Touchy Subject: Chinese-American on Chinese Knock-Offs
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  1. #1
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    Touchy Subject: Chinese-American on Chinese Knock-Offs

    Being sensitive that this is a touchy subject, I do want to voice a very personal thought that I have, and that is, as a Chinese-American, I find that I am uncomfortable when people talk about "knockoffs" from China. I'm not saying that we shouldn't call cheap knockoffs cheap knockoffs nor should we condone such illegal and immoral activity. I buy authentic watches and make it a point to buy only authentic.

    Maybe it's just me, and maybe I'm taking this too personally, but I feel like it's gotten to my psyche somewhat and I feel like the zeitgeist of cheap counterfeits, or, for that matter, cheap anything from authentic electronics to toys from China has made me look like a cheap knockoff in the eyes of people in my industry when it comes to work, or being a "knockoff" friend to my friends, or being a "knockoff" boyfriend to my girlfriend.

    Case in point, you hear the same "cheap from China" and "knockoff from China" language in movies to TV to radio to newspapers and etc., etc., at the expense of those of us of Chinese heritage who are trying to add value and contribute to society in an honest and significant way.

    I would like to hear from those of us who are Chinese, or Chinese-American, or Chinese-anything, how you deal and cope. Those of us who are non-Chinese, I'd love to hear your opinions or any thoughts you might care to share as well.

    Obviously, this zeitgeist will not change for a very long time, for, though China may be a fast-growing economy with a GDP that is set to overtake the US's soon, it's per capita income, while rising quickly, will remain low for a very long time, keeping the country the world's low-cost manufacturer for a very long time.

    And its counterfeit problem, while I wish it could be eradicated as I can appreciate the importance of designing and marketing the iconic sub or tank or calatrava, I feel that China's government has bigger fish to fry, namely, economic growth and reform, energy, pollution and a whole host of other priorities before it can get to the counterfeit problem. Thus, the problem, unfortunately, is here to stay for a very long time, as well.

    So, my aim here is not to change the labeling, but merely to talk about how maybe I could change my self-perception.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by SuperBatIronman; October 26th, 2014 at 06:38.
    A happy owner of five haute horlogerie timepieces:
    - Patek Philippe Calatrava ref 3919J cal 215PS
    - Vacheron Constantin Patrimony ref 31160/000J cal 1132.2 (based on Frederic Piguet 810 ebauche)
    - Audemars Piguet Royal Oak ref 56303SA (no-date version of 56175SA) cal 2612
    - Piaget ref 90802 cal 9P
    - Ulysse Nardin ref 4120-1 cal N10AA

    Why I love:
    - PP: Founded 1839, oldest family-owned watchmaker, most expensive watch ever sold at auction, at $24MM, is a PP
    - VC: Founded 1755, oldest watchmaker continually in existence, created most complicated mechanical watch ever made, with 57 horological complications
    - AP: Founded 1875, oldest watchmaker still owned by founding family, created world's first luxury sportwatch, the Royal Oak
    - Piaget: Founded 1874, created thinnest movement in 1957, the 9P, at 2mm thick
    - UN: Founded 1846, official marine chronometer supplier to US, UK, Japanese and Russian Navies

    Watch my review of my Holy Trinity here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRhnqIRg62E

  2. #2
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    Re: Touchy Subject: Chinese-American on Chinese Knock-Offs

    You should spend some time in the Chinese mechanical watches sub-forum. Lots of fans of Chinese watches there. In fact, one of my favorites is my Seagull 1963 Reissue.





    I have seen some really nice watches from China using original brands.

  3. #3
    Member Inca Bloc's Avatar
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    Re: Touchy Subject: Chinese-American on Chinese Knock-Offs

    I.M.O it's all in the mind....
    "Unum Non Satis"


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  5. #4
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    Re: Touchy Subject: Chinese-American on Chinese Knock-Offs

    FWIW, the best phone and tablet on the planet are made in China.....the iPhone.
    SuperBatIronman and powerband like this.
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  6. #5
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    Re: Touchy Subject: Chinese-American on Chinese Knock-Offs

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperBatIronman View Post
    Being sensitive that this is a touchy subject, I do want to voice a very personal thought that I have, and that is, as a Chinese-American, I find that I am uncomfortable when people talk about "knockoffs" from China. I'm not saying that we shouldn't call cheap knockoffs cheap knockoffs nor should we condone such illegal and immoral activity. I buy authentic watches and make it a point to buy only authentic.

