Noob reserve power question

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  1. #1
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    Noob reserve power question

    Hi all.

    According to the booklet that came with one of my new watches, it has a power reserve of 40 hours.

    If I understand that correctly, that means that after I take off my watch after a full day of say, 10-12 hours of wearing - it should run for about another 40 hours while sitting on my desk...is that correct?

    Because when I took the watch off yesterday at 4:00 pm or so, it stopped about 19 hours later. Am I missing something?
    - Rolex Tudor Oysterdate chronograph
    - G-shock Gaussman
    - Disney mickey mouse classic...wanted one as a kid, finally got one as an adult
    - Laco auto "A" dial flieger 42 mm (will replace with the 45mm when it comes out in '10)
    - U-boat Classico AS 2 53mm

  2. #2
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    Re: Noob reserve power question

    No, it's about 40 hours total.

  3. #3
    Member Donut's Avatar
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    Re: Noob reserve power question

    40 hours of power reserve means that the watch should run effectively and keep time for 40 hours sitting on your desk provided that the mainspring is fully wound.

    An automatic watch may become completely wound while wearing or may simply hold it's state of wind depending on how active you are.

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  5. #4
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    Re: Noob reserve power question

    Quote Originally Posted by Donut View Post
    40 hours of power reserve means that the watch should run effectively and keep time for 40 hours sitting on your desk provided that the mainspring is fully wound.

    An automatic watch may become completely wound while wearing or may simply hold it's state of wind depending on how active you are.
    So then an automatic that is worn throughout the day as I move out and about should have a fully wound spring, correct? Once I took it off it should have kept running for another 40 hours...unless just wearing the watch doesn't fully wind the spring - perhaps only partially - and it must be manually wound to reach the full reserve.

    BTW, the mechanism is an ETA 2824.

    Assuming for a moment that simply wearing the watch alone can fully wind the mainspring, and it only held time for about 19 hours, would it make sense to take it in for servicing?
    - Rolex Tudor Oysterdate chronograph
    - G-shock Gaussman
    - Disney mickey mouse classic...wanted one as a kid, finally got one as an adult
    - Laco auto "A" dial flieger 42 mm (will replace with the 45mm when it comes out in '10)
    - U-boat Classico AS 2 53mm

  6. #5
    Moderator Public Forum Eric L.'s Avatar
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    Re: Noob reserve power question

    Quote Originally Posted by keeper View Post
    So then an automatic that is worn throughout the day as I move out and about should have a fully wound spring, correct? Once I took it off it should have kept running for another 40 hours...unless just wearing the watch doesn't fully wind the spring - perhaps only partially - and it must be manually wound to reach the full reserve.

    BTW, the mechanism is an ETA 2824.

    Assuming for a moment that simply wearing the watch alone can fully wind the mainspring, and it only held time for about 19 hours, would it make sense to take it in for servicing?
    Sounds like you aren't moving around enough to get it fully wound. Try this: hand wind the movement ~40 winds - that should put it to max power reserve. Then lay it on the desk and see how long it will run. Most ETA 2824's I've owned went a little beyond 40 hours, to around 42-44 hours usually.
    Lots of dive watches.

  7. #6
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    Re: Noob reserve power question

    Quote Originally Posted by keeper View Post
    So then an automatic that is worn throughout the day as I move out and about should have a fully wound spring, correct?
    That really depends on how active you are. I know that when I shake an automatic watch for a few seconds to get it going and then wear it for a few hours it'll always run the following morning. Makes no difference if I wear it for then entire day or if I just put it on when I come home from work. I really don't know if it's fully wound or not, but it has enough power reserve for my needs.

    Quote Originally Posted by keeper View Post
    Assuming for a moment that simply wearing the watch alone can fully wind the mainspring, and it only held time for about 19 hours, would it make sense to take it in for servicing?
    I personally wouldn't take it in for a service just for that. You can always try to fully manually wind the watch (supposedly you can hear the difference in the winding when it's fully wound) and then see how long it runs. If it does run for around 40 hours then there's really nothing wrong with your watch. It just might be that you're not all that active to be able to fully wind the watch during a normal day. However, as long as it runs the following morning and is still keeping reasonable time, that should be good enough.

  8. #7
    Member RJRJRJ's Avatar
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    Re: Noob reserve power question

    Quote Originally Posted by keeper View Post
    So then an automatic that is worn throughout the day as I move out and about should have a fully wound spring, correct? Once I took it off it should have kept running for another 40 hours...unless just wearing the watch doesn't fully wind the spring - perhaps only partially - and it must be manually wound to reach the full reserve.

    BTW, the mechanism is an ETA 2824.

    Assuming for a moment that simply wearing the watch alone can fully wind the mainspring, and it only held time for about 19 hours, would it make sense to take it in for servicing?
    If you wear it long enough, you may be able to wind it fully--but chances are that you are only maintaining the charge that you already have, or slightly increasing it.

  9. #8
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    Re: Noob reserve power question

    Quote Originally Posted by keeper View Post
    So then an automatic that is worn throughout the day as I move out and about should have a fully wound spring, correct? Once I took it off it should have kept running for another 40 hours...unless just wearing the watch doesn't fully wind the spring - perhaps only partially - and it must be manually wound to reach the full reserve.

    BTW, the mechanism is an ETA 2824.

    Assuming for a moment that simply wearing the watch alone can fully wind the mainspring, and it only held time for about 19 hours, would it make sense to take it in for servicing?
    One of my watches exhibited this problem. If I wound it everyday it kept time well.
    However just being worn and relying on the rotor it would lose reserve and time keeping would suffer.
    I sent it in under warranty and now it keeps time well without manual winding.
    I would do as suggested and check reserve after a manual wind and also check the accuracy over several days just relying on the automatic winding.
    If either of these is an issue a service is a good idea.

    Cheers,
    Sean

  10. #9
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    Re: Noob reserve power question

    I was chatting with the Technical Manager at Swatch the other day ("as you do"). He told me that, as part of the servicing procedure, watches are placed upon a kind of windmill device and rotated for up to 6 hours. After this, they are removed and left until they stop. This gives an effective measurement of the power reserve. The point here is that, while 6 hours of rotation may be excessive, a "little bit of desk work and a quick walk around the block" is probably not enough to fully charge a watch. Consequently, unless the watch is regularly and actively worn it may never reach a state of full charge and wont remain working for anything like specification.

    Furthermore, he confirmed that, as a watch discharges, it will tend to run faster. This is because the pendulum has less momentum as a result of a lower spring tension and will tend to oscillate over a narrower angle and will cause a faster tick - nothing much, but it will make a difference. I asked this because I found that my speedy keeps within 1 second a day if I wear it all day and leave it crown up at night. Leaving it on the side for 36 hours (having done some building work) it gained the best part of 15 seconds. He said that this was fairly typical and a function of the above.
    Ian

    Omega Speedmaster Racing ~~~~~ Fast Car ~~~~~ Understanding wife


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