Oris Aquis - selitta SW movement
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  1. #1
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    Oris Aquis - selitta SW movement

    Hi there,

    I have had my Aquis 7730 for less than a year. On full power (20 turns or so of the crown) the watch gains a very respectable 3 or seconds a day. I happy with that. The problem is with constant wear for more than week, the acurracy gets progressively worse LOSING seonds a day. I understand the nuances of the SW movement, but it appears when the power reserve is reducing it accelerates in losing seconds. In addition I would have thought general wear would maintain a reasonable level of power reserve?

    Should i ge the watch serviced or is this normal. Thoughts appreciated.

  2. #2
    heb
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    Re: Oris Aquis - selitta SW movement

    Unfortunately, my experience with Sellita, and every other automatic mechanical watch, is similar to yours. After two weeks of wear, they all go into a well defined losing trend with each weekly derived average daily rate slower than the previous one. I wear my watches 23+ hours per day and I am not an invalid so you would think it could maintain a full wind. A average daily rate delta after a year of wear is typically 5 seconds or so. I recently did a power reserve experiment with a Steinhart ETA 2824 equipped watch. Fully wound, then placed dial up on a desk, it showed a power reserve of 44 hours. I then fully wound it again and wore it for 21 days straight, 23+ hours/day on wrist, then placed it on the same desk. The power reserve was only 34 hours. Perhaps if I ran a marathon a couple of times a week wearing the watch may have improved the reserve. I guess winding efficiency is very poor, but "standard" in mechanical watches. Just another reason for wearing quartz watches.

    heb
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  3. #3
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    Re: Oris Aquis - selitta SW movement

    With constant wear mine is losing about 15 seconds a day. Sure wish it was running slightly fast:(

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    Re: Oris Aquis - selitta SW movement

    Only one of my SW200s has done any long term running and it was pretty accurate. Unless your watch is due for a service anyway I don’t think there’s a great deal to be gained by having it looked at.

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    Re: Oris Aquis - selitta SW movement

    Quote Originally Posted by heb View Post
    I recently did a power reserve experiment with a Steinhart ETA 2824 equipped watch. Fully wound, then placed dial up on a desk, it showed a power reserve of 44 hours. I then fully wound it again and wore it for 21 days straight, 23+ hours/day on wrist, then placed it on the same desk. The power reserve was only 34 hours. Perhaps if I ran a marathon a couple of times a week wearing the watch may have improved the reserve. I guess winding efficiency is very poor, but "standard" in mechanical watches. Just another reason for wearing quartz watches.
    That's a very interesting experiment you did there, and with interesting results. I have to say, it doesn't completely surprise me. I feel the automatic winding system (as a whole, not just Sellita's) is more of a "best effort" to prolong a movement's stored power. It's kind of like the regenerative braking in an electric vehicle. When you brake, kinetic power is sent back to the battery packs to charge them. It's obviously not enough to run the vehicle perpetually, but it gives you more range (for argument's sake, +20 miles on a 200 mile original charge). I see the automatic winding system being fairly similar. In a 24 hour period, you lose 24 hours of power, gain 23 hours back from automatic winding. Eventually, after weeks and weeks, you end up with an empty power reserve because even though you're mitigating loss, you're still ending each day in the negative.

    I'd be curious how movements like Rolex's in-house compare.
    heb and Jeff Scott like this.
    Before you ask, yes, I've seen -45 degrees (both Celsius and Fahrenheit)

  7. #6
    heb
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    Re: Oris Aquis - selitta SW movement

    Quote Originally Posted by Yukoner1 View Post
    That's a very interesting experiment you did there, and with interesting results. I have to say, it doesn't completely surprise me. I feel the automatic winding system (as a whole, not just Sellita's) is more of a "best effort" to prolong a movement's stored power. It's kind of like the regenerative braking in an electric vehicle. When you brake, kinetic power is sent back to the battery packs to charge them. It's obviously not enough to run the vehicle perpetually, but it gives you more range (for argument's sake, +20 miles on a 200 mile original charge). I see the automatic winding system being fairly similar. In a 24 hour period, you lose 24 hours of power, gain 23 hours back from automatic winding. Eventually, after weeks and weeks, you end up with an empty power reserve because even though you're mitigating loss, you're still ending each day in the negative.

    I'd be curious how movements like Rolex's in-house compare.
    Good analogy. Six years ago I wore my new Rolex Datejust for 4 consecutive months. It too followed a similar trend, but with only miniscule loss. Here are its 4 monthly derived average daily rates, respectively (for convenience, 1 "month" = 4 weeks): -2.2/-2.4/-2.5/-2.5. That's an average daily rate delta of only -0.3 seconds over that period and as close to a "stable" movement as I own. By comparison, two years ago I purchased an IWC Pilot Watch (an Mk XI tribute) and wore it every day for 7 consecutive months (on wrist 23+ hours/day). Its fastest average daily rate was Month 2: +2.4 s/d. It then started a well defined and consistent slowing trend each month with Month 7's average daily rate of +0.4. That's a delta of -2 seconds over a 6 month period (the fastest rate was month 2). So projecting over a year of wear, my watch would be running at about -2.0 seconds per day. Individually, each monthly rate was terrific by anyone's standard, I know that. But nonetheless, I also know that the Sellita 300 movement within is a UNSTABLE one as are just about all my mechanical self winding movements -- from cheap Russian and Asian ones to quality ETA/Sellita movements and even higher grade Marine Chronometer Omega ones. Just the nature of the beast I guess.

    heb

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    Re: Oris Aquis - selitta SW movement

    A watch is most accurate at the top 25% of its power reserve, everything appears normal.

  9. #8
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    Re: Oris Aquis - selitta SW movement

    Quote Originally Posted by heb View Post
    Good analogy. Six years ago I wore my new Rolex Datejust for 4 consecutive months. It too followed a similar trend, but with only miniscule loss. Here are its 4 monthly derived average daily rates, respectively (for convenience, 1 "month" = 4 weeks): -2.2/-2.4/-2.5/-2.5. That's an average daily rate delta of only -0.3 seconds over that period and as close to a "stable" movement as I own. By comparison, two years ago I purchased an IWC Pilot Watch (an Mk XI tribute) and wore it every day for 7 consecutive months (on wrist 23+ hours/day). Its fastest average daily rate was Month 2: +2.4 s/d. It then started a well defined and consistent slowing trend each month with Month 7's average daily rate of +0.4. That's a delta of -2 seconds over a 6 month period (the fastest rate was month 2). So projecting over a year of wear, my watch would be running at about -2.0 seconds per day. Individually, each monthly rate was terrific by anyone's standard, I know that. But nonetheless, I also know that the Sellita 300 movement within is a UNSTABLE one as are just about all my mechanical self winding movements -- from cheap Russian and Asian ones to quality ETA/Sellita movements and even higher grade Marine Chronometer Omega ones. Just the nature of the beast I guess.
    That's some really specific metrics you got there. I'm impressed just that you were able to be diligent enough to track that over months and months of time. Interesting to see that Rolex fared better, although I would have assumed that without any evidence to prove it, so it's not that surprising to me.
    Before you ask, yes, I've seen -45 degrees (both Celsius and Fahrenheit)

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    Re: Oris Aquis - selitta SW movement

    Quote Originally Posted by heb View Post
    Good analogy. Six years ago I wore my new Rolex Datejust for 4 consecutive months. It too followed a similar trend, but with only miniscule loss. Here are its 4 monthly derived average daily rates, respectively (for convenience, 1 "month" = 4 weeks): -2.2/-2.4/-2.5/-2.5. That's an average daily rate delta of only -0.3 seconds over that period and as close to a "stable" movement as I own. By comparison, two years ago I purchased an IWC Pilot Watch (an Mk XI tribute) and wore it every day for 7 consecutive months (on wrist 23+ hours/day). Its fastest average daily rate was Month 2: +2.4 s/d. It then started a well defined and consistent slowing trend each month with Month 7's average daily rate of +0.4. That's a delta of -2 seconds over a 6 month period (the fastest rate was month 2). So projecting over a year of wear, my watch would be running at about -2.0 seconds per day. Individually, each monthly rate was terrific by anyone's standard, I know that. But nonetheless, I also know that the Sellita 300 movement within is a UNSTABLE one as are just about all my mechanical self winding movements -- from cheap Russian and Asian ones to quality ETA/Sellita movements and even higher grade Marine Chronometer Omega ones. Just the nature of the beast I guess.

    heb
    Well, the only logical answer is you need more watches to rotate through. Wearing the same watch for weeks/months at a time? The horror!
    JonS1967 likes this.

  11. #10
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    Re: Oris Aquis - selitta SW movement

    I work a desk job and have a Panerai with a power reserve. On days I don't go to the gym or walk much I either stay the same on the reserve or loose a hair. When I hit the gym my power meter becomes fully topped off every time. Do an evening walk for 30 min and you'll never have an issue and you'll be more fit...

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