    Maybe it's just me, and maybe I'm taking this too personally, but I feel like it's gotten to my psyche somewhat and I feel like the zeitgeist of cheap counterfeits, or, for that matter, cheap anything from authentic electronics to toys from China has made me look like a cheap knockoff in the eyes of people in my industry when it comes to work, or being a "knockoff" friend to my friends, or being a "knockoff" boyfriend to my girlfriend.

    Case in point, you hear the same "cheap from China" and "knockoff from China" language in movies to TV to radio to newspapers and etc., etc., at the expense of those of us of Chinese heritage who are trying to add value and contribute to society in an honest and significant way.

    I would like to hear from those of us who are Chinese, or Chinese-American, or Chinese-anything, how you deal and cope. Those of us who are non-Chinese, I'd love to hear your opinions or any thoughts you might care to share as well.

    Obviously, this zeitgeist will not change for a very long time, for, though China may be a fast-growing economy with a GDP that is set to overtake the US's soon, it's per capita income, while rising quickly, will remain low for a very long time, keeping the country the world's low-cost manufacturer for a very long time.

    And its counterfeit problem, while I wish it could be eradicated as I can appreciate the "groundbreakingness" of designing and marketing the iconic sub or tank or calatrava, I feel that its government has bigger fish to fry, namely, economic growth and reform, energy, pollution and a whole host of other priorities before it can get to the counterfeit problem. Thus, the problem, unfortunately, is here to stay for a very long time, as well.

    So, my aim here is not to change the labeling, but merely to talk about how maybe I could change my self-perception.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    First thing I would say, amico, is to wake up. You are NOT a "Chinese-American" anymore than I am an "Italian-American". I object strenuously to anyone calling me an "Italian-American" even though both my mother and sister still hold both Italian and American citizenship. I do not. If anyone asks, I call myself a AID-"American of Italian Descent" and it would be much better if you started thinking of yourself as a "American of Chinese Descent"--ACD-- than a hyphenated nationality, which you are not. So when you hear people talk about all the Chinese made junk that is on the market, naturally there is a sense of shame that the country your ancestors came from is dumping so much sheer drek on the market. But the fact is, you are an American, not a Chinese. All the time, if you turn on the TV, my ancestors are portrayed as a country of thugs. My family is from Sicily. Everytime the word "Sicily" comes up "Mafia" comes up. It's an automatic association everybody makes. It's no fun at all.

    But I'm an American, not a Sicilian, nor am I am Italian. While I am intensely proud of my Italian heritage, I am first, foremost and last an American. So I would advise you--grow a thick skin about this subject like I've had to do about the Mafia. Take pride in your Chinese heritage, but always remember that this is how you became and American, which is what you are. If people talk about Chinese junk, learn to shrug it off. If it's any consolation, Japanese products for a long time went through the same things and Korean products also got really slammed for the same reason. Both China and Korea have radically improved the quality of what they make, and are now by words for good quality. Maybe the same will happen with China.

    But more than anything else, grow a thick skin and learn not to cringe. You're an American, and it just happens that your ancestors came from China.You're hard wired in an entirely American manner, and nothing the Chinese do can be laid at your door and none of it rubs off on you.

  7. #6
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    Re: Touchy Subject: Chinese-American on Chinese Knock-Offs

    Its cool to be chinese. Bruce lee said so - ronnie chieng.
    SuperBatIronman likes this.


  8. #7
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    Re: Touchy Subject: Chinese-American on Chinese Knock-Offs

    I won't buy any pet food from there.
    Quote Originally Posted by yankeexpress View Post
    FWIW, the best phone and tablet on the planet are made in China.....the iPhone.

  9. #8
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    Re: Touchy Subject: Chinese-American on Chinese Knock-Offs

    I'm half Chinese. The few anti Chinese sentiments here made me cringe a bit, but I just shrugged it off. There are more important things to worry about.
    SuperBatIronman likes this.

  10. #9
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    Re: Touchy Subject: Chinese-American on Chinese Knock-Offs

    Quote Originally Posted by Somewhere else View Post
    First thing I would say, amico, is to wake up. You are NOT a "Chinese-American" anymore than I am an "Italian-American". I object strenuously to anyone calling me an "Italian-American" even though both my mother and sister still hold both Italian and American citizenship. I do not. If anyone asks, I call myself a AID-"American of Italian Descent" and it would be much better if you started thinking of yourself as a "American of Chinese Descent"--ACD-- than a hyphenated nationality, which you are not. So when you hear people talk about all the Chinese made junk that is on the market, naturally there is a sense of shame that the country your ancestors came from is dumping so much sheer drek on the market. But the fact is, you are an American, not a Chinese. All the time, if you turn on the TV, my ancestors are portrayed as a country of thugs. My family is from Sicily. Everytime the word "Sicily" comes up "Mafia" comes up. It's an automatic association everybody makes. It's no fun at all.

    But I'm an American, not a Sicilian, nor am I am Italian. While I am intensely proud of my Italian heritage, I am first, foremost and last an American. So I would advise you--grow a thick skin about this subject like I've had to do about the Mafia. Take pride in your Chinese heritage, but always remember that this is how you became and American, which is what you are. If people talk about Chinese junk, learn to shrug it off. If it's any consolation, Japanese products for a long time went through the same things and Korean products also got really slammed for the same reason. Both China and Korea have radically improved the quality of what they make, and are now by words for good quality. Maybe the same will happen with China.

    But more than anything else, grow a thick skin and learn not to cringe. You're an American, and it just happens that your ancestors came from China.You're hard wired in an entirely American manner, and nothing the Chinese do can be laid at your door and none of it rubs off on you.
    Thank you, my compadre, this is exactly the kind of kick in the pants I needed! :)


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    A happy owner of five haute horlogerie timepieces:
    - Patek Philippe Calatrava ref 3919J cal 215PS
    - Vacheron Constantin Patrimony ref 31160/000J cal 1132.2 (based on Frederic Piguet 810 ebauche)
    - Audemars Piguet Royal Oak ref 56303SA (no-date version of 56175SA) cal 2612
    - Piaget ref 90802 cal 9P
    - Ulysse Nardin ref 4120-1 cal N10AA

    Why I love:
    - PP: Founded 1839, oldest family-owned watchmaker, most expensive watch ever sold at auction, at $24MM, is a PP
    - VC: Founded 1755, oldest watchmaker continually in existence, created most complicated mechanical watch ever made, with 57 horological complications
    - AP: Founded 1875, oldest watchmaker still owned by founding family, created world's first luxury sportwatch, the Royal Oak
    - Piaget: Founded 1874, created thinnest movement in 1957, the 9P, at 2mm thick
    - UN: Founded 1846, official marine chronometer supplier to US, UK, Japanese and Russian Navies

    Watch my review of my Holy Trinity here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRhnqIRg62E

  11. #10
    Member Art Collector's Avatar
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    Re: Touchy Subject: Chinese-American on Chinese Knock-Offs

    Quote Originally Posted by mikeylacroix View Post
    Its cool to be chinese. Bruce lee said so - ronnie chieng.
    Haha :)


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    A happy owner of five haute horlogerie timepieces:
    - Patek Philippe Calatrava ref 3919J cal 215PS
    - Vacheron Constantin Patrimony ref 31160/000J cal 1132.2 (based on Frederic Piguet 810 ebauche)
    - Audemars Piguet Royal Oak ref 56303SA (no-date version of 56175SA) cal 2612
    - Piaget ref 90802 cal 9P
    - Ulysse Nardin ref 4120-1 cal N10AA

    Why I love:
    - PP: Founded 1839, oldest family-owned watchmaker, most expensive watch ever sold at auction, at $24MM, is a PP
    - VC: Founded 1755, oldest watchmaker continually in existence, created most complicated mechanical watch ever made, with 57 horological complications
    - AP: Founded 1875, oldest watchmaker still owned by founding family, created world's first luxury sportwatch, the Royal Oak
    - Piaget: Founded 1874, created thinnest movement in 1957, the 9P, at 2mm thick
    - UN: Founded 1846, official marine chronometer supplier to US, UK, Japanese and Russian Navies

    Watch my review of my Holy Trinity here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRhnqIRg62E

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