Power Reserves on Automatic Watches
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  1. #1
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    Power Reserves on Automatic Watches

    I find it kinda odd that many watches have very similar power reserves.
    Is this because they source the same supplier for the springs?
    Then there are the oddities that claim to use the same movement, make no mention of any modifications and then have a different power reserve...
    Who decided a power reserve at around 42 hours was sufficient? 72 hours would surely be a better standard no? My work watch comes off on Friday, sits in my drawer all weekend and then needs to be wound before work on Monday.
    You would think they would be able to produce mainsprings with a higher power reserve as standard by now without bumping the costs...
    This applies to both in-house and sourced movements too for some reason.
    There's always room on top.

    My Collection: JLC Reverso Squadra Hometime, Oris BC4 Retrograde Day, Mr Jones Watch The Last Laugh, Louis Erard 1931 Retrograde

  2. #2
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    Re: Power Reserves on Automatic Watches

    Horus decided.

    More like 38 to 42 hours.

  3. #3
    Member little big feather's Avatar
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    Re: Power Reserves on Automatic Watches

    Has to do with the spring in the watch...Some have bigger spring, bigger watch, bigger reserve.
    Some use double stack springs= twice the reserve...I suggest you buy one of these, I suggest Chopard and Eterna.
    Any watches posted may be seen as gifts,borrowed or found property and not as personal property of Little Big Feather.

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    Re: Power Reserves on Automatic Watches

    Blame Canada
    Watchbreath and headless like this.
    Shameful owner of: Nixon Falcon Gunmetal, Seiko SNK803, Field & Stream F-015 (stolen from my father), Invicta 16472 Limited Edition Navigator of the Seas 0001/1021, Skagen who's watch band broke in 2 weeks, "Genuine" Rolex

    RIP my fossil and Nixon Cannon, stolen at a college house party

  6. #5
    Moderator Public Forum John MS's Avatar
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    Re: Power Reserves on Automatic Watches

    Quote Originally Posted by thumos View Post
    I find it kinda odd that many watches have very similar power reserves.
    Is this because they source the same supplier for the springs?
    Then there are the oddities that claim to use the same movement, make no mention of any modifications and then have a different power reserve...
    Who decided a power reserve at around 42 hours was sufficient? 72 hours would surely be a better standard no? My work watch comes off on Friday, sits in my drawer all weekend and then needs to be wound before work on Monday.
    You would think they would be able to produce mainsprings with a higher power reserve as standard by now without bumping the costs...
    This applies to both in-house and sourced movements too for some reason.
    Who decided??? lol! Lotsa people over many decades... Watch makers design most modern watches with the assumption they will be worn every day. Consequently 40 hours maximum reserve is sufficient even if the owner doesn't move around much and the watch isn't fully wound by night time. If you need more then look at the Seiko SARB series which have 48 hours. Beyond that and the watch size will have to get bigger to accommodate a bigger spring. And your wallet will have to get fuller to pay for it.

    Mechanical watches are easy to set running. Additionally they are inaccurate need to have the time reset weekly anyway. So setting it running once a week is really no big deal. The obvious less costly and more accurate alternative is to buy a quartz watch. Or you could wear your watch over the weekend.
    Last edited by John MS; July 31st, 2014 at 20:52.

  7. #6
    Member oklaiss's Avatar
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    Re: Power Reserves on Automatic Watches

    There are many higher end watches that have a full week of power reserve. IWC Portuguese 7 Day for example.
    Rolex Sea Dweller 16600 T-serial
    Omega Speedmaster Professional Mark II 145.014 Cal.861
    Ball Engineer II Red Label GMT GM2026C
    Seiko 6139-6012 1975
    Hamilton Khaki Pilot Day Date Auto
    Invicta 8926ob
    Tag Heuer Professional 200m

  8. #7
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    Re: Power Reserves on Automatic Watches

    Traditionally I think it had a lot to do with the space in the movement/case.

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    Re: Power Reserves on Automatic Watches

    So no one is making a watch with a mainspring that isn't steel? Especially considering the fact that stainless steel tends to deform over time when flexed continuously?
    Anyone know what the alloy of steel is? A quick Google search isn't pulling anything up. They just say "white" alloy.
    Incidentally, they don't cost that much...
    There's always room on top.

    My Collection: JLC Reverso Squadra Hometime, Oris BC4 Retrograde Day, Mr Jones Watch The Last Laugh, Louis Erard 1931 Retrograde

  10. #9
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    Re: Power Reserves on Automatic Watches

    On the low end; Hamiltons H31 - 60 hours should get you through the week end, and Tissot's Powermatic 80 with long weekend length 80 hours.
    thumos and dylanh99 like this.
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  11. #10
    Moderator Public Forum John MS's Avatar
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    Re: Power Reserves on Automatic Watches

    Quote Originally Posted by thumos View Post
    So no one is making a watch with a mainspring that isn't steel? Especially considering the fact that stainless steel tends to deform over time when flexed continuously?
    Anyone know what the alloy of steel is? A quick Google search isn't pulling anything up. They just say "white" alloy.
    Incidentally, they don't cost that much...
    Did you have a solution in mind for an alternative mainspring material that will provide an ultra long power reserve? If so you might want to get it into production. Or become a consultant to Swatch. Check the definitions for spring steel.
    Last edited by John MS; July 31st, 2014 at 22:07.
    Watchbreath likes this.

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