Handing down watches - how important?

Thread: Handing down watches - how important?

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    262

    Handing down watches - how important?

    For the sake of discussion, some questions I've been pondering in relation to buying my next watch. Will it be a true tool watch like the Marathon SAR? A more expensive, timeless beauty with tool-like qualities, like a Planet Ocean or Seadweller?

    When buying an automatic watch, how much consideration do you give to handing down the watch to the next generation?

    Think about the watches you own, which ones would you will pass on to one of your kids? Would it be worth anything, beyond the sentimenatal value? Say you wear a Seiko or Marathon diver all your life, when you pass it on to your son, he values it because he saw you wear it all your life. A generation or two later, essentially it's a beat up old watch. Not worth getting fixed. Substitute "rolex" for "seiko" and the story is different, (not arguing the right or wrong of it, it just is.) Does this weigh in your decision at all? What watch brands do you think qualify in this regard?

    I have to say it matters in my decision. I have two sons and I have one nice watch. I'm going to get another watch that I will alternate wear with. One day these will go to my boys. I want the boys to fight over them. (Kidding.) A couple of generations down the road it I think it would be nice if someone was holding up my watch and thinking about "great-grandpa."

    Steve

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,339

    Re: Handing down watches - how important?

    I have a watch that I'm pretty sure if I have kids and when they get older I still have the watch I will give it to them. It's not a Rolex but it has a great movement in it.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    San Jose, California-USA
    Posts
    37,145

    Re: Handing down watches - how important?

    None!

  4. Remove Advertisements
    WatchUSeek.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Member Daddel Virks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    838

    Re: Handing down watches - how important?

    Handing down is a market gig.
    Very few people hand down their watches, and preserve them for the next generation.
    But to say that it is possible to hand down a watch, because it allways will be reparable sounds good though.
    If I have any left before I die I will most certainly hand them down to the next generation.
    Which watch that is going to be...................

    Cheers,

    Daddel.
    Got a new watch, divers watch it is, had to drown the bastard to get it!

  6. #5

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    737

    Re: Handing down watches - how important?

    Seven years ago, when my son turned 21, I gave him the last remaining gold/SS Rolex from my "old" collection. Now that my "new" collection is all divers - he doesn't have a hope of getting any of them while I'm still breathing.

  7. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,339

    Re: Handing down watches - how important?

    Hello, little man. Boy, I sure heard a bunch about you. See, I was a good friend of your dad's. We were in that Hanoi pit of hell together over five years. Hopefully...you'll never have to experience this yourself, but when two men are in a situation like me and your Dad were, for as long as we were, you take on certain responsibilities of the other. If it had been me who had not made it, Major Coolidge would be talkin' right now to my son Jim. But the way it turned out is I'm talkin' to you, Butch. I got somethin' for you.
    (The Captain sits down and pulls a gold wrist watch from his pocket)
    This watch I got here was first purchased by your great-grandfather during the first World War. It was bought in a little general store in Knoxville, Tennessee. Made by the first company to ever make wrist watches. Up till then people just carried pocket watches. It was bought by private Doughboy Erine Coolidge on the day he set sail for Paris. It was your great-grandfather's war watch and he wore it everyday he was in that war. When he had done his duty, he went home to your great-grandmother, took the watch off, put it an old coffee can, and in that can it stayed 'til your granddad Dane Coolidge was called upon by his country to go overseas and fight the Germans once again. This time they called it World War II. Your great-grandfather gave this watch to your granddad for good luck. Unfortunately, Dane's luck wasn't as good as his old man's. Dane was a Marine and he was killed -- along with the other Marines at the battle of Wake Island. Your granddad was facing death, he knew it. None of those boys had any illusions about ever leavin' that island alive. So three days before the Japanese took the island, your granddad asked a gunner on an Air Force transport name of Winocki, a man he had never met before in his life, to deliver to his infant son, who he'd never seen in the flesh, his gold watch. Three days later, your granddad was dead. But Winocki kept his word. After the war was over, he paid a visit to your grandmother, delivering to your infant father, his Dad's gold watch. This watch. (holds it up, long pause) This watch was on your Daddy's wrist when he was shot down over Hanoi. He was captured, put in a Vietnamese prison camp. He knew if the gooks ever saw the watch it'd be confiscated, taken away. The way your Dad looked at it, that watch was your birthright. He'd be damned if any slopes were gonna put their greasy yella hands on his boy's birthright. So he hid it in the one place he knew he could hide something. His ass. Five long years, he wore this watch up his ass. Then he died of dysentery, he gave me the watch. I hid this uncomfortable hunk of metal up my ass two years. Then, after seven years, I was sent home to my family. And now, little man, I give the watch to you.

  8. #7
    Member Anville's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    436

    Re: Handing down watches - how important?

    Evertime I see a Zenith El Primero classic chrono, I can imagine giving something like that to my son, when he turns 18 or 21 or whatever.

    Id probabaly buy him a seiko whatnot when hes 15, and give him my theory on how having a watch says things about you (that you have places to be etc) and ingrain it in him.

    However, Id find it difficult to hand down, say a Rolex or Omega to my daughter. Im I alone here?

  9. #8
    Member jhowton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    1,610

    Re: Handing down watches - how important?

    I buy watches because I like them. I have given my kids a love of watches and have helped them buy some of what they like. If I have any of my collection left when I die, I hope that my kids will value them over their economic value and decide to keep them, however I'll never know.

  10. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,339

    Re: Handing down watches - how important?

    Incase you did not want to read all of that.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKuDYbnXBJQ

  11. #10
    vandice
    Guest

    Re: Handing down watches - how important?

    Quote Originally Posted by caffeinated View Post
    For the sake of discussion, some questions I've been pondering in relation to buying my next watch. Will it be a true tool watch like the Marathon SAR? A more expensive, timeless beauty with tool-like qualities, like a Planet Ocean or Seadweller?

    When buying an automatic watch, how much consideration do you give to handing down the watch to the next generation?

    Think about the watches you own, which ones would you will pass on to one of your kids? Would it be worth anything, beyond the sentimenatal value? Say you wear a Seiko or Marathon diver all your life, when you pass it on to your son, he values it because he saw you wear it all your life. A generation or two later, essentially it's a beat up old watch. Not worth getting fixed. Substitute "rolex" for "seiko" and the story is different, (not arguing the right or wrong of it, it just is.) Does this weigh in your decision at all? What watch brands do you think qualify in this regard?

    I have to say it matters in my decision. I have two sons and I have one nice watch. I'm going to get another watch that I will alternate wear with. One day these will go to my boys. I want the boys to fight over them. (Kidding.) A couple of generations down the road it I think it would be nice if someone was holding up my watch and thinking about "great-grandpa."

    Steve
    I may get hell for this but lemme offer an unpopular viewpoint.

    A car costs way more than a watch, even one of those overpriced Swissie. Will you handmedown a car, even if its a Mercedes or BMW? Most American families own 2 or more cars, and own them for 7-10 years before either scrapping or selling them for a pittance, not to mention taxes, maintenance, fuel along the way. Simply put, we like new things, even for items that have a lot of life left.

    A watch tells time. But time also takes its toll on it. It may be more personal than a car (you can't wear a car no?) but I dare bet a future watch 20 years down the road will be a much better proposition than today's offering.

    So for purely practical reasons, my answer to the qn posted is no.

    Unless the watch is a heirloom item (e.g. something kept unworn or regarded as an antique) or with some history (this piece of 316L went with dad to Iraq and back. It even dodged a bullet for me!), I will treat a watch as a regular use item and not worry too much about it.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •