Non-handwinding auto mvmnt?

Thread: Non-handwinding auto mvmnt?

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  1. #1
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    Non-handwinding auto mvmnt?

    How common are automatic movements that do not hand-wind? I have an Orient that does not &, since I don't wear it much, it is very annoying to not be able to get it fully wound when I want to wear it. BTW It winds in both directions of the rotor. I read that a Rolex accumulates 3 min of run time for each turn of the rotor. Assuming that the watch has a 48hr reserve, that would mean around 960 revolutions to get it fully wound!!! Anyone know if this is common? Do most automatics gain power from normal activity, or do they just keep up? Wish it had a power reserve meter. Seems like a power reserve complication should be requisite for an auto without a crown gear.

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    kev
    I just think that things should work the way I expect them to.
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    Member Lemaniac40's Avatar
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    Re: Non-handwinding auto mvmnt?

    Quote Originally Posted by bugeyed View Post
    How common are automatic movements that do not hand-wind? I have an Orient that does not &, since I don't wear it much, it is very annoying to not be able to get it fully wound when I want to wear it. BTW It winds in both directions of the rotor. I read that a Rolex accumulates 3 min of run time for each turn of the rotor. Assuming that the watch has a 48hr reserve, that would mean around 960 revolutions to get it fully wound!!! Anyone know if this is common? Do most automatics gain power from normal activity, or do they just keep up? Wish it had a power reserve meter. Seems like a power reserve complication should be requisite for an auto without a crown gear.

    Cheers,
    kev
    The Seiko 7s2x cal. do not handwind, I wish they did. Supposedly they are so confident in their bi-directional rotor (magic lever) that they did not think HW was needed. I have not found this to be true. Some of Their new movements have the HW capability.

    I guess maybe the Orients use similar....

  3. #3
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    Re: Non-handwinding auto mvmnt?

    Quote Originally Posted by bugeyed View Post
    How common are automatic movements that do not hand-wind?
    Every Seiko 5, so extremely common indeed. Not to mention Orients as you mention.
    I read that a Rolex accumulates 3 min of run time for each turn of the rotor. Assuming that the watch has a 48hr reserve, that would mean around 960 revolutions to get it fully wound!!! Anyone know if this is common?
    I'd say so. I think the Rolex needs more like 700 or so turns, which is similar to other time-and-date movements like ETA and Seiko.
    Do most automatics gain power from normal activity, or do they just keep up?
    Depends how active you are, entirely, and how you define "normal activity".

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    CMW & Sales Moderator gigfy's Avatar
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    Re: Non-handwinding auto mvmnt?

    Just give a few swirls and strap it on. It will run just fine and wind up as you wear it for the day.

    cheers,
    gigfy
    Just to name a few:
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    Seiko White Stargate SKZ323
    Hamilton Pioneer Mechanical H60419533
    Hamilton Limited Edition Pocket Watch H51459013
    Timex Camper Mechanical (May 1991)

    -Gone
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  6. #5
    Moderator Public Forum John MS's Avatar
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    Re: Non-handwinding auto mvmnt?

    Quote Originally Posted by bugeyed View Post
    How common are automatic movements that do not hand-wind? I have an Orient that does not &, since I don't wear it much, it is very annoying to not be able to get it fully wound when I want to wear it. BTW It winds in both directions of the rotor. I read that a Rolex accumulates 3 min of run time for each turn of the rotor. Assuming that the watch has a 48hr reserve, that would mean around 960 revolutions to get it fully wound!!! Anyone know if this is common? Do most automatics gain power from normal activity, or do they just keep up? Wish it had a power reserve meter. Seems like a power reserve complication should be requisite for an auto without a crown gear.

    Cheers,
    kev
    It's fairly common among more moderately priced movements. I've found that the rotor winding mechanism on most watches is so efficient that the watch is fully wound in a day of normal wear any way. Regular handwinding to a full state will introduce unneeded and premature wear of the crown and winding mechanism. Just wear it and let the rotor do it's thing.

  7. #6
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    Re: Non-handwinding auto mvmnt?

    Gee, I've been hand winding my Lucien Piccard for 48 years, no, the
    rotor will do it's thing by maintaining spring tension.
    Quote Originally Posted by John MS View Post
    It's fairly common among more moderately priced movements. I've found that the rotor winding mechanism on most watches is so efficient that the watch is fully wound in a day of normal wear any way. Regular handwinding to a full state will introduce unneeded and premature wear of the crown and winding mechanism. Just wear it and let the rotor do it's thing.

  8. #7
    Member DM71's Avatar
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    Re: Non-handwinding auto mvmnt?

    I have many Seiko's with the 7sXX and never had any reserve problems. Their system IS very efficient. When I set the time on them I just have to shake it for 5 sec and it's a go! I would usually shake it for about 1 min. since I usually do my watch swap at night and not wearing the watch while I sleep. I never had a Seiko stopping on me, ever. Whit that said, If I could chose, I would prefer the movement to be windable but it's not a turn off for me, at least, not for Seiko. I have a Parnis Power Reserve with a Seagull MOVT and even that cheap watch gets fully wounded in about 5 hours of wear so...

  9. #8
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    Re: Non-handwinding auto mvmnt?

    Quote Originally Posted by John MS View Post
    It's fairly common among more moderately priced movements. I've found that the rotor winding mechanism on most watches is so efficient that the watch is fully wound in a day of normal wear any way. Regular handwinding to a full state will introduce unneeded and premature wear of the crown and winding mechanism. Just wear it and let the rotor do it's thing.
    What he said - just wear it and go. I never manually wind any automatic watch. Gently shake it for a few seconds to get it going, set the time and wear it. Even if I put one on in the evening for a few hours it'll still be running the next morning, and no watch has ever stopped while I was wearing it.

  10. #9
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    Re: Non-handwinding auto mvmnt?

    I can't remember the last time I wound one of my autos.

  11. #10
    Moderator Public Forum John MS's Avatar
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    Re: Non-handwinding auto mvmnt?

    Quote Originally Posted by Watchbreath View Post
    Gee, I've been hand winding my Lucien Piccard for 48 years, no, the
    rotor will do it's thing by maintaining spring tension.
    I don't understand the phrase "no, the rotor will do it's thing by maintaining rotor tension". The rotor will or will not do it's thing??

    If the rotor is doing it's thing then why handwind? If not then it's overdue for a service.
    Last edited by John MS; April 10th, 2010 at 17:21.

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