinging of my arm through maybe a 30 degree arc while walking, the rotor stays almost entirely motionless. I am likely getting little or no winding action from normal walking arm movement.

    Is that normal?

    If the watch is fully wound then yes. The more wound the watch is the resistance to winding the rotor will display.
    Seiko / Orient / Hamilton

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  5. #4
    lvt
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    Re: 2824-2 rotor movement

    Quote Originally Posted by siodad View Post
    I assume the hesitation is caused by the friction of the gear train.
    Probably the tension of the mainspring has something to do with the hesitation, let the watch runs out of power to see if the rotor spins more freely
    Ball - Casio (G-shock) - HMT - Longines - Parnis - Seagull - Steinhart - Tissot - Victorinox - Yema

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