Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained - Page 3
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  1. #21
    Member KringleKriss's Avatar
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    Quote Originally Posted by Archer View Post
    cognoscenti
    Wow, what a fantactic word.

    Again compliments on the post.
    goodknifeworks likes this.

  2. #22
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    Thanks for posting Al. Very informative. I'm also glad you live close to the GTA. Do you work on watches with co-axial movements?

  3. #23
    Member Dixan's Avatar
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    Quote Originally Posted by Archer View Post
    Thanks for reminding me why I don't post here often. ;)

    Yes, it was an automatic Speedmaster - I apologize for the oversight in typing Pro - did not mean to offend the Omega cognoscenti.
    No harm done on either side.

    Cheers, Al

    Wait, I hope you don't mean that posts like mine above have been responsible for keeping you from posting as much as you probably would, without them. And I sincerely hope you did not take offense to me pointing that small detail out, as I certainly meant no offense to you by doing so. Quite the opposite, in fact. If anything, I thought I adequately expressed my appreciation and admiration for the effort you put into creating this thread. If that was not made clear enough before, please allow me to more clearly state that now: I found your post to be both informative and entertaining, and as someone who sometimes attempts to put together rather lengthy posts myself (though mine usually contain far less actually useful information), I can really appreciate how much effort you put into making your post. I simply figured you would be one who would appreciate accuracy, especially when discussing, in depth, things related to this little shared interest of ours....
    Last edited by Dixan; October 15th, 2011 at 17:23.


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  5. #24
    Member Quartersawn's Avatar
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    Awesome post Archer, thanks for the lesson! The "clutch" is not as complicated as I had imagined. The concise text and your photos explained it perfectly.

  6. #25
    Member Slant's Avatar
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    Thanks for taking the time to do this excellent write-up Al! An old patient says "hi!"


  7. #26
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    thats the kind of post that makes this place the best watch forum on the web. thanks so much for the great info.
    megamustang likes this.
    Ω 3570.50, Ω SM300, Ω 3221.30, Ω 2538.20.00, Ω 186.010, Ω 176.012,
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  8. #27
    lvt
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    Quote Originally Posted by Archer View Post
    Mainsprings break - it's a fact of life unfortunately. Modern alloy spring are much less prone to breaking however, and what I referred to was trying to break one by force in say an ETA 6497. Breaking it by forcing the crown would be difficult, however they do break - I have serviced many manual wind Panerai's with broken mainspring. It's by far the most common reason their models with the 6497 movement end up on my bench.

    Cheers, Al

    Thanks for your very helpful answer, so do you think leaving the watch completely unwound when not in use instead of using a watch winder is a good measure to keep the mainspring in good shape ?
    Ball - Casio (G-shock) - HMT - Longines - Parnis - Seagull - Steinhart - Tissot - Victorinox - Yema

  9. #28
    Member nkwjw's Avatar
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    This was great - very educational. Thank you for sharing you knowledge.
    Rolex Sub Date 116610 | Omega SMP Planet Ocean 45 (2200.50.00) | Casio WVA320

  10. #29
    Member ChronoScot's Avatar
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    A fantastic post, Al. Many thanks for taking the time to put it together.
    OMEGA | Jaeger-LeCoultre

  11. #30
    Member ChronoScot's Avatar
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    Al, I'd be interested to hear your perspective on the following thread, which covers some similar topics as your post and evolved through contributions from myself, Matt and lvt.

    https://forums.watchuseek.com/f20/pow...85-561915.html

    I was a little confused by the use of the term "clutch" until I started to read up on the cal 8500 a few months ago, and learned that the overwinding feature is achieved by a slipping spring and not by a device that would be typically called a clutch. If I'm not mistaken, the dual barrel system of the cal 8500 employs one barrel with a fixed spring and a second barrel with a slipping spring.

    Your post illustrates the mechanism beautifully. It is difficult to find resources on this on the Internet, and I'm not yet at the stage of taking apart my own watches...

    Anyway, any further notes or potential corrections to my posts would be most appreciated to ensure that it is a reliable resource.
    OMEGA | Jaeger-LeCoultre

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