Thoughts on winding an automatic screw-down-crown (diver) by crown every morning?
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  1. #1
    Member Bomfunk's Avatar
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    Thoughts on winding an automatic screw-down-crown (diver) by crown every morning?

    What's your take on this? What happens to the crown/seals/mechanism? Is this dangerous to the watch?

  2. #2
    Member geoffbot's Avatar
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    Re: Thoughts on winding an automatic screw-down-crown (diver) by crown every morning?

    That it's screw-down is irrelevant re wear and tear on the keyless works in the movement from unnecessary winding (which, on the 2824 at least, it has been well-documented is an issue). But you have a higher chance of stripping the thread if you un/screw it every day.

    Why bother? Just put it on and wear it. And every morning? It should still be running from the night before - most autos have a 40hr power reserve.
    CitizenM likes this.

  3. #3
    Member CitizenM's Avatar
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    Re: Thoughts on winding an automatic screw-down-crown (diver) by crown every morning?

    Yes, on most automatic watches, it is officially recommended that you don't handwind them frequently because their manual winding components are not as robust as on a manual wind watch (for various reasons). The only watch company that comes to mind that expressly says you can handwind their automatics as much as you want is Nomos.

    You also have an increased chance of stripping a screw down crown the more you use it. That danger is somewhat doubled since you have a vastly increased chance of forgetting to screw it down one day and getting into the pool or something by accident. It's true that virtually all modern screw down crown watch cases are still sealed when unscrewed, but it's still possible for water to get in if there's any real pressure.

    So I'd say just leave it screwed down when you can. Give it a few shakes and it'll start running and you can just wear it the rest of the day.

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  5. #4
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    Re: Thoughts on winding an automatic screw-down-crown (diver) by crown every morning?

    Everytime I see this come up (and it is askd so often that I am beginning to think ther must be an evil conspiracy afoot) MY question - beyond the obvious "why?" is what else do you do to circumvent a device that is made to prevent you from having to do something?
    to wit:
    1) Do you keep the TV remote on top the TV and walk across the room to change Channels?
    2) Do yo continue to drive using hand signals for braking - despite the fact that the brake lights come on anyway?
    3) Do you push the "open" button on elevators upon arriving on your floor(it'll open by itself y'know) and the "close" button upon leaving the elevator?
    4) Adjust the volume on your car audio despite the fact that the Auto Level Control is turned on?
    5) Obsessivly adjust you HVAC control even though the thermostat is properly set to a temperature you like?
    and the other million or so similar things we encounter in daily living.

    I'm not being trying to be rude, I just don't believe that there are that many people that don't understand that the concept of an automatic watch is that it winds itself "automatically". I mean we are in an age where nearly everyone graduated to an auto from a quartz- hence they are not habitual watch winders like our grandfathers were (or me for that matter). I remember when I got my first auto back in 1971 I thought "Great, I don't have to wind it everyday!" (OK, I really thought "Wow, like groovy man!" but I translated it for those who don't speak '70's).
    And yes, mechanical movement is always associated with wear - great or small, sooner or later it will fail.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  6. #5
    Member BGPT23's Avatar
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    Re: Thoughts on winding an automatic screw-down-crown (diver) by crown every morning?

    I currently wear an Omega Seamaster 2254.50 just about every day, and have never hand-wound it. Since acquiring it a few months ago, it's never been off my wrist long enough to stop running, so there's been no need. I understand that some folks enjoy hand-winding a watch, and I can definitely appreciate that, however, as others have said, it is not necessarily the best thing you can do, both for the movement, which isn't really designed to be frequently hand-wound (despite having the feature) and the screw-down crown. If you enjoy hand-winding a watch, maybe find yourself a manual wind mechanical with a standard, non-screwed crown.

  7. #6
    Member robertl's Avatar
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    Re: Thoughts on winding an automatic screw-down-crown (diver) by crown every morning?

    I don't have experience with a screw in crown, but I do wind my automatic Carrera once or twice a week lately since I haven't been wearing it more than once or twice a week. I know I don't need to and that it won't hurt it to have the movement stop here and there, but I'm a little OCD about it and don't want to put it on a winder.
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  8. #7
    Member ken_sturrock's Avatar
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    Re: Thoughts on winding an automatic screw-down-crown (diver) by crown every morning?

    Just don't... Either let it do its weight swinging thing or upgrade to a hand-wind.

  9. #8
    Member Bomfunk's Avatar
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    Re: Thoughts on winding an automatic screw-down-crown (diver) by crown every morning?

    I'm asking this ridiculous question because there is something wrong with my automatic. It had stopped last dawn and I tried to get it going by spinning it around gently. The rotor spun around but the watch didn't start. I tried this in different positions but it didn't start ticking. Then, finally, it did start to work.

    I let a watchmaker inspect my watch a week ago because it had stopped overnight and swaying it didn't get it going. The watchmaker took the watch and it started ticking when he gave it a shake. No screws were loose etc. All fine.

    He measured the amplitude and it was 280 dial up, 230 in other positions. This meant it needed a service but he said it's OK to use it for a while if I didnt't want to get it serviced yet (I have a reason for this. I'd like to get it serviced in December/January and it was all OK).

    Now I wonder why the rotor doesn't wind the watch properly? Sometimes it winds and sometimes it doesn't. The rotor spins freely all the time, it's not stuck. What's up with it? This is the problem here.


    Quote Originally Posted by Donf View Post
    Everytime I see this come up (and it is askd so often that I am beginning to think ther must be an evil conspiracy afoot) MY question - beyond the obvious "why?" is what else do you do to circumvent a device that is made to prevent you from having to do something?
    to wit:
    1) Do you keep the TV remote on top the TV and walk across the room to change Channels?
    2) Do yo continue to drive using hand signals for braking - despite the fact that the brake lights come on anyway?
    3) Do you push the "open" button on elevators upon arriving on your floor(it'll open by itself y'know) and the "close" button upon leaving the elevator?
    4) Adjust the volume on your car audio despite the fact that the Auto Level Control is turned on?
    5) Obsessivly adjust you HVAC control even though the thermostat is properly set to a temperature you like?
    and the other million or so similar things we encounter in daily living.

    I'm not being trying to be rude, I just don't believe that there are that many people that don't understand that the concept of an automatic watch is that it winds itself "automatically". I mean we are in an age where nearly everyone graduated to an auto from a quartz- hence they are not habitual watch winders like our grandfathers were (or me for that matter). I remember when I got my first auto back in 1971 I thought "Great, I don't have to wind it everyday!" (OK, I really thought "Wow, like groovy man!" but I translated it for those who don't speak '70's).
    And yes, mechanical movement is always associated with wear - great or small, sooner or later it will fail.

  10. #9
    Member geoffbot's Avatar
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    Re: Thoughts on winding an automatic screw-down-crown (diver) by crown every morning?

    Only your watchmaker can tell you that I think.

  11. #10
    Member little big feather's Avatar
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    Re: Thoughts on winding an automatic screw-down-crown (diver) by crown every morning?

    Important question...Make and Model of your watch?

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