Business considerations
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Thread: Business considerations

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  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Business considerations

    I have wanted to buy a gold luxury watch for many years and one of the reasons for doing it now is business considerations. Most of my customers are from a country where they buy and wear a lot more gold than Americans do, men included. So I want to add that to my attire make them more comfortable, and to possibly have another common topic of conversation. I already wear business suits, a gold band, and I adopt some customs, and I think the watch is a good complement. There is my shameless admission Anyone else have watch tips or stories for impressing clients?

  2. #2
    Moderator at Large stuffler,mike's Avatar
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    Re: Business considerations

    If you can't impress them with what you do and offer you can't impress them with adopting their habits.
    Kind regards
    Mike


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  3. #3
    Member Ray MacDonald's Avatar
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    Re: Business considerations

    Meet their needs with what you offer. it's really as simple as that.

    There are fathers who do not love their children; there is no grandfather who does not adore his grandson. ~ Victor Hugo

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  5. #4
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    Re: Business considerations

    this is an interesting concept as it's something that i'm cnscious of with my work..

    I have a number of differnet clients that work in different industries and are of different ages/backgrounds.

    As such whilst something may be well received by one client (watch/clothes/car) it may be off putting to another. Because I'm conscious of this i will wear/not wear specific items with specific clients based on my knowledge of them and with people i've not yet I try to be as reserved as possible.

    As others have pointed out someone is unlikely to do business with you jsut because of what you wear/drive and we'd be quickly found out if our service/offering was poor. However these things can be ice breakers/positives and can be a part of the overall feeling someone gets about you - people buy people.

    Key things is to be aware that these things can work both for and against us.
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  6. #5
    Member CitizenM's Avatar
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    Re: Business considerations

    Some of "my" (my firm's) clients were fairly wealthy Pakistani businessmen and they usually came clad in gold everything. I actually made an effort to determine the identity of the many gold watches, but honestly, I couldn't recognize even one of them. Maybe they're all vintage PPs or something lol.

    While I highly doubt a watch by itself will noticeably increase client relations, it seems like some other posters are...hmm...I seriously don't want to be mean here, but perhaps a little naive in regards to how some (not all) international cultures approach dress.

    In many cultures, you must show how rich you are 24/7. Failure to do so is an admission of failure, essentially. You have to wear your rank and status on your sleeve or you will be perceived to not be very good. After all, a successful lawyer or doctor (or what have you) would obviously wear a Rolex instead of a Casio--unless of course he couldn't afford one, right?

    Wherever we went in Vietnam, we had two matching chauffeured customized black Mercedes S550 AMGs. Generally we went with two of them. I had a motorcycle. We also had taxis and Camrys and so on. But that's just now how you do it if you're successful. In Vietnam, each of those cars cost about $160,000 USD. The average income in Vietnam, country wide is $2000 a year.

    But it wasn't seen as pretentious. It was just patently obvious that, if you can afford it, you really should clad yourself in Gucci and LV and Rolexes and AMGs and so on.

    Personally, I'm quite austere, happy with my Joseph A. Banks suits and Seiko watches. I still enjoy the cars though.

  7. #6
    Member hughjd's Avatar
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    Re: Business considerations

    While I normally echo the sentiments above, let your offer and professionalism speak for itself, depending on where they are from and what the cultural norms are, adopting some customs can help you close a deal, especially if you're an outsider. Adopting their customs isn't going to help if you can't provide them with the best offer or the best level of service. But, all things being equal, it might make a difference in a "coin-flip" situation where they may have to choose between you and a competitor. I can see instances where wearing gold might communicate a sense of success or honesty (or whatever positive connotation their culture associates with gold). Obviously, everything is entirely dependent on your client's cultural norms and how important gold is to them. Some cultures will notice your overtures and react positively, other cultures will not care. In the end, YMMV, and you're ultimately the best judge of your how your customers will react.
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  8. #7
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    Re: Business considerations

    Depends on where you do business. While I'm wary of stereotypes, I've found that of all the groups, Asians and Europeans pay the most attention to outfits and accessories in business/formal settings.

    And in my personal experience, Asians (and that includes both East Asians and South Asians) seem to pay far more attention to such things as watches and rings than any other group. I would also add Russians to the list.

    And when doing business in the middle east, especially at the more senior levels, folks are sometimes asked not to wear cuff links because they are considered jewelry, and potentially offensive.
    Last edited by Metlin; December 5th, 2011 at 05:04.
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  9. #8
    Member Will_f's Avatar
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    My Asian experience is that in Asia, if you are selling high end anything, you need to look high end. My Asian relatives generally look like slobs most of the time in private and at home (especially the under forty set), but they definitely dress up much more than most Americans when the occasion calls for it, and gold is very much in evidence.
    CitizenM likes this.
    Owner of a bunch of cool watches.


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