Water resistance...... false advertising????

Thread: Water resistance...... false advertising????

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  1. #1
    Member Avengeance's Avatar
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    Question Water resistance...... false advertising????

    Who skin dives to 660ft?

    How do you swim to 165ft?

    Is it even possible to snorkel to 500ft?

    http://www.zales.com/jewelry101/inde...aterResistance

    I never understood how you can rate a watch 100ft water resistant but its only safe to be "briefly splashed" with water and "not suitable for swimming".

    I dont get it.

    Anyone care to explain further?
    - Nick

    Cars or Watches... that is the question!

  2. #2
    Pil-Mil, Breitling Forum Moderator O2AFAC67's Avatar
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    Here. Read this...

    Quote Originally Posted by Avengeance View Post
    Who skin dives to 660ft? How do you swim to 165ft? Is it even possible to snorkel to 500ft? http://www.zales.com/jewelry101/inde...aterResistance I never understood how you can rate a watch 100ft water resistant but its only safe to be "briefly splashed" with water and "not suitable for swimming". I dont get it. Anyone care to explain further?
    Water Resistant Mark
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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    The Water Resistant mark is a common mark stamped on the back of wrist watches. It is usually accompanied by a rating in terms of meters or feet of pressure which the device is supposedly able to resist.

    The "Water Resistant" mark has come to replace the "Water Proof" and is now described by two ISO Standards: ISO 2281 and ISO 6425

    Watches are usually marked with one of the following ratings:

    30 Meters/100 Feet
    50 Meters/160 Feet
    100 Meters/300 Feet
    150 Meters/500 Feet
    200 Meters/660 Feet
    1000 Meters/3300 Feet
    These however, do not generally indicate the point at which a watch's resistance to pressure is expected to fail. For example, a watch rated 30 Meters would not be expected to survive Scuba Diving to 30 Meters, but would be expected to survive light splashing, for example wearing in the shower.

    The reason is that the rating describes the static water pressure that the watch will survive. However, any motion of the watch underwater will increase the water pressure on it. Consequently, water at pressure coming from a tap directed onto a watch that is water resistant to 30 metres may leak into it, as will diving or swimming vigorously at any depth.[1]

    A watch rated 50 Meters is expected to survive immersion without pressure such as being worn while washing up dishes.
    A watch marked with 100 Meters should be able to survive surface swimming.
    A watch marked with 200 Meters should be able to survive Scuba Diving to a depth of 30 meters.
    A watch marked with 1000 Meters should be able to withstand pressure greater than 500 Meters which is at the edge of the limit of human endurance(why buy one?).
    Because of the historical disparity between what watch makers claim, and what watches are actually expected to be able to survive, the ISO Standard specifies a complex testing procedure for each mark. For example to receive the "Water Resistant 30M" mark, the watch must be able to survive 30 minutes under water at a depth of 1 m (3 feet) followed by 90 seconds under a pressure corresponding to 20m (66 feet).


    References
    1. FAQ pages at Seiko Watches website



    Cheers,
    Ron


    " The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With The Sea "


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  3. #3
    stuffler,mike
    Guest

    Re: Water resistance...... false advertising????

    Shameless plug:

    WATER-RESISTANCE

    Thanks to the sports watch boom, water resistance has become so common in watches that we often take it for granted. But a closer look at this popular feature reveals some uncommon ingenuity.

    What makes a watch water-resistant?

    Why aren't watches ever labeled or described in advertising as "waterproof" even if they can be worn deep-sea diving?

    My watch is labeled "water-resistant to 50 meters" but the manufacturer's instructions say I can only wear it swimming, not snorkeling or diving. Why is that?

    What are the various levels of water-resistance?

    I've seen the abbreviation ATM used in labeling degrees of water resistance. What does it mean?

    Is water resistance permanent?

    How often does water resistance need to be checked?

    How is water resistance tested?

    Can I wear my water resistant watch in the hot tub?

    What besides extreme temperatures will jeopardize my watch's water-resistance?

    My divers' watch came with a leather strap. Will the water harm it?

    1. What makes a watch water-resistant?

    There are several features that help make a watch water-resistant. The most important is the gaskets, or 0 rings-made of rubber, nylon or Teflon which form watertight seals at the joints where the crystal, case back and crown meet the watch case. if the watch is a chronograph, the chronograph pushers will also have gaskets.

    In addition, water-resistant watch cases are lined with a sealant, applied in the form of a quick-hardening liquid, which helps keep water out.

    The thickness and material of the case is also a big factor in determining whether a watch can safely be worn underwater. The case must be sturdy enough to withstand pressure without caving in says John Sokol, technical directors at TAG-Heuer USA in general, this means a steel or titanium case or a steel case plated with gold, manufacturers say. Solid gold cases can be water resistant provided they are sufficiently thick.

    A screw-in case back, as opposed to one that pushes in, also contributes to a watch's water resistance. A screw-in crown, a feature of many divers' watches, helps prevent water getting into the case through the watch-stem hole. When it is screwed down it forms a water tight seal much like the seal between a jar and its lid.

    2. Why aren't watches ever labeled or described in advertising as "waterproof" even if they can be worn deep-sea diving?

    According to guidelines issued by the Federal Trade Commission, watch marketers are not allowed to label their watches "water-proof." Even watches designed for deep-sea diving cannot claim to be water-proof.

    3. My watch is labeled "water-resistant to 50 meters" but the manufacturer's instructions say I can only wear it swimming, not snorkeling or diving. Why is that?

    The different levels of water resistance as expressed in meters are only theoretical. They refer to the depth at which a watch will keep out water if both watch and the water are perfectly motionless, says Scott Chou, technical director at Seiko Corp. of America. These conditions, of course, are never met in the real swimmer's or diver's world. in real life, the movement of the wearer's arm through the water increases the pressure on the watch dramatically; so it can't be worn to the depths indicated by lab testing machines.

    4. What are the various levels of water-resistance?

    Watches with the lowest level of water resistance are labeled simply "water-resistant." They can withstand splashes of water but should not be submerged. Above that (or below it, literally speaking), the most common designations are

    -50 meters (1 meter is about 3.3 feet), which means the watch is suitable for swimming;

    -100 meters; indicating it can be worn snorkeling;

    -200 meters, suitable for recreational scuba diving and, believe it or not,

    -1,000 meters (roughly three-fifths of a mile).

    Watches in this last category can endure deep-sea diving. Their gaskets are made of materials that can withstand the helium used in decompression chambers. Some have valves that let the wearer release the helium that has seeped into the watch so the case won't explode as the watch and diver adjust to normal atmospheric conditions, says Peter Purtschert, technical director at Breitling USA.

    Keep in mind that the depth specified on the watch dial represents the results of tests done in the lab, not in the ocean (see question 3).

    5. I've seen the abbreviation ATM used in labeling degrees of water resistance. What does it mean?

    It stands for "atmosphere" and it's equal to 10 meters of water pressure. Another word for "atmosphere" is "bar," which is often used in Europe.

    6. Is water resistance permanent?

    No. Water resistance depends on several factors (see question 1), some of which can be affected by wear or simply by time. Gaskets can become corroded or misshapen, cases denied or crystals loose or broken. That's why your watch, like your car and your teeth, needs preventive maintenance.

    7. How often does water resistance need to be checked?

    At least once a year. Most manufacturers say water resistance needs to be tested every time the case back is opened, because opening the case can dislodge the gaskets. This rule applies even to a simple battery change. (Many service centers also change the gaskets whenever a watch comes in for service.) You should take it only to a service center authorized by the manufacturer. Doing otherwise could invalidate your warranty.

    8. How is water resistance tested?

    There are basically two ways of machine-testing water resistance, referred to as "dry" and "wet" testing. In the former, the watch is subjected to air pressure and measurements taken to see whether the case expands as a result of air leaking into the case. If it does, the watch is not water resistant.

    In one type of "wet" testing, the watch is first subjected to air pressure, then submerged in water. If air bubbles come out of the watch when it is underwater, it means air seeped into the watch before it was submerged, and it is therefore not water-resistant. In another type, the watch is placed in a small water-filled chamber which is then subjected to pressure from a piston. If water gets into the watch, it's not water resistant (this is obviously the riskiest form of water-resistance testing).

    9. Can I wear my water resistant watch in the hot tub?

    No. Exposing your watch to heat, whether it's in a hot tub or sauna can cause the gaskets to lose their shape and their ability to keep out water.

    10. What besides extreme temperatures will jeopardize my watch's water-resistance?

    Some chemicals can corrode the gaskets and make it vulnerable. Heavily chlorinated water can cause problems, as can spray-on perfumes and hairsprays that work their way into the watch's seams and damage the gaskets. (They can also damage your watch's finish.)

    11. My divers' watch came with a leather strap. Will the water harm it?

    It may. Wearing a leather strap in the pool or diving is not generally recommended, says TAG Heuer's John Sokol. "It's like wearing your shoes to go swimming." Instead, choose a metal, plastic or nylon strap, he advises.

    However, some manufacturers do offer leather bands which have been specially treated to resist water and are guaranteed safe for swimming. Check your warranty before you wear your leather strap in the water.

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  5. #4
    Member Matteeboy's Avatar
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    Re: Water resistance...... false advertising????

    Regarding the leather band, my G Shock GT-006 (200M water resist) came with one and I'm now on the third - Constant surfing kills the straps pretty quickly but nothing else fits and the rest of the watch is SO reliable that I'm loathe to ditch it (plus it has many important phone numbers on it).

    It just keeps on going and going - 8 years now!

    Straps are £25 a go but it seems worth it.

    Maybe some watches should say "man watch body 200m water resistant but the strap will probably die?"
    I would say it's impossible to treat leather to survive regular seawater immersion.
    Seiko SKZ7211J Atlas /Landshark (Japan version) automatic
    Casio G Shock GS1100 Giez, GT006 and GWX-8900
    Suunto Ambit3 Nepal Edition

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