Omega PO braking in - Page 3
Like Tree24Likes

Thread: Omega PO braking in

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 32
  1. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,466

    Re: Omega PO braking in

    This is an extremely difficult concept to explain in a forum post. Here is an attempt. With mechanical watches that have a balance, hairspring and an escapement, there is an ideal called Isochronism. Isochronism is rate independent of amplitude. This is the perfect ideal of a mechanical watch that would make it a consistent timekeeper. However in reality that is not achievable due to several factors that inhibit Isochronism because they affect the amplitude of the watch, or the rate or both.

    Much of the advances in Horology are aimed at eliminating as many of these factors as possible, and I will name a few, I am sure you will recognize how some of these factors have been addressed in your latest Omega movement.

    1. Temperature (This causes a change in the hairspring and the balance, which affects the rate. The modern technology to fight this is Silicon)
    2. Magnetism (Omega has been actively working to remove this from their watches)
    3. Gravity (Never going away. The tolerances required to manufacture parts, and moving parts require play in order to have the ability to move as free as possible, means that the rate of the watch will change in various positions due to the gravity changing how those parts work with one another, typically seen in increased or decreased friction, which impacts rate.)
    4. Friction (Never going away, but advances in materials and lubrication reduce friction. Moving parts have friction, this does impact rate.)
    5. External Shocks (We wear these on our wrists, and many people wear their watches during physical activities, these shocks impact rate. The silicon hairspring helps with reducing this.)
    There are more, but this will suffice.

    As you can see, the modern watch is a marvel that it can be as accurate as it is on your wrist. But due to tolerances in manufacturing parts, and the effects of gravity have on those tolerances as the watch changes positions as you wear it, you will have a variance of rate in positions, and the tighter that is, the better the timekeeper the watch is. The maximum deviation between rates is called Delta. Then you also take the rates for the positions that the watch is adjusted for (typically five) add them together and then divide by five and that is the average daily rate in seconds per day, since the watch is worn and in motion in various positions. Timing a watch in one position only gives you the rate of the watch in that one position, the accuracy will be different when worn, due to the factors I mentioned and also changes in amplitude based on the state of the wind of the watch throughout the day affect rate...

    Amplitude is probably another discussion, but suffice that amplitude affects rate and therefore Isochronism only exists as an idea. We don't have a mechanical mainspring that puts out a perfectly flat torque output for consistent power to the balance (but there are inventions that can get close or around this problem), gravity affects the moving parts increasing friction in some positions which reduces amplitude and changes the rate etc.

    So it is all very complex, and there are many variables that affect rate. When you consider these things and find that a watch can keep time to within seconds per day, it really is remarkable!

    P.S. There is no breaking in of a movement by the time you purchase it. That was done long ago during the QC period of the watch before you purchased it. Typically within the first 24 hours of the watch being serviced. However, in some circumstances an issue can arise months after the watch is purchased or serviced that affects the timekeeping that did not show up during the QC period. This is what a warranty is for.
    Last edited by SpringDriven; 2 Weeks Ago at 20:44.

  2. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    263
    It's literally functioning as perfect as it could possibly function, smack dab in the middle of what Omega claims it should be running at. Why exactly are you disappointed in the performance?
    brandon\ likes this.

  3. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    15

    Re: Omega PO braking in

    Quote Originally Posted by DiegoCastellanos View Post
    It's literally functioning as perfect as it could possibly function, smack dab in the middle of what Omega claims it should be running at. Why exactly are you disappointed in the performance?
    Im not disappointed in the performance. I would still like to see a +0,5s/d =)

  4. Remove Advertisements
    WatchUSeek.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #24
    Member kevinkar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    636

    Re: Omega PO braking in

    Quote Originally Posted by Teammella View Post
    Im not disappointed in the performance. I would still like to see a +0,5s/d =)
    While some watches are magically "perfect" timekeepers, .5spd is unreasonable to expect even after adjusting. Common mechanical watches are not this accurate. The only way to achieve this value is by luck, way more money, or quartz. OR figure out what position you need to put the watch in when not wearing it so you can manually average it out to as close to .5spd as you can.
    brandon\ likes this.

  6. #25
    Member koolpep's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Dubai, UAE
    Posts
    952

    Re: Omega PO braking in

    Quote Originally Posted by kevinkar View Post
    While some watches are magically "perfect" timekeepers, .5spd is unreasonable to expect even after adjusting. Common mechanical watches are not this accurate. The only way to achieve this value is by luck, way more money, or quartz. OR figure out what position you need to put the watch in when not wearing it so you can manually average it out to as close to .5spd as you can.
    I have three watches that get there.... all from Rolex/Tudor gaining 3-4 seconds a week. But I also have a Tudor that runs 4 seconds a day fast. Dial up at night, worn for around 12-14 hours.

    I have one watch that runs 1 spd slow. I hate it. I can live with 6 seconds fast but I can’t have watches going slow.

    My Omega is +1 spd in the last measurement but I didn’t wear it in the last 10 days so it run out of steam and wasn’t on the winder. Anyhow. In measurements before that it was up to +5 secs. I stored it differently I guess.

    Watches in profile....

  7. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    7

    Re: Omega PO braking in

    You could try another wearing pattern and those accuracy figures would look different. As mentioned above, accuracy depends on how its used


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #27
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    15
    Well. Today it's averaging 1.6s/d. That's one second better than it started out with.. I hope it will settle around this time.
    Attached Images Attached Images


  9. #28
    Member VicLeChic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    3,082

    Re: Omega PO braking in

    Give it time. My co-ax Speedy took a few days to fall below +2 s/d. I don't know about my PO2500, bought it 15 years ago so not much of time track history until the last couple of years, also below +2 s/d on average.

  10. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by VicLeChic View Post
    Give it time. My co-ax Speedy took a few days to fall below +2 s/d. I don't know about my PO2500, bought it 15 years ago so not much of time track history until the last couple of years, also below +2 s/d on average.
    most of all I think it fun to measure the watches. Now it's Down to 1s/d since this morning.. My biggest concern is that it could go to the minus side....

  11. #30
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    31

    Re: Omega PO braking in

    From Omega say, there may be deviations of a few seconds + per day, but never a minus. Not that this is not happening, but then additional regulation is already being made, which is covered by the guarantee.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •