Do You Have to Own It to Know Whether It Works for You?
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Thread: Do You Have to Own It to Know Whether It Works for You?

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  1. #1
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    Do You Have to Own It to Know Whether It Works for You?

    I see enough comments, by folks whom I presume have been doing this a while, that can admire/provide feedback on a watch and then note that "it wouldn't work for my because of ________________.

    How long did it take you to figure out what diameter, height, lug design, watch style(s), etc. work for your wrist build, personal style, lifestyle, etc.

    Certainly there's the intangabile factor to consider as well.

    Do you have to own a watch to know if it works for you?

    JB

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    Member portauto's Avatar
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    Re: Do You Have to Own It to Know Whether It Works for You?

    Quote Originally Posted by rezoguitar View Post
    I see enough comments, by folks whom I presume have been doing this a while, that can admire/provide feedback on a watch and then note that "it wouldn't work for my because of ________________.

    How long did it take you to figure out what diameter, height, lug design, watch style(s), etc. work for your wrist build, personal style, lifestyle, etc.

    Certainly there's the intangabile factor to consider as well.

    Do you have to own a watch to know if it works for you?

    JB
    I've had to own and flip a few timepieces to know what really works for me. I've also found my taste in watch has developed and changed over the past 10 years, and I now find myself gravitating towards simpler and smaller timepieces (38-40mm). I've also been fortunate to have tried on hundreds of watches over the years at many AD's ranging from Casio to A. Lange & Sohne, and it's helped me narrow down my particular taste.

    Based on your handle, I see you like guitars. I suppose you could apply many of the same analogies to purchasing a guitar as you would a wristwatch.

    Kindest Regards,
    Portauto
    Last edited by portauto; February 18th, 2013 at 02:14.
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    Re: Do You Have to Own It to Know Whether It Works for You?

    Good point.

    There are just certain guitars you bond with, mostly determined by intangibles.

    I can walk into Guitar Center and try a dread size acoustic (large) or Les Paul electric (heavy). The problem: it's hard to determine (that) in a short period of time. Dreads can take a toll on many peoples shoulders and Les Pauls can really give a backache. Don't know that for months or years. Another similarity is that a lot of the stuff you want to try is boutique - internet only. Must buy to try in many cases...

    I wish I could go into an A/D and try on a bunch of watches, but then I think with my eyes to much...

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    Re: Do You Have to Own It to Know Whether It Works for You?

    I agree with Portauto's thoughts, trying a few on makes a huge difference. Also WIS's pictures, stating wrist size helps considerably.

    I think the style part is individual & easy, the size part more critical if you have a smaller wrist. I'm a shade under 7", and wear anything from a 37mm-44mm....but 39mm-40mm is my sweet spot.
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    Re: Do You Have to Own It to Know Whether It Works for You?

    Quote Originally Posted by rezoguitar View Post
    How long did it take you to figure out what diameter, height, lug design, watch style(s), etc. work for your wrist build, personal style, lifestyle, etc
    About ten years, and I still get it wrong.
    I used to list my watches here until I realised it ruined people's Google searches...

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    Re: Do You Have to Own It to Know Whether It Works for You?

    Quote Originally Posted by rezoguitar View Post
    I see enough comments, by folks whom I presume have been doing this a while, that can admire/provide feedback on a watch and then note that "it wouldn't work for my because of ________________.

    How long did it take you to figure out what diameter, height, lug design, watch style(s), etc. work for your wrist build, personal style, lifestyle, etc.

    Certainly there's the intangabile factor to consider as well.

    Do you have to own a watch to know if it works for you?

    JB
    I dont think the dimensions of a watch matter as much on paper as how the watch looks on you when you try it on. I say this with the caveat that if yoúr wrist is under 7inches (as is mine), a case diameter above 42mm is probably too large. However if the lugs are designed to curve and are short even larger case diameters can work - hence the critical need to try a potential timepiece on. There is definitely an "intangible" factor. Several watches I have seen images of and liked, either failed to live up to expectations in the flesh, or, equally the opposite situation has occurred. But the answer to your fundamental question, IMO is YES. You do have to own the watch to know if it really works for you or not. The clearest example I can give is when I bought a G-shock for use in sport. Having researched the functions, found the look, tried it on and really liking it, the first time I went on a run and started timing myself, I realised very quickly the stopwatch digits were far too small to read in full flight, ie completely USELESS for what I wanted it for. I guess I should have done a couple of laps when in the shop......
    Last edited by jt67; February 18th, 2013 at 04:00.

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