Hoarding ETA2824 movements

Thread: Hoarding ETA2824 movements

Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    WnS
    WnS is offline
    Member WnS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    4,956

    Hoarding ETA2824 movements

    I have noticed these for sale for around $150. Now given the high cost of a movement refurbishment and Swatch Group cutting off their supply, would it be a cost saving measure to buy a few just in case? Would these ETA movements actually appreciate in value over time? Or would some company manage to create decent quality mass copies of these for cheaper in the future (patents have expired)?
    Last edited by WnS; December 17th, 2011 at 17:00.
    I'm content with my watch collection

  2. #2
    Member Spit161's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Posts
    5,873

    Re: Hoarding ETA2824 movements

    This is an interesting question you propose.
    I can see your point about whole movements becoming more valuable over time, however, I think the price of the individual parts would far​ out way the price of the whole movement.

    To this end, the biggest issue in my opinion is the amount of watchmakers whose staple movement are those from ETA. These watchmakers would loose their supply chain, and thus any business (that requires new parts). I think this is paving the way for more companies to move to other alternatives, like Sellita. They make "clones" of the current ETA movements.

    But, whilst at my AD the other week, I was told that ETA have said they will let the company have the Ébauche (branded with ETA logo/name) and that the company are not able to modify the movement with their own branding, like Breitling etc.. do now.

    cheers,
    Jake.
    Breitling Super Avenger
    Breitling SuperOcean
    Bremont MBII
    Bremont ALT1-P
    Casio G-Shock Aviator GW-3000B
    Omega Seamaster 2541.80
    Seiko Black Monster
    Seiko SKX007
    Suunto Core "All Black"
    Suunto Core Alpine Edition
    Suunto Vector
    Tissot Sea-Touch.


    "When the weight of the paper equals the weight of the airplane, only then you can go flying."



  3. #3
    WnS
    WnS is offline
    Member WnS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    4,956

    Re: Hoarding ETA2824 movements

    Quote Originally Posted by Spit161 View Post
    This is an interesting question you propose.
    I can see your point about whole movements becoming more valuable over time, however, I think the price of the individual parts would far​ out way the price of the whole movement.
    Let me put it this way. Servicing is ridiculously expensive, especially for established Swiss brands and is recommended every 5 years. Expect $300-1000. If would be cheaper to let your ETA watch's movement wear itself to death and get your local watchmaker to re-oil that 15 year old unused ETA and pop it in your watch.

    EDIT: Take a Longines Hydroconquest for instance, nice watch but in 15 years, the movement breaks, but the entire watch would be worth bugger all at this point to warrant a proper repair by Longines. The watch still has sentimental value. Who cares if the movement isn't Longines branded. Pop in an unused ETA and it's good to go.
    Last edited by WnS; December 17th, 2011 at 17:17.
    I'm content with my watch collection

  4. Remove Advertisements
    WatchUSeek.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Member Spit161's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Posts
    5,873

    Re: Hoarding ETA2824 movements

    Quote Originally Posted by WnS View Post
    EDIT: Take a Longines Hydroconquest for instance, nice watch but in 15 years, the movement breaks, but the entire watch would be worth bugger all at this point to warrant a proper repair by Longines. The watch still has sentimental value. Who cares if the movement isn't Longines branded. Pop in an unused ETA and it's good to go.
    I'd agree with "popping" the Ébauche in would be better than a repair, but your OP was about money, and that's what I answered.
    Your now modified OP is a different question.

    cheers,
    Jake.
    Breitling Super Avenger
    Breitling SuperOcean
    Bremont MBII
    Bremont ALT1-P
    Casio G-Shock Aviator GW-3000B
    Omega Seamaster 2541.80
    Seiko Black Monster
    Seiko SKX007
    Suunto Core "All Black"
    Suunto Core Alpine Edition
    Suunto Vector
    Tissot Sea-Touch.


    "When the weight of the paper equals the weight of the airplane, only then you can go flying."



  6. #5
    Member lysanderxiii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    N 32 deg, 47' 27.9168"; W 79 deg, 54' 30.3372"
    Posts
    8,842

    Re: Hoarding ETA2824 movements

    Quote Originally Posted by WnS View Post
    Let me put it this way. Servicing is ridiculously expensive, especially for established Swiss brands and is recommended every 5 years. Expect $300-1000. If would be cheaper to let your ETA watch's movement wear itself to death and get your local watchmaker to re-oil that 15 year old unused ETA and pop it in your watch.

    EDIT: Take a Longines Hydroconquest for instance, nice watch but in 15 years, the movement breaks, but the entire watch would be worth bugger all at this point to warrant a proper repair by Longines. The watch still has sentimental value. Who cares if the movement isn't Longines branded. Pop in an unused ETA and it's good to go.
    A 15 year old unused movement would have 15 year old oil, so you're back where you started - with a watch that needs a service.....

    But, I hope the price does sky-rocket, maybe those five unused 2824-2 I have will be worth something....
    Last edited by lysanderxiii; December 17th, 2011 at 19:55.
    familiaritas parit contemptum; raritate admiratione wins.- Lucius Apuleius
    est necessry, accurate ad secundo? - Lysander magna
    iustum est horologium - Obscurus Genius

  7. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    San Jose, California-USA
    Posts
    37,259

    Re: Hoarding ETA2824 movements

    If you were a watchmaker, what would you charge?
    Quote Originally Posted by WnS View Post
    Let me put it this way. Servicing is ridiculously expensive, especially for established Swiss brands and is recommended every 5 years. Expect $300-1000. If would be cheaper to let your ETA watch's movement wear itself to death and get your local watchmaker to re-oil that 15 year old unused ETA and pop it in your watch.

    EDIT: Take a Longines Hydroconquest for instance, nice watch but in 15 years, the movement breaks, but the entire watch would be worth bugger all at this point to warrant a proper repair by Longines. The watch still has sentimental value. Who cares if the movement isn't Longines branded. Pop in an unused ETA and it's good to go.

  8. #7
    Moderator Public Forum John MS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    21,280

    Re: Hoarding ETA2824 movements

    Quote Originally Posted by WnS View Post
    I have noticed these for sale for around $150. Now given the high cost of a movement refurbishment and Swatch Group cutting off their supply, would it be a cost saving measure to buy a few just in case? Would these ETA movements actually appreciate in value over time? Or would some company manage to create decent quality mass copies of these for cheaper in the future (patents have expired)?
    As noted a 20 year old movement would still need service so any profit would be gobbled up. Well, the 2824 and it's cousins are mass produced movements and yes there are companies mass producing movements that provide comparable functionality right now. Selitta is making some equivalent movements right now and at least one chinese company is making what are currently inferior quality movements. Look for the chinese to rapidly improve quality as the opportunity to fill ETA's shoes expands. There is really nothing inherently special about ETA movements that would make them desiable to watch manufacturers over others that I can think of. The only reason I can think of to buy a bunch of those movements would be if you got a good wholesale price and were intending on using them right now in line of watches. Any watches you have with ETA movements will likely be running 100 years from now with decent service so there is no need to buy back-up movements.
    Last edited by John MS; December 17th, 2011 at 20:23.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •