Reliability of Rolex vs ETA vs other movements

Thread: Reliability of Rolex vs ETA vs other movements

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  1. #1
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    Reliability of Rolex vs ETA vs other movements

    Rolex watches are known to be very reliable. If this is true, what makes Rolex movements more reliable and dependable than other movements such as ETA 2824/2892? I have read about how Rolexes and some Seiko movements can sometimes go without service for 15-20 years. However, it seems that this is not the case with ETA movements (at least from multiple forum threads on the subject).

    Reading articles on both ETA movements and Rolex caliber 3135, the Rolex movements do not use ball bearings for its rotor which is considered a weakness to its longevity -- one of the first things to go so to speak. What is the weakness or weaknesses of the ETA 2824/2892 that cause them to break down prior to the Rolex calibre if neither are serviced?

  2. #2
    Member Tickstart's Avatar
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    Re: Reliability of Rolex vs ETA vs other movements

    It doesn't use ball bearings? :s That can't be right.. Rolex must have a different design altogether, you have misunderstood something. *googles*

    Oh, well.. Don't know what to say now. That's pathetic.

  3. #3
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    Re: Reliability of Rolex vs ETA vs other movements

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnyKwst View Post
    Rolex watches are known to be very reliable. If this is true, what makes Rolex movements more reliable and dependable than other movements such as ETA 2824/2892? I have read about how Rolexes and some Seiko movements can sometimes go without service for 15-20 years. However, it seems that this is not the case with ETA movements (at least from multiple forum threads on the subject).

    Reading articles on both ETA movements and Rolex caliber 3135, the Rolex movements do not use ball bearings for its rotor which is considered a weakness to its longevity -- one of the first things to go so to speak. What is the weakness or weaknesses of the ETA 2824/2892 that cause them to break down prior to the Rolex calibre if neither are serviced?
    ETA movements are very reliable -- they have stood the test of time.

    Firstly, Rolex moevements are outlandishly overpriced which in no way is a reflection of their quality.

    Secondly, Rolex moevements are very good movements indeed.

    Thirdly, for the price of one Rolex watch (I think you cannot buy individual Rolex movements) you can buy one ETA powered watch and add to that the service costs and you will still have saved a whopping amount of money.

    It is up to you.

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  5. #4
    Member rdoder's Avatar
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    Re: Reliability of Rolex vs ETA vs other movements

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7Jr5X62EKNo

    In that video, starting at time stamp 8:10, that watchmaker explains why Rolex is so reliable and durable. To paraphrase him, Rolex movements are reliable and durable because they are extremely well-made, with good quality materials, perfectly engineered and manufactured to correct specifications and sizes, that everything fall into place (the parts fit together really well), there's no need to wrestle things into place. Rolex does not cut corners in their manufacturing process, they do everything to the very best they can.

    My understanding is, they also make improvements to materials used and movement design over time. E.g. parachrom hairspring that is anti-magnetic and offer great stability over temperature variation, free-sprung balance that offer better stability of rate once timed (no regulator to knock about) and offer less positional variation in timing, Breguet overcoil to address isochronism, and new design for shock absorber over time. R&D and continuous improvement make them great.

    References:

    http://static.rolex.com/flipboard/th...airspring.html
    http://www.watchprosite.com/page-wf....01/pi-3662881/
    http://www.fourtane.com/fourtane-blo...x-breguet-meet

    Also, I see that they regulate the timing before casing the movement, and after casing, they let the watch run on winder for several days before regulating (and adjusting?) again to ensure accuracy.

    EDIT: that said, I agree that it is a lot to pay for reliability and durability, when quartz is more reliable and durable for far cheaper, and without servicing, any mechanical movement will be less accurate over time and break eventually, requiring repair or preventative periodic servicing. It becomes a matter of appreciating what Rolex does in mechanical movement to achieve greatness compared to other mechanical movements.
    Last edited by rdoder; October 22nd, 2016 at 15:10.

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