The tool watch is dead. Long live the tool watch. - Page 3
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  1. #21
    Member TheWalrus's Avatar
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    Re: The tool watch is dead. Long live the tool watch.

    Quote Originally Posted by Monocrom View Post
    I use a P-51 as my main can-opener.
    Somehow, this seems like overkill...

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  2. #22
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    Re: The tool watch is dead. Long live the tool watch.

    Quote Originally Posted by WnS View Post
    Not only do I like the price tag from 1964, I also like the price ratio. Assuming an affordable "underwater watch" (say a mechanical one) is $200 today, that would price the Rolex at $1000. Would totally buy a Rolex if that was the case.

    Good point

  3. #23
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    The tool watch is dead. Long live the tool watch.

    There was only one Cousteau. What he would wear today isn't that important. The question to me is what would the Cousteau wannabe who wore a Submariner in 1960 wear today? The Sub was a nice, Swiss, utilitarian watch from a respected, but not high-end brand, worn by people who played at being rugged outdoorsmen.

    The closest I can come up with is a Tissot T-touch. Unlike a G-shock, it can be worn with business casual and in social settings beyond the football-game beer party. It will look right on a hunting trip, or a Sunday afternoon sail--just the sorts of activities by the ca. 1960 "sportsman". It's expensive enough to be out of reach of the impecunious, but affordable by the middle class non-WIS rugged-outdoorsman-wannabe population. It's similar to the Rolex of the day. It has enough tool features to give geeks something to show off to their buddies, while avoiding the appearance of cheapness.

    It continues the tradition of a decent-looking non-luxury Swiss sport watch that could live on the dresser with a nice gold dress watch.

    But all tools of sport have gotten more toolish. Nobody hunting or sport-sailing today would wear the plain-old-clothes that people did 50 years ago. Everything has gotten more specialized--to a fault. I still have to laugh when I see middle-aged fat guys (like me) dressed as if going to war, wearing watches with features they have to read a book to understand.

    Rick "not trying to recall a time that never was" Denney
    Last edited by Rdenney; October 25th, 2013 at 20:34.
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  5. #24
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    Re: The tool watch is dead. Long live the tool watch.

    Quote Originally Posted by GlennO View Post
    Yes I agree. The G-Shock and its kind are without doubt the modern tool watch.
    Too bad they're so ugly and uncomfortable!

    I had a G-Shock, sold it because I hated wearing it, and I've tried a few others and just couldn't make it work. My Suunto, however, feels great on the wrist, with the only weird about it for me is how light it is. May not be as tough as a G-Shock per se, but, I'll take Suunto over G-Shock every time. Just my personal preference.

    But neither of them are regular watches. They look funny with clothing that isn't ultra casual; something a Rolex or Omega never really had an issue with. Something like the Marathon TSAR/GSAR or the huge amount of $600 microdivers out there would be more the spiritual successor in my mind.
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  6. #25
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    Re: The tool watch is dead. Long live the tool watch.

    My thought exactly, just didn't get it...

    Quote Originally Posted by TheWalrus View Post
    Somehow, this seems like overkill...

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  7. #26
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    Re: The tool watch is dead. Long live the tool watch.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fantasio View Post
    My thought exactly, just didn't get it...
    I think he got the numbers mixed up 51 -> 38. The P-38 is (in a military context), folding pocket can opener, US WWII interceptor made by Lockheed, and German pistol made by Walter.
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  8. #27
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    Re: The tool watch is dead. Long live the tool watch.

    Well...there's still the Seiko divers. Also, the Omega SpeedyPro 3570.50 has refrained from getting gussied up.
    rfortson and Jack1775 like this.

  9. #28
    Moderator Public Forum GlennO's Avatar
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    Re: The tool watch is dead. Long live the tool watch.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raza View Post
    Something like the Marathon TSAR/GSAR or the huge amount of $600 microdivers out there would be more the spiritual successor in my mind.
    Yes I agree. But notice we are using the word 'spiritual' alot. The Marathons, Sinns, Damaskos et al are slightly tricked up watches designed to appeal to us WIS, a tiny percentage of watch wearers. The vast majority will choose the Suunto/G-Shock for sports/specialised activities and the ugly damn things end up being worn everywhere since for many it's their only watch.

  10. #29
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    Re: The tool watch is dead. Long live the tool watch.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post
    It's not a particularly controversial notion that the iconic "tool watches" that have grown to be so famous have diverged pretty far from their original intended purpose. Like it or not, watches like the Rolex Submariner or Omega Seamaster are now being marketed as exclusive luxury items, made of precious stainless steel metal and boasting features borrowed from much higher end watches. These watches are noticeably different than their previous versions in terms of quality and intended purpose, and prices hikes have far outpaced the rate of inflation as a result.

    So I thought it might be interesting to ask, what do you guys think are the spiritual successors to the original incarnations of these watches? Perhaps a utilitarian but well-made Marathon GSAR or Sinn? Or is it conceivable that if these companies had access to modern technology back then they would have made something closer to a G-shock or Luminox? Maybe something else entirely?

    Note: this isn't intended to be an argument about what the one and only successor might be, just a discussion of various possibilities. Any historical insight to back up your choice would be interesting, too.
    I think this is a great point and a good observation. It's something that has had be confused for some time now.

    I wonder how you define luxury though... Is it cost? The submariner for example is simply 316L steel isn't it? I have much cheaper watches and even a razor for shaving made out of the stuff.

    To your point though, I'd say you're spot on with Marathon, Sinn and the like. I'd probably include Damasko as well, and perhaps even a few of the watches from Breitling...


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  11. #30
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    Re: The tool watch is dead. Long live the tool watch.

    Quote Originally Posted by enkidu View Post
    I think he got the numbers mixed up 51 -> 38. The P-38 is (in a military context), folding pocket can opener, US WWII interceptor made by Lockheed, and German pistol made by Walter.
    P51 is the bigger brother of P38:
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