Automatic rotor and winding mechanism?

Thread: Automatic rotor and winding mechanism?

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  1. #1
    Member TRW Motorsport's Avatar
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    Automatic rotor and winding mechanism?

    If this belongs in the watchmaking forum please move it!

    But here is a question about the rotor, bearings (jewels?), disengagement clutch etc.

    *This is not another 'can my auto take the beating?' threads. I know that people could run 20k+ miles with the same auto on and it would not make a difference*

    I was out for a run this morning with my Seiko SKX007 with 7S26 movement and I was thinking about the following. With constant arm motion the rotor will be spinning non stop. Is it the jewels that allow for free movement of the rotor and its 'axle' or is there a ball/needle bearing? Do these friction reducing parts wear and require replacing during regular service?

    What about a large impact or acceleration perpendicular to the axle, is it possible to bend or break that axle?

    Lastly, what about the gears on the other end of the rotor on the axle. I assume that these are in almost constant motion due to the person wearing the watch. Do they wear quickly?

    I am just amazed that these watches/rotors can see so many revolutions and adverse accelerations during there service time!

    Thank you and happy holidays!

    Tyler,

    I almost forgot the mandatory wrist shot! Since it was so nice out this morning (25f) I was able to just wear this long sleeve shirt and brought the 007 along for the trip!

    http://tylerwalsh.webs.com/

    Current rotation:
    Breitling Superocean Steelfish A17390
    Bulova Precisionist 98B142
    Victorinox Maverick II Chronograph and Maverick II GMT
    Seiko SKX007
    Invicta 8926C
    Casio MDV-102
    Fossil Chronograph

  2. #2
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    Re: Automatic rotor and winding mechanism?

    Quote Originally Posted by TRW Motorsport View Post
    Is it the jewels that allow for free movement of the rotor and its 'axle' or is there a ball/needle bearing?
    Some rotors use jewels, some use bearings (JLC, Bucherer, and a few other brands even use ceramic bearings for even longer wear now), and some use a combination of both. There's more than one way to skin a cat, and naturally the more expensive watches use the higher priced materials for the most part.

    Quote Originally Posted by TRW Motorsport View Post
    Do these friction reducing parts wear and require replacing during regular service?
    Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Steel ball bearings certainly have the most potential for wear, and then the rotor wobbles and becomes inefficient.

    Quote Originally Posted by TRW Motorsport View Post
    What about a large impact or acceleration perpendicular to the axle, is it possible to bend or break that axle?
    Possible? Yes, but the balance staff (axel that runs through the balance wheel) has the most delicate pivots so it's the most likely to break even with shock protection.

    Quote Originally Posted by TRW Motorsport View Post
    Lastly, what about the gears on the other end of the rotor on the axle. I assume that these are in almost constant motion due to the person wearing the watch. Do they wear quickly?
    I think you're referring to the automatic's reverser wheels, and you are correct that they have to change direction frequently and are in motion the most of almost any parts in your watch. They were designed to take this kind of punishment though, and they are treated with different substances than the gear train's wheels during a routine service.

  3. #3
    Member TRW Motorsport's Avatar
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    Re: Automatic rotor and winding mechanism?

    Thank you very very much for the reply!
    http://tylerwalsh.webs.com/

    Current rotation:
    Breitling Superocean Steelfish A17390
    Bulova Precisionist 98B142
    Victorinox Maverick II Chronograph and Maverick II GMT
    Seiko SKX007
    Invicta 8926C
    Casio MDV-102
    Fossil Chronograph

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  5. #4
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    Re: Automatic rotor and winding mechanism?

    The 7s26 movement uses ball bearings. Even though it isnt a sealed bearing, it's hardly turning at a rate that will wear down steel too fast. Other things in your watch will fail/need a service before you wear out a defect free ball bearing.

  6. #5
    Member lysanderxiii's Avatar
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    Re: Automatic rotor and winding mechanism?

    Very few people use a jeweled bearing for the rotor these days. While it does give better shock resistance and improves efficiency, they require more frequent oiling to prevent wear
    familiaritas parit contemptum; raritate admiratione wins.- Lucius Apuleius
    est necessry, accurate ad secundo? - Lysander magna
    iustum est horologium - Obscurus Genius

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