Question on chronograph accuracy vs watch accuracy
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  1. #1
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    Question on chronograph accuracy vs watch accuracy

    Dear all,

    I recently decided to get a Tissot Veloci-T Automatic watch, as it's the most affordable, good looking (to my taste), Swiss, automatic chronograph I could find. And does it look gorgeous in the metal... wow, it looks like it could cost way more.

    To cut a long story short, after receiving a faulty Veloci-T I ended up getting two working ones.

    However, while they both seem to be reasonably accurate as watches, the chronograph part of them is too fast. Compared to internet time and a quartz watch, one of the Veoci-T is too fast by just over a second per hour. The other one is much better, still faster than my references, but drifting ahead by around a second in 5 hours (all this is as seen on the big central seconds hand).

    But the strange thing is that the minute hand and the small seconds hand (pertinent to the watch, not the chronograph section), are nigh on perfect on both watches.

    So to me, being basically a beginner and somewhat ignorant about watches, this looks odd and raises a couple of questions:

    - Is it normally possible for a watch to be very accurate, and yet for the chronograph function on that very same watch to be significantly too fast? (That would imply largely independent mechanisms, does that make sense from a watchmaking point of view?)

    - Could it be that the chronograph movement has been magnetized, while the main watch movement hasn't?

    - Logically, shouldn't the chronograph section be more accurate than the watch section? I mean, the chronograph is supposed to be a chronometer substitute for precise measurements, whereas the watch is for looser, at a glance timechecking.

    I realise that it's a C01.211 movement and it's not going to rival the proper automatic movements that some of you guys have on luxury watches. And the Veloci-T is not a COSC certified chronometer. But still, the fastest of my two Veloci-T has a chronograph that's outside Tissot's normal tolerance for a mechanical watch. This is somewhat odd i think... isn't it?

    And the Tissot website does not mention tolerances for the chronographs, just for mechanical watches in general.

    NB: Both watches were manually wound to get them started, and rested on a flat surface most of the time, on their side, crown up. When I picked them up I held both at the same time for comparison purposes, so they were treated consistently.

  2. #2
    Member little big feather's Avatar
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    Re: Question on chronograph accuracy vs watch accuracy

    Are you running the chrono all the time? It's not for running all the time.
    No... the chrono function is part of the whole watch so it is not magnetized.
    Any watches posted may be seen as gifts,borrowed or found property and not as personal property of Little Big Feather.

  3. #3
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    Re: Question on chronograph accuracy vs watch accuracy

    Well yes, i ran the chronographs over several hours, because the only way to prove a drift is to allow some time. And the chronograph includes a six hour dial, so this suggests that it can be used over that kind of time range, even if it's not usually what happens.

    The result after approximately six hour confirmed what I could detect after about one to two hours.

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  5. #4
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    Re: Question on chronograph accuracy vs watch accuracy

    The chrono module should keep time the same as the rest of the watch, but activating the chrono can change the accuracy by decreasing the beat amplitude of the balance wheel, especially if the power reserve is low and the watch is sensitive to isochronism.

  6. #5
    Member seanwontreturn's Avatar
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    Re: Question on chronograph accuracy vs watch accuracy

    Quote Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post
    The chrono module should keep time the same as the rest of the watch, but activating the chrono can change the accuracy by decreasing the beat amplitude of the balance wheel, especially if the power reserve is low and the watch is sensitive to isochronism.
    Would you please disclosure some source of the said chrono decreasing amplitude of escapement?

  7. #6
    Moderator at Large stuffler,mike's Avatar
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    Re: Question on chronograph accuracy vs watch accuracy

    You only have one movement, there is no chronograpgh and a main movement. And yes, accuracy can be different as well as the power reserve.
    Kind regards
    Mike


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  8. #7
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    Re: Question on chronograph accuracy vs watch accuracy

    Ok, erm... I don't understand "sensitive to isochronism", sorry but I'm not that informed. The power reserve, well... they are new out of the box, but i wound them 32 times each, which according to Tissot should get them going for over 40 hours if memory serves, and swung them about a little bit at the beginning. I did not wear them because I have not adjusted the bracelets.

    But you stated that the chrono module should keep time the same as the rest of the watch, and clearly this isn't happening here.

    I read elsewhere that there is a breaking in period for mechanical watches, I wonder if that's indeed the case here.

  9. #8
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    Re: Question on chronograph accuracy vs watch accuracy

    @ Mike,

    That sounds confident and simple, thanks!

    12656 posts...

    /me raises my virtual hat.

  10. #9
    Member drunken monkey's Avatar
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    Re: Question on chronograph accuracy vs watch accuracy

    In most mechanical chronograph watches, the running of the chronograph has an effect on the running of the time-keeping aspect of the watch; both are powered by the same mainspring after all.
    The accuracy of these chronographs is also dependent on the accuracy of the watch/movement as both are again, regulated by the same balance wheel.
    i.e the chronograph will typically display the same rate of deviance as the rest of the watch.

    You mention that with the chronograph running, you detected a deviance of maybe 1 second every 5 hours. Extrapolating from this gives an approximate deviation of 4-5 seconds every 24 hours.
    That means your watch is running at about 4-5 seconds every day which isn't too shabby and pretty much typical for a "basic" Swiss movement watch.


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  11. #10
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    Re: Question on chronograph accuracy vs watch accuracy

    Quote Originally Posted by drunken monkey View Post
    In most mechanical chronograph watches, the running of the chronograph has an effect on the running of the time-keeping aspect of the watch; both are powered by the same mainspring after all.
    The accuracy of these chronographs is also dependent on the accuracy of the watch/movement as both are again, regulated by the same balance wheel.
    i.e the chronograph will typically display the same rate of deviance as the rest of the watch.

    You mention that with the chronograph running, you detected a deviance of maybe 1 second every 5 hours. Extrapolating from this gives an approximate deviation of 4-5 seconds every 24 hours.
    That means your watch is running at about 4-5 seconds every day which isn't too shabby and pretty much typical for a "basic" Swiss movement watch.
    Thanks (and thanks to all of you for the replies).

    Well, the best of the two is indeed not bad at all, but the fastest one seems really too fast...

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