What's wrong with having a 7750 movement?
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  1. #1
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    What's wrong with having a 7750 movement?

    This is somewhat of a rant. I've been reading posts on this site as well as the other site, and keep seeing how members write about a 7750 like it was a cheap unreliable car made in a third world country, and how it was better to have these new in-house movements. So I have to ask...

    Why do people think that a 7750 is inferior to other similar movements that are developed "in-house"? Wasn't a 7750 an "in-house" movement at one point? Has it not been in production for a long enough time to have proven itself as a reliable workhorse? Has an in-house movement ever gone head-to-head testing with a 7750 and come out much more superior in every way? So what if the 7750 doesn't cost as much as one of the in-house movements? I would rather have a reliable movement in my watch than a relatively new and fancy in-house movement decorated with a bunch of fancy baubles.

    Okay..rant's over. Sorry.

  2. #2
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    Re: What's wrong with having a 7750 movement?

    Nothing wrong at all with the ETA/Valjoux 7750. The 7750 is one of the most used chrono movements ever. Rough, reliable and accurate - a work horse. However I do prefer more sophisticated movements (Zenith, Lemania, GO). Have a closer look on how they are designed compared to an ETA/Valjoux 7750 and you will know why......
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  3. #3
    Member AAWATCHES's Avatar
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    Re: What's wrong with having a 7750 movement?

    No need to rant, many folks agree with you, 7750 is one of the best chrono movements ever made.

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  5. #4
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    Re: What's wrong with having a 7750 movement?

    Nothing wrong with a 7750. If you'd like to continue the car theme, you'd know this analogy: it's the Chevy 350 of automatic chronographs.

    Take a look around - many ETA movements get dissed in favor of in-house calibers, not just the 7750.

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    Re: What's wrong with having a 7750 movement?

    The ETA/Valjoux movements are like a MB Diesel. Very reliable, easy to service by a trained watchmaker, but not very exciting.
    Inhouse movements are of course much more exciting, usually beautifully done and finished.
    As yet, I do not own any Inhouse chrono movements, just the "Diesel" variety.
    I am not sure what my 1986 Breitling and Baume&Mercier (1950ies) contain.

  7. #6
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    Re: What's wrong with having a 7750 movement?

    foe amount of time the chronograph function gets used , ETA 7750 does its job well as other in house chronograph movements.

    Other chronograph movement that gets bad rap is DD modules used on ETA 28XX movements. LOL
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  8. #7
    heb
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    Re: What's wrong with having a 7750 movement?

    Quote Originally Posted by BaCaitlin View Post
    This is somewhat of a rant. I've been reading posts on this site as well as the other site, and keep seeing how members write about a 7750 like it was a cheap unreliable car made in a third world country, and how it was better to have these new in-house movements. So I have to ask...

    Why do people think that a 7750 is inferior to other similar movements that are developed "in-house"? Wasn't a 7750 an "in-house" movement at one point? Has it not been in production for a long enough time to have proven itself as a reliable workhorse? Has an in-house movement ever gone head-to-head testing with a 7750 and come out much more superior in every way? So what if the 7750 doesn't cost as much as one of the in-house movements? I would rather have a reliable movement in my watch than a relatively new and fancy in-house movement decorated with a bunch of fancy baubles.

    Okay..rant's over. Sorry.
    Hello Ba,
    The "Chronometer" grade variant is the best chronograph movement in the world with regards to long term reliability, accuracy, and stability of the average daily rate.

    The others that have been mentioned here may be more sophisticated (i.e very expensive), but they won't out perform the 7750.

    One of my other favorites is the Ebel 139 chrongraph movement; I've got 4 Ebel chornographs with it. They are accurate as all get out, but they don't have the stability of the 7750.

    heb

  9. #8
    Moderator at Large stuffler,mike's Avatar
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    Re: What's wrong with having a 7750 movement?

    Quote Originally Posted by heb View Post
    ....
    The "Chronometer" grade variant is the best chronograph movement in the world with regards to long term reliability, accuracy, and stability of the average daily rate.
    With all respect but this I doubt.....
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  10. #9
    v76
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    Re: What's wrong with having a 7750 movement?

    I agree with Mike here, not even close ... that crown still belongs to the El Primero. And, it has proven its durability to the naysayers (people who said that a high beat chrono movement wouldn't be durable) for over 40 years. And, it was built at a time when even 4 Hz movements weren't common.

    To add to that, Seiko's 6139 (and its successors) is a nicer movement than the 7750 available for less. Ubiquitous doesn't necessarily make something the best.

    I'm not knocking the 7750, it's a decent movement that does the job nicely.
    Last edited by v76; March 30th, 2010 at 18:37.
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  11. #10
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    Re: What's wrong with having a 7750 movement?

    El Primero is a great movement but has a somewhat higher reputation for fragility than other chronograph movements like a good 7750. Don't get me wrong, I love them but I don't think I'd classify it as best in the world.

    I don't think you can ever crown one chrono movement as best in the world anyway without any sort of real data.

    Nothing wrong with a standard 7750 as in there's nothing (hopefully) wrong with a Honda Civic. They're great value time tested designs but a bit boring and has some characteristics some people don't find pleasing like the wobble or the register layout or the easily damaged date complications. Personally I think the Omega/Lemania 1040 or the Lemania 5100 are better movements than the 7750 but some of my favorite watches are 7750 based like the Portuguese Chronograph and the Bremont ALT-1C.

    Some people like Civics, some people like Bimmers, some people like Audis, etc. Takes all kinds.


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