ETA 2824-2 winding question
Like Tree14Likes

Thread: ETA 2824-2 winding question

Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 47
  1. #1
    Member Jcp311's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,936

    ETA 2824-2 winding question

    To wind or not to wind....I know this has been addressed before, but I haven't totally been satisfied with the responses I've read. I'm wondering if it is ok to occasionally hand wind an ETA 2824-2 movement. I've read in previous forum posts that it is generally not a good idea because it grinds down some of the internal gears that happen to be made of a softer metal (or something along those lines). However where I have really seen this do acutal documented damage is in watches that were not serviced for years while the owner contiued to manually wind the movement. I'm hypothesizing that the damage done by the manual winding occured because of improper maintinence (i.e. no maintinence).

    Would it be fair to say that as long as the movement is properly lubricated and checked every few years manual winding isn't a big deal? I would think that ETA with it's quality standards wouldn't produce a movement prone to failure because of a built in feature. Obviously automatics are best wound when worn on the wrist or on a winder, but every time I set my watch when I'm traveling, or when it runs out a juice I notice that simply screwing down the crown winds the movement. I want to know that this isn't causing any undue harm to the watch.

    Also, on a slightly different topic do miyota movements have the same reported problems?
    Sic'em Bears.

  2. #2
    Member little big feather's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    10,871

    Re: ETA 2824-2 winding question

    IT IS OK TO WIND YOUR ETA MOVEMENT.
    Watchbreath and richnyc like this.

  3. #3
    Member copperjohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas via Washington St
    Posts
    7,357

    Re: ETA 2824-2 winding question

    Quote Originally Posted by Jcp311 View Post
    To wind or not to wind....I know this has been addressed before, but I haven't totally been satisfied with the responses I've read. I'm wondering if it is ok to occasionally hand wind an ETA 2824-2 movement.
    Yes.

    My collection may be complete, but it is never completed


    Collection: Rolex Submariner 116610; Seikos Orange Monster, Black Monster, 007 (X2) 009, SRPB53, SPB079, and SRP775; Hamilton Khaki 42mm; Halios Laguna; 2012 WUS CMW Forum Dual Crown Project Watch; Invite Pro Diver 8926OB; Casio Pathfinder PAG40; G-Shock GD350, GW7900B-1, DW9052-1BCG. GMW5610-1, DW5600, DW5600CMB-1, DW5900, GW-9400-1CR; Orient 2ER; Some other stuff.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    WatchUSeek.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    NYC/Philly
    Posts
    2,036

    Re: ETA 2824-2 winding question

    It is no problem to wind the watch.

    Sent from my XT907 using Tapatalk 2

  6. #5
    Moderator Public Forum John MS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    20,654

    Re: ETA 2824-2 winding question

    If you fully hand wind every day you will likely wear the crown, tube and threads (if any) sooner than if you just use the very efficient winding rotor. If you wear the watch for one day there should be sufficient power reserve to allow it to rest for one day. Just wear your watch every day and only the time should need to be reset every few weeks. Otherwise just let the watch run down.
    falcon4311 likes this.

  7. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    9,059

    Re: ETA 2824-2 winding question

    That's a little glib you guys as though you're replying to an annoying OP, which is not the case. Jcp, you're right about the handwinding "softer metal" issue with the 2824, which WUS member/watchmaker Lysanderxiii brought up a couple years ago. He mentioned the 7750 as being comparatively robust, but obviously he's not done a comprehensive survey of automatic movements, so I don't know about your Miyota question.

    The "softer metal" problem, if it exists, seems odd ETA would cheap out there. I mean how much can a tiny harder metal cost? Nonetheless, you make a million movements, save a couple pennies, they add up.

    Russia's Vostok is one of the few watch companies to be clear about usage of their hand winding feature on their automatics. Wind it 10-15 times, put it on your wrist. It seems clear (well maybe not clear) that automatic watch movements are not made stronger than their intended duty, as very part-time hand winders.

    I don't know the failure rate of hand-wound watches compared with automatics--either way it's a friction process. I'll do what Vostok says, 10-15 times then let my wrist do the rest.

    You make a tool, you explain its use to the buyer.
    Jcp311 likes this.
    "Can we bless or at least not curse whatever struggles to stay alive on this planet of struggles?"

    "To live and to die in gratefulness if in no other virtue."

