Harvard Business article: re-emergence of mechanical watches
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  1. #1
    Member flyingpicasso's Avatar
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    Harvard Business article: re-emergence of mechanical watches

    This is an exerpt from a research article in this week's Harvard Business School newsletter...most of it is well-trod ground, but there is still some interesting history that some may not know. I found the part re: Zenith particularly interesting!
    "What this research suggests is that it is possible to prolong the life of some technologies, along with the organizations and communities that support them”
    Take, for example, the mechanical wristwatch. Swiss watchmakers dominated the industry for centuries until the mid-1970s, when the Japanese introduced low cost production methods to manufacture highly accurate quartz watches. Swiss business historians refer to this as the "Quartz Crisis." Companies like Seiko and Casio seized the quartz market. By 1983, two-thirds of the watch industry jobs in Switzerland had disappeared, and the country was producing only 10 percent of the world's watches. Yet Switzerland has reemerged as the global leader of watch exports (by export value), due to a newfound market demand for old-style mechanical watches.

    This curious comeback story has led Ryan Raffaelli to ask how organizations, industries, and technologies re-emerge from the brink of collapse. And while his initial research has focused on the watch industry, his findings also help explain a recent resurgence of independent bookstores, a renaissance of streetcars in numerous urban city centers, and the revival of several seemingly archaic products including the fountain pen and the vinyl record.

    "What this research suggests is that it is possible to prolong the life of some technologies, along with the organizations and communities that support them," says Raffaelli, an assistant professor in the Organizational Behavior unit at Harvard Business School.

    "Successful companies may be able to reposition a 'dying' technology by redefining its identity and value for the customer."
    Raffaelli details his research in the paper Mechanisms of Technology Re-Emergence and Identity Change in a Mature Field: Swiss Watchmaking, 1970-2008. Based on his doctoral thesis, the paper discusses the role of key individuals, organizations, and industry associations in bringing a technology back to life. The paper explains that the successful re-emergence of an old technology relies on several factors: the opportunity to redefine the technology's value; an organization's acceptance of the new definition; an entire industry's buy-in of the same; and a healthy tension between those pushing for innovation and those protecting the technology's legacy.
    Redefining a product's value

    As their industry hit the skids, Swiss watchmakers realized they could no longer cite time-keeping precision as the main selling point of a handcrafted mechanical watch, Raffaelli explains. Quartz enabled mass-produced accuracy on the cheap. A revival depended on a new reason to embrace the older technology.

    
    
    
    
    
    
    The mechanical watchmaking revival began when Nicolas Hayek, a former management consultant, bought up several of the industry's suffering brands and production companies and consolidated them into the Societe Suisse de Microelectronique et d'Horlogerie (SMH). The former CEO of one of those companies, Ernst Tompke, then proposed the idea of a low-cost quartz design that would compete in the market not on precision, but on fashion. SMH pursued the risky idea, but the project's young engineers, Elmar Mock and Jacque Muller, found themselves ostracized by many of their skeptical colleagues.

    In 1983, SMH launched its brand of colorful Swatch watches. A portmanteau of "second watch," Swatch essentially introduced the idea of an inexpensive quartz watch as a fashion accessory. The strategy was wildly successful, with sales exceeding 50 million units by 1988. But rather than continue to rely solely on cheap quartz watches, SMH and other Swiss watchmakers used the success as an opportunity to reintroduce mechanical watches to the market. This time they were advertised not simply as precision timepieces, but as carefully crafted luxury items tied to a centuries-old tradition.

    Again, the strategy worked. SMH eventually became Swatch Group, which saw sales of more than CHF 8 billion in 2012. In addition to Swatch, the company owns prestige brands such as Breguet, Blancpain, and Omega, whose watches can sell for upwards of $100,000 apiece.
    Raffaelli describes this strategy in terms of coupling: an initial strong coupling of product and organizational identity, a temporary de-coupling from both the old technology and original identity, and a subsequent re-coupling with the old technology—but with a new organizational identity.
    "The fashion period served as a cleansing of the palate for Swiss watchmaking, like a sorbet served between two large portions of a meal" Raffaelli says. "It was a chance to reset. It bought them enough time to reposition who they were as an industry. Watches have moved from being precision instruments to prestige luxury items. Luxury was always part of the industry, but now it's responsible for much of the growth trajectory."
    The guardians and the entrepreneurs

    So how did the Swiss watchmakers know when to re-embrace mechanical watches? According to several industry CEOs that Raffaelli interviewed for his research, the industry received a wake-up call from a small but loyal group of purists: mechanical watch collectors.

    "When things looked really bad for the mechanical watch industry, when the industry seemed on the verge of collapse, watch collectors started buying mechanical watches at auction at record prices," Raffaelli explains. "This sent a signal to the industry that aha, there may still be latent value in what they thought was a dead technology. And so these collectors become almost like canaries in a coalmine, in a good way. They sent a signal of hope that there might still be value there."

    It turned out that some players within the industry had been holding on to the old technology all along, too. Raffaelli recounts the story of Zenith, which, like many Swiss watch companies, decided to throw away all of its mechanical watchmaking moulds in the midst of the quartz crisis. But one veteran employee couldn't stand the idea of scrapping these historical production tools, and took the liberty to hide them in a shed at the back of the factory.

    A few years later, mechanical watchmaking was back in vogue. Now under new ownership, Zenith realized the need to revisit the old technology, which, fortunately for the owners, had been hiding in a shed all along.

    "At that point this old employee returns and says, 'I preserved all the dies and technical drawings, and I will reintroduce them to you,'" Raffaelli explains. "The lesson for managers is that leadership as a catalyst for re-emergence has to take place not only at the industry level and the organizational level, but right on the factory floors."

    Raffaelli describes the watch collectors and the old employee as institutional guardians, who encourage preservation of past technologies and traditions in the face of change. These guardians serve as a counterbalance to institutional entrepreneurs, who push for organizational and industry change at all costs. He maintains that both are necessary for successful re-emergence. The tension between the two creates what he calls identity ambidexterity—holding on to the values and capabilities of the past while at the same time recognizing the need to adapt to the future.

    "A lot of companies fail because they cannot do both things simultaneously," he says. "Here we have an example of a whole industry that managed to do both, and to navigate a comeback."
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  2. #2
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    Re: Harvard Business article: re-emergence of mechanical watches

    Adapt or die. Darwin would be proud. On an unrelated note, I want to know who that employee was at Zenith so I can give him a big 'ol pat on the back and a bigger glass of whatever he wants to drink.

    -hayday
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    Re: Harvard Business article: re-emergence of mechanical watches

    Quote Originally Posted by hayday View Post
    I want to know who that employee was at Zenith so I can give him a big 'ol pat on the back and a bigger glass of whatever he wants to drink.-hayday
    My thoughts exactly!

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    Re: Harvard Business article: re-emergence of mechanical watches

    This article has one major flaw in it. It states "Swiss watchmakers dominated the industry for centuries until the mid-1970s..." which is incorrect. U.S. watchmakers were the dominant players in the industry until well after WWII. Bulova, Hamilton, Elgin, Waltham, Timex - all were major U.S. manufacturers, among others.

    And this is what Harvard is turning out these days? Business majors educated with revisionist history. Ugh....

    Mike
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    Re: Harvard Business article: re-emergence of mechanical watches

    It seems like the old adage of "what's old is new again" is as true here as it is in many areas of fashion and design. I think what's fascinating about the watch story isn't just the interest in older design, but maintaining and even refining technology which is essentially outdated, but is still being sold right next to and often for much more money than new watch technology that can do a lot of really neat things---heck Samsung has a watch that is essentially tethered to you cell phone. And yet, I don't see a time where anyone will want to go back to the old days of cell phones with their limited capabilities and functionality. It's a virtual impossibility that car manufacturers will ever go back to carburators. The en vogue thing for many car collectors who lust after that vintage car is to replace the guts with modern hardware and save or modestly update the body. It's quite brilliant (see companies like Singer or Icon). And yet, never in a million years would most serious watch people ever consider a situation where their antiquated mechanical movement is replaced with a modern quartz movement. Watches are a real interesting mix of engineering precision, design, art, and personal preference to the highest degree.

    I wish I could have somehow integrated my interest in watches (or cars) into my thesis like the gentleman mentioned in the article---that would have been some amazingly fascinating research, I'm sure. And the connections you likely develop in the course of such research must be amazing.
    Last edited by ShortOnTime3; January 10th, 2014 at 23:44.
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    Re: Harvard Business article: re-emergence of mechanical watches

    Is Larry Summers still there?
    Quote Originally Posted by mjbernier View Post
    This article has one major flaw in it. It states "Swiss watchmakers dominated the industry for centuries until the mid-1970s..." which is incorrect. U.S. watchmakers were the dominant players in the industry until well after WWII. Bulova, Hamilton, Elgin, Waltham, Timex - all were major U.S. manufacturers, among others.

    And this is what Harvard is turning out these days? Business majors educated with revisionist history. Ugh....

    Mike

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    Member flyingpicasso's Avatar
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    Re: Harvard Business article: re-emergence of mechanical watches

    Quote Originally Posted by Watchbreath View Post
    Is Larry Summers still there?
    Yes...as professor and President Emeritus.

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    Re: Harvard Business article: re-emergence of mechanical watches

    That pretty much says it all about that place.
    Quote Originally Posted by flyingpicasso View Post
    Yes...as professor and President Emeritus.

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    Re: Harvard Business article: re-emergence of mechanical watches

    I'm not sure I believe the bit about Zenith, but cool article nonetheless.
    Watches

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    Re: Harvard Business article: re-emergence of mechanical watches

    While I am by no means an expert on any of this, the bit about Zenith seems very plausible. I have been looking at many vintage Zeniths recently, and through my rudimentary research into movements, etc., I have learned that Zenith did indeed re-invent the wheel about 20 years ago when they were taken over by a new management team that was determined to return the watchmaker to its mechanical roots. When the quartz revolution hit, many Swiss and German companies switched to making more quartz movements and simply scaled back their mechanical production, but Zenith essentially abandoned it. Obviously, this transition was easier for some and harder for others, some companies closed their doors, others adapted, and some new companies were born. It was, therefore, an easier transition for, say, Omega to ramp up production of mechanical movements once it figured out how to co-exist with quartz, while Zenith was at a serious disadvantage and having to start back at square one.

    I don't know about the nitty gritty details, but I believe the fundamentals of the story.

    -hayday
    The pessimist says it can't get any worse, while the optimist says it can.

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