Hello all,

I am not a collector but the owner of an Omega wall clock. The clock has not been ticking for decades and for a long time I have been looking for an expert repairman. Preferably a professional, but because people regularly state that they cannot help me, a hobby clockmaker will also do.

Among the amateurs, it appears that a few were less knowledgeable than they thougt. I found this out after the clock, having worked for a short time, had stopped ticking again. Then the professionals gave comments on the "quality" of the amateur repair work.

Professionals faced the problem that the clock appears to be a rare version. Even at the Omega factory this clock is unknown. There are no drawings of it, and finding spare parts is a big problem. Having parts made would be so expensive that it exceeds the value of the clock.

Because the clock is a family piece and therefore has emotional value, I hope to meet someone here who can help me with advice and / or help to repair this clock.

The clock is built before the Second World War and ended up in my family in what was then the Dutch East Indies. It is an Omega wall clock porbably made of Mahogany wood. It is square with a side of 28.8 cm and a thickness of 3.2 cm (excluding spacers to the wall). See photo 1 and 2.

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When the lid of the timepiece is removed, the timepiece reads: “Seven 7 jewels, two 2 adjustments, 8 days”. See photo 3.
The serial number of the timepiece is 6706401. With research on the internet I found out that this indicates the year of construction 1923.
One of the professionals describes the timepiece as a 59-8D caliber.

The same professional indicates that the damage in the clock is consequential damage from a previous "repair". During this repair, the winding pin is soldered to the winding shaft. See photos 4 and 5.
This was once done because the clock was no longer winding up.

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It is very likely that there was a coupling system between the winding pin and the winding shaft that was removed (defective?). That is why the pin and the shaft had to be soldered together.
The suspicion of this coupling system is due to the fact that there is a hole in the cabinet that is much larger than the thickness of the winding pin. The coupling system would have been in this hole. See photo 5.

The purpose of this coupling system would be to turn the clock (spring tensioning) during the outgoing stroke of the winding crown and not mechanically load the clockwork during the return stroke.
A mechanical separation could also be made between the pin and the shaft. This is important if the clockwork has to be taken out of the clock. The long winding pin can then remain in the wooden case, while the winding shaft can remain in the clockwork housing.
Presently a screw in the clockwork must be loosened first before the whole (winding pin + winding shaft) can be removed.
It is likely that this coupling system also determines whether the clock is turned up or the hands are adjusted (set the goblet). The latter is done by pulling the winding crown down with the winding shaft (disconnecting the winding system).

The big question now is: is this priesumtion correct, and how can I reach coupling system?

But that's not all. A conical gearwheel of the winding system has been irreparably damaged (photo 4). Isn't that part called the renuregear? Where can a replacement copy of this conical gear be obtained or where can I have something affordable, milled?

The last parts that needs to be replaced are the ressort spiral and balance wheel, or even better: the ressort spiral and a complete escapement. The question is also: where can I get a replacement?

The best thing would be if I could get the same, defective, clock to be able to make 2 non-working ones into one functioning.

Thank you for your help

Alex