Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained - Page 7
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  1. #61
    Member Eggsy's Avatar
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    Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    Excellent post. Very interesting to read. Thank you.


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    jayanth.11235 likes this.

  2. #62
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    I recently purchased a vintage Omega Seamaster with an automatic movement (Caliber 550). From my understanding, this caliber is an automatic which you can manually wind by turning the crown clockwise at the first position. However, the crown will not budge on this specific watch - seems like you can't manually wind it at all. I've been careful not to force it. The watchmaker I bought it from is saying that the only way to get the watch wound is through movement - although the more research I do the less I believe this explanation. The watch was left on a table for about 5 hours and I tried to manually wind it again, but the crown would not budge.

    Does anyone have any insight into this? Also, if this is a problem, any ideas on what might be causing it?

  3. #63
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    Thank you for the time it took to provide this most informative post. Really enjoyed it!
    Omega Speedmaster TT Classic
    Omega Seamaster Pro
    Rolex Daytona TT Panda
    Rolex Submariner SS Date
    Casio G Shock

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  5. #64
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    This movement should be able to be wound via the crown. Either something in the automatic mechanism is broken causing the winding wheel to jam up, or there is something wring in the setting mechanism - either way it's not working correctly, and the person who is telling you it can't be wound via the crown is not correct.

    Cheers, Al

  6. #65
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    Hello, this was a fantastic demonstration. Thank you for posting it!
    I was wondering if continuing to turn the crown when the mainspring is fully wound would sooner strip the teeth on the barrel (similar to stripping the head of a screw) than actually snap the mainspring?

  7. #66
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    That was great Archer. Your explanations above in simple language for all to understand are a wonderfully inspiring piece of work. You've given me the confidence to do my first watch repair successfully and a real boost to my ego. Thank you very much indeed.

  8. #67
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    Thank you. I know this is an old post, but new readers like me can still learn from it. I will no longer worry about 'over-winding' my hand wound as 'over-winding' isn't really possible! Great news.

  9. #68
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    Quote Originally Posted by Calumets View Post
    Thank you. I know this is an old post, but new readers like me can still learn from it. I will no longer worry about 'over-winding' my hand wound as 'over-winding' isn't really possible! Great news.
    Agreed, this is a great thread. Anything by Archer is WUS gold.

    I would maintain modern mechanicals can be overwound, but you have to wind carelessly to accomplish that. About a year ago I was winding my Hamilton Khaki at night, after a few cocktails, and was turning the crown with abandon and without paying attention to how many turns I had made. There was click and suddenly I realized the mainspring was broken. I was careless and made a rookie mistake despite having 6 handwinders.

    Now I am careful to count the number of turns - my handwinders, once running require 16-19 turns each morning to reach full wind.

    Edit: I had to decommission the watch, it cost me $260 and paid $150 to have it serviced a few years afterward. Spending more on the watch doesn't make sense.
    whineboy
    All mechanical, all the time

  10. #69
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    Re: Automatic and manual winding - some basics explained

    Great post Al, thank you

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