    -Galway Kinnell

  8. #7
    Moderator Public Forum John MS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    20,654

    Re: ETA 2824-2 winding question

    Don't forget that the automatic winding rotor was designed to minimize the need for watch owners to hand wind their watch. Automatic watches are designed to be worn day after day with only infrequent owner intervention to correct the time and date. Handwind watches were known for needing periodic crown and crown tube replacement and automatic watches should rarely need that repair.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean779 View Post
    That's a little glib you guys as though you're replying to an annoying OP, which is not the case. Jcp, you're right about the handwinding "softer metal" issue with the 2824, which WUS member/watchmaker Lysanderxiii brought up a couple years ago. He mentioned the 7750 as being comparatively robust, but obviously he's not done a comprehensive survey of automatic movements, so I don't know about your Miyota question.

    The "softer metal" problem, if it exists, seems odd ETA would cheap out there. I mean how much can a tiny harder metal cost? Nonetheless, you make a million movements, save a couple pennies, they add up.

    Russia's Vostok is one of the few watch companies to be clear about usage of their hand winding feature on their automatics. Wind it 10-15 times, put it on your wrist. It seems clear (well maybe not clear) that automatic watch movements are not made stronger than their intended duty, as very part-time hand winders.

    I don't know the failure rate of hand-wound watches compared with automatics--either way it's a friction process. I'll do what Vostok says, 10-15 times then let my wrist do the rest.

    You make a tool, you explain its use to the buyer.
    falcon4311 likes this.

  9. #8
    Member Jcp311's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,936

    Re: ETA 2824-2 winding question

    Thanks Sean...The input is appreciated. I certainly didn't mean to be annoying or incite any loathing with the post. I'm relatively new to the watch world and have recently bought a few of my first "respectable" watches all with ETA 2824's. The hand winding issue seems to be in my opinion a shortfall of the movement. It's strange to me that it's marketed (at least with micro-brands) as a "workhorse" movement when it's vulnerable to this kind of issue. Though from what else I've read the people encountering the most difficulty with their ETA movements are people who don't get them serviced regularly. As a watchmaker recently put it to me "If it ain't broke don't fix it" absolutely does not apply to watches.


    Quote Originally Posted by Sean779 View Post
    That's a little glib you guys as though you're replying to an annoying OP, which is not the case. Jcp, you're right about the handwinding "softer metal" issue with the 2824, which WUS member/watchmaker Lysanderxiii brought up a couple years ago. He mentioned the 7750 as being comparatively robust, but obviously he's not done a comprehensive survey of automatic movements, so I don't know about your Miyota question.

    The "softer metal" problem, if it exists, seems odd ETA would cheap out there. I mean how much can a tiny harder metal cost? Nonetheless, you make a million movements, save a couple pennies, they add up.

    Russia's Vostok is one of the few watch companies to be clear about usage of their hand winding feature on their automatics. Wind it 10-15 times, put it on your wrist. It seems clear (well maybe not clear) that automatic watch movements are not made stronger than their intended duty, as very part-time hand winders.

    I don't know the failure rate of hand-wound watches compared with automatics--either way it's a friction process. I'll do what Vostok says, 10-15 times then let my wrist do the rest.

    You make a tool, you explain its use to the buyer.
    Sic'em Bears.

  10. #9
    Member Jcp311's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,936

    Re: ETA 2824-2 winding question

    I don't know if I quite agree with you on the point that auto movements are supposed to require "infrequent intervention." ETA's basic grade 2824-2 can gain (or lose) up to 30 seconds a day if I'm not mistaken. About once every two weeks or so I have to set my ETA based watches back about five minutes. I'd be disappointed if a movement (assuming proper maintinence) couldn't handle this routine wear and tear over time.


    Quote Originally Posted by John MS View Post
    Don't forget that the automatic winding rotor was designed to minimize the need for watch owners to hand wind their watch. Automatic watches are designed to be worn day after day with only infrequent owner intervention to correct the time and date. Handwind watches were known for needing periodic crown and crown tube replacement and automatic watches should rarely need that repair.
    Sic'em Bears.

  11. #10
    Member tribe125's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    29,513

    Re: ETA 2824-2 winding question

    If the watch is wound down, then giving it a decent wind to start it will no do harm. Winding it unnecessarily thereafter makes little sense - although there will be a few people who simply don't move enough, or with enough range of movement, to keep an auto going.
    I used to list my watches here until I realised it ruined people's Google searches...

Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Tags for this Thread

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •