Help buying a skeleton watch
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: Help buying a skeleton watch

Page 1 of 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 84
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    43

    Help buying a skeleton watch

    I've decided I love skeleton watches, and also that they're within my relatively low price range. So I've set about finding one to buy. I'm not too interested in things like brand heritage or country of manufacture, as it's sort of throwing money away when I don't care that much about watches. I'm mainly basing my purchase on looks, then.
    Oddly enough, I've found that the best looking watch in my opinion is a somewhat cheap one from a relatively unknown brand, Theorema.
    Link
    The problem is that I'm unable to find out any information about the brand, including whether or not they even exist. This brings up questions concerning things like reliability and quality.

    So my question is this: does anyone know any useful information about this brand or watch? Or could you perhaps link me to some reputable (though not too costly) brands that make skeleton watches, so that I may browse?

    Thanks for all your help :D

    Edit: another thing. I've read some places something about winding the watch, and something about a 36 hour power reserve. Does this mean I need to wind it for it to run? Is this common on these type of watches? I assumed they were all battery powered these days, or had some other means of power rather than having to be manually wound up. I don't like the idea of having to wind it, and set it if it runs out of power.
    Last edited by Nauraushaun; January 1st, 2011 at 11:46.

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    637

    Re: Help buying a skeleton watch

    Quote Originally Posted by Nauraushaun View Post
    I've decided I love skeleton watches, and also that they're within my relatively low price range. So I've set about finding one to buy. I'm not too interested in things like brand heritage or country of manufacture, as it's sort of throwing money away when I don't care that much about watches. I'm mainly basing my purchase on looks, then.

    Oddly enough, I've found that the best looking watch in my opinion is a somewhat cheap one from a relatively unknown brand, Theorema.
    Country of manufacture may make you care, after the thing falls apart or doesn't work to begin with. I won't do research on this brand, but it looks like a germasian brand. This usually means company based in Germany, watches made in Asia, quite cheap to buy, but not really worth anything.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nauraushaun View Post
    The problem is that I'm unable to find out any information about the brand, including whether or not they even exist. This brings up questions concerning things like reliability and quality.
    Allow me to nitpick: if you can't find out anything about it, not even if they exist, then it is not a "relatively unknown" brand, not even a brand. "Watch, skeleton, no brand"

    Quote Originally Posted by Nauraushaun View Post
    Edit: another thing. I've read some places something about winding the watch, and something about a 36 hour power reserve. Does this mean I need to wind it for it to run? Is this common on these type of watches? I assumed they were all battery powered these days, or had some other means of power rather than having to be manually wound up. I don't like the idea of having to wind it, and set it if it runs out of power.
    Well, yes, most skeletons are handwind (especially the cheap and nasty variation you seem to be looking for). Did you expect them to be quartz? Look up some pictures of quartz movements and tell me if you want to wear that visibly on your wrist. Most mechanicals today are automatic, meaning they wind themselves up using the movements of your wrist, but some also need to be handwound.

    Seeing how you know nothing about mechanical watches, I should probably also tell you that they usually need to be set whether or not they run out of power. Mechanical watches are not as accurate as quartz, so they can deviate to about 20 seconds a day. Most do better, though.

    The link you posted mentions "automatic movement stored on 25 jewels", impressivelly showing they have no clue either. It's not automatic, it seems to be a chinese copy of a swiss movement with 17 jewels.

    225$ is too much. For that you can buy a very nice Seiko automatic watch, or a very nice quartz watch (possibly with radio synchronisation or solar power). If I may offer a piece of advice: don't buy that thing. You'll pay too much for a flimsy thing that will very likely give you a completely wrong idea about mechanical watches. Buy a nice quartz, citizen, casio, seiko etc.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    43

    Re: Help buying a skeleton watch

    I understand that all watches need to be set, as well as deviations and all that. I would like an accurate watch though, if the watch is running noticeably out of time once a week or so, I can imagine it wouldn't feel as quality as one you don't have to keep resetting.

    So quartz watches are more accurate than mechanical, but most skeletons are mechanical? I had a quick look on Google Images of some quartz watches. Interestingly the watch I've been looking at showed up, but also some such as this, which in my opinion looks too cluttered and not as nice. Is this what I should expect from quartz watches?
    I also saw the Stuhrling Original Winchester in the pictures, I liked that, would that be quartz do you think?

    Rest assured, I can get it for about $150 after looking around.
    Radio synchronisation?

    It's hard to believe that something which looks so well made could be referred to as flimsy. That said, I trust your judgement, that's why I came to a watch forum. The fact that you know what 25 jewels means pretty much validates your opinion in my mind ;)

  4. Remove Advertisements
    WatchUSeek.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Member AndrewSo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    1,199

    Re: Help buying a skeleton watch

    Here's me being honest:

    $225 is about $200 too expensive for a Chinese skeleton. My housemate bought one on Ebay for a total of $10. The build quality is absolutely appalling but it's intricately built and he claims that it's accurate. My largest issue with skeletons is legibility. Besides, I find that exhibition casebacks to be far more elegant.
    "...[A] watch isn’t about telling the time, it is about your relationship with time. A watch is about style, a story and the history of both your watch and your own life."
    -Askmen.com's The Watch Snob

  6. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    43

    Re: Help buying a skeleton watch

    Well for $10, if it's half decent then you're on a winner.
    What do you mean exhibition casebacks?

  7. #6
    Member Sodiac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Maryland USA
    Posts
    4,620

    Re: Help buying a skeleton watch

    If you want a very nice skeleton watch for under $200.00, I'd suggest this Sea-Gull M182SK. It's made in China and Sea-Gull watches have a good reputation with owners; see the WUS Chinese watch forum for more info.

    A "skeleton" watch is, for all practical purposes, a mechanical watch that has a decorated movement and "see-through" face/dial/case so watch lovers can admire the beautiful and intricate workings. Owning a mechanical watch means you will be much more involved with your watch; setting it, winding it, admiring it...and reading the time.

    The electronic module that powers a quartz watch usually isn't something of beauty; thus, an open-face watch that would allow you to look at the module doesn't really make sense (although there are a few exceptions).

    Sodiac
    Too many watches, only two wrists and never enough time...

  8. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    43

    Re: Help buying a skeleton watch

    Ah, thank you, very helpful there with the information about open-face quartz watches. I am willing to sacrifice over-all accuracy in the name of spectacular design.

    That watch is very, very nice, and very similar to what I've been after. It is a bit out of my price-range, as I was looking to spend a bit less if possible. I also don't particularly like that it brags on the face about being "China made". As far as I'm concerned all the cheapest things come from China; cheap cables and electronics, and the world's worst cars. I don't mind a Chinese watch, but I don't need it to tell me about it every day.

    One thing confused me about that page. In its categories it lists both "automatic" and "mechanical" watches. I was under the impression that watches of this type were either mechanical or quartz, and that "automatic" referred to whether or not the watch was self-winding. In which case an automatic watch could be either mechanical or quartz, and the groups aren't mutually exclusive.
    That is...automatic watches could be mechanical, and you can't split them into separate groups.

    At this stage I'm extremely open to any recommendations. I can browse the web, but without a decent knowledge of which brands are which, which are pricey, where they're made, and which brands are quality...it's hard.
    Last edited by Nauraushaun; January 2nd, 2011 at 13:53.

  9. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    637

    Re: Help buying a skeleton watch

    Quote Originally Posted by Nauraushaun View Post
    I understand that all watches need to be set, as well as deviations and all that. I would like an accurate watch though, if the watch is running noticeably out of time once a week or so, I can imagine it wouldn't feel as quality as one you don't have to keep resetting.

    So quartz watches are more accurate than mechanical, but most skeletons are mechanical? I had a quick look on Google Images of some quartz watches. Interestingly the watch I've been looking at showed up, but also some such as this, which in my opinion looks too cluttered and not as nice. Is this what I should expect from quartz watches?
    I also saw the Stuhrling Original Winchester in the pictures, I liked that, would that be quartz do you think?
    No. What you see (and like) in these images of skeletons are all the workings of a mechanical movement. None of them are quartz, if advertised as such, the seller is clearly clueless. A quartz watch looks nothing like that, it's more or less just a piece of electronics, a PCB board and some mechanical parts. You could look inside your computer to get an idea of how a quartz skeleton might look like. Here's an example of a quartz movement:



    The image of the skeleton you provided however is a real high-value skeleton, that's a good one. It may look cluttered but that is the point of a skeleton, besides, this is the rear view, it may look quite a bit cleaner from the front.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nauraushaun View Post
    Rest assured, I can get it for about $150 after looking around.
    Radio synchronisation?
    150 is still too expensive. I wouldn't pay 10 bucks for something like that.

    Radio synchronisation: I probably should have said "radio controlled", since it is a better known term. The quartz watches with this technology use a radio time signal (available in Europe, US, China, Japan...) to synchronise time with an atomic clock. The result is that - as long as the reception is good enough to allow the watch to synchronise daily - the watch is accurate to a second (actually fractions of a second) all the time without needing to be set at all.

    I think this is what you should go for. Do a search for Citizen Eco-Drive and radio controlled. Eco-Drive means it charges its battery with solar power, so you don't need to replace the battery or set the time. That's a much better value and I think you'll be more pleased with this kind of watch.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nauraushaun View Post
    It's hard to believe that something which looks so well made could be referred to as flimsy. That said, I trust your judgement, that's why I came to a watch forum. The fact that you know what 25 jewels means pretty much validates your opinion in my mind ;)
    Well, I know a bit more than that too :). These watches may look well made to a layperson, but there is more than meets the eye here. Not that I could tell that it's crap just by looking at it, but I have read lots of reports that it makes me conclude that you can fully expect it to be crap. These decorations are machine-applied and nothing special, nor do they add to the quality. The build quality however is often quite apalling. Mechanical watches are incredibly precise little machines and need to be made well to function well. Lots of these watches are made with an appalling neglect. Often dry (not oiled at all), with dirt in the bearings, bent, scratched or rusty parts, misaligned plates etc. Everything from the book of sins in watchmaking. Life expectancy of such watches is just barely past sale, and sometimes not even that long, quite of number of them are dead on arrival. Puzzlingly, people who buy such watches don't seem to mind. Being cheap, they just throw them away and buy another one.

    Sea-gull (which was recommended to you in another post, and I think is a good recommendation) is a serious chinese watch manufacturer, their watches are at least good quality. They have quite a high level of production, so they also have a lot of rejects. This is where these other chinese "brands", often called mushroom or ebay brands, source their materials: they basically pick movements off the waste tip. And attempt to sell them to impressionable people (i.e. you :) ) for more than a good quality Sea-Gull would cost.

  10. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    586

    Re: Help buying a skeleton watch

    Try this web site they have a plethera of watches your looking for.

    Skeleton Watches - Unique Watches from Watchismo.com

    Cheers
    Mark.

  11. #10
    Member brandon\'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    10,601

    Re: Help buying a skeleton watch

    Welcome to WUS. You are miles ahead of the watch buying public for at least doing some research before buying.

    I'll address one of your questions that nobody else has yet:

    Quote Originally Posted by Nauraushaun View Post
    One thing confused me about that page. In its categories it lists both "automatic" and "mechanical" watches. I was under the impression that watches of this type were either mechanical or quartz, and that "automatic" referred to whether or not the watch was self-winding. In which case an automatic watch could be either mechanical or quartz, and the groups aren't mutually exclusive.
    That is...automatic watches could be mechanical, and you can't split them into separate groups.
    There are essentially two types of watches: quartz and mechanical.

    -- Quartz run on batteries. They are the type of watches that 99% of people are familiar with.

    -- Mechanical watches are powered by a wound-up spring. The energy from the spring is translated to keeping track of the time via sprockets and levers. There are two types of mechanical: handwind and automatic. Handwind is just that; the mainspring is wound by manually turning, or winding, the crown. Automatics are wound by an off-balanced rotor that rotates with the movement of your arm as you wear them. And some automatics also have the ability to be hand wound, as well.

    To further address your question about accuracy of a watch: generally quartz are more accurate than mechanical. There is a segment of quartz watches on the market that are referred to as "high-end quartz." Those watches are accurate to within about 10 seconds per year. And like was mentioned earlier, there are quartz watches that are capable of receiving a time signal that never deviate more than 1 second provided they receive the signal every night; those are NOT considered "high-end quartz." And then you have mechanicals. For the sake of argument, the most commonly known mid- to high-end mechanicals is Rolex. They can be regulated by a skill watchmaker to be accurate to within a one or two seconds a day; and some are Chronometers, which are regulated from the factory. But generally, it is considered normal for mechanicals to deviate up to 10 seconds, or even more, per day. Thus, you can get a "radio controlled" Casio for under $30 dollars that is far more accurate than a $5,000 Rolex.

    I hope that was clear as mud.

    ...

    As for a recommendation, which is why you came here to begin with: look into Fossil skeleton watches. They have great customer service and are easily accessible.

    Good luck with your search.
    "Oh, nice. So now we're quoting other people to sound deep." -alx007

Page 1 of 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •