Orient Star Retro Future Road Bike WZ0011DK review
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  1. #1
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    Orient Star Retro Future Road Bike WZ0011DK review

    Orient Star Retro-Future Road Bike WZ0011DK





    I consent Orient to use this review if they wish.

    Specs

    Movement: 40S60, automatic with hand winding, hacking, 24 jewels
    Case material: stainless steel + polyurethane ring
    Crystal (front and back): Flat mineral glass
    Bracelet: hard urethane + stainless steel, push button folding clasp
    Lug width: 20 mm
    Accuracy: +25/-15 sec daily rate
    WR: 10 ATM
    Power reserve: 40 hours
    Weight: 123 g
    Case thickness: 12.2 mm
    Case diameter: 42.0 mm (56.3 mm lug to lug)
    Functions: power reserve indicator

    This is a sports watch from Orient's Retro-Future collection. The design is inspired by a motorcycle. I got this watch one year ago in Japan. It is available on Rakuten for less than 50,000 yen (approx 500.00 USD).





    Movement
    According to the back of the case, it is a DK movement. Other than the specs listed above, I am unable to find any other information on the movement. The daily rate values seem to indicate one of Orient's medium grade movements, consistent with the price of the watch.

    From what is visible through the crystal, there is only light decoration. The back displays perlage on the bridge and Côtes de Genève on the rotor, both fairly faint. The dial side of the movement shows no decoration, but the main plate is skeletonised. The balance is visible through the dial side.

    I would characterise the rotor motion as coarse. The rotor is loud and its movement can be felt. From what I understand, this movement is designed to be rugged and reliable, not sophisticated. And this is how the movement feels. The hand winding is useful as I find it slightly slow to auto-wind.

    I am unable to measure the accuracy of this watch since it is impossible to read the seconds on this watch (more on that below).
    While I am not wowed by the movement, in this price range I find it perfectly acceptable for a Japanese in-house movement.




    Dial

    This is one of the highlights of this watch in terms of design. The dial is partly skeletonised and parts of the movement can be seen, showcasing the balance, which looks like a motocycle wheel in motion. The power reserve at 6 o'clock is legible. The hands and indexes (including the "12") are generously luminous and easily read in the dark.

    While the overall design of the dial is interesting and attracted me to the watch in the first place, it is also the source of my biggest criticism. Notice the small seconds at 12 o'clock: a disk with a red line through it. It is impossible to read the seconds! I do not understand this design decision at all. A simple arrow on one end of the red line would have sufficed. The movement already has small seconds and hacks, why make the seconds unreadable?




    Case and bracelet

    For me these represent the best aspects of this watch. The case is very well finished. The case itself is mirror finished, with a splash of colour in a ring running along its circumference. The lugs are mainly satin finished with a unique design.

    The bracelet is made to look like a bike chain and is very light and comfortable. The unusual urethane/SS bracelet adds a unique quality to the watch.

    Case width is 42 mm, 56.3 mm lug to lug. It fits my 7" wrist well, especially since the lugs are angled downward.
    Another unusual aspect of this watch is the crown at 9 o'clock instead of 3 o'clock. The crown has a socket for an Allen key (hex key)! Though you certainly don't need one to turn the crown, as it is easy to pull,grip and turn.

    Crystal
    Since the retail price for the watch is around 70,000 yen, I find it curious that the crystal is not sapphire. I cannot confirm the grade of mineral glass used, but it does seem to be high grade. Strangely, the front crystal sticks out ever so slightly above the bezel. Normally this would make it prone to scratches, but after one year of use it still looks perfectly intact. So while it is not sapphire crystal, it is not a dealbreaker.

    Conclusion

    Pros:

    • In-house Japanese movement
    • Case finish and detail
    • Bracelet design

    Cons:

    • Unreadable seconds
    • Loud rotor movement

    After one year of owning this watch I still very much enjoy the bold and unique design of this watch. At 70,000 yen retail I find it slightly overpriced due to the unreadable seconds and no sapphire crystal. However, at 50,000 yen it is a good price for an in-house movement with excellent finish and detailing.
    Last edited by Evernoob; May 13th, 2013 at 09:53. Reason: spelling and formatting

  2. #2
    Member DJW GB's Avatar
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    Re: Orient Star Retro Future Road Bike WZ0011DK review

    Thanks for that great review " Evernoob " . It is very nice to read a review that is not flossing over any minor indiscrepancies and telling it like it is. Also after a year is a good time to notice these things that you may not in a few weeks of ownership. I agree with you about the second hand and must admit i had not noticed it on previous looks of the face. The one thing that i had noticed was the way the lugs are fitted to the case , are they machined from the case or some how sweated or brazed on to the main case. I mention this as it could be a weak spot perhaps, although you would have noticed by now. Also the 20mm lug width i thought might be to small but it looks in proportion with the case just right. Anyway thanks for taking the time to write this review . Thanks . DW.

  3. #3
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    Re: Orient Star Retro Future Road Bike WZ0011DK review

    Quote Originally Posted by DJW GB View Post
    ... The one thing that i had noticed was the way the lugs are fitted to the case , are they machined from the case or some how sweated or brazed on to the main case. I mention this as it could be a weak spot perhaps, although you would have noticed by now...
    The finishing of the case and the lugs extend all the way to the joint between the two. The joint forms a very small angle, so I'm guessing it could not have been machined. Here are some macro shots (was tough to focus camera with all the reflection), maybe you could tell if it's brazed?

    It's firmly held together with zero give and feels sturdy. I've had no problems with it so far. Will report back if ever there's a problem.

    DJW GB likes this.

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  5. #4
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    Re: Orient Star Retro Future Road Bike WZ0011DK review

    Thanks for the pictures .As you say its hard to see but I do not think they are machined. They look like some type of weld and then polished , its great to see that there is a lot of work gone into that part of the watch. thanks for getting back with that . cheers .DW.

  6. #5
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    Re: Orient Star Retro Future Road Bike WZ0011DK review

    Quote Originally Posted by Evernoob View Post
    Orient Star Retro-Future Road Bike WZ0011DK





    I consent Orient to use this review if they wish.

    Specs

    Movement: 40S60, automatic with hand winding, hacking, 24 jewels
    Case material: stainless steel + polyurethane ring
    Crystal (front and back): Flat mineral glass
    Bracelet: hard urethane + stainless steel, push button folding clasp
    Lug width: 20 mm
    Accuracy: +25/-15 sec daily rate
    WR: 10 ATM
    Power reserve: 40 hours
    Weight: 123 g
    Case thickness: 12.2 mm
    Case diameter: 42.0 mm (56.3 mm lug to lug)
    Functions: power reserve indicator

    This is a sports watch from Orient's Retro-Future collection. The design is inspired by a motorcycle. I got this watch one year ago in Japan. It is available on Rakuten for less than 50,000 yen (approx 500.00 USD).





    Movement
    According to the back of the case, it is a DK movement. Other than the specs listed above, I am unable to find any other information on the movement. The daily rate values seem to indicate one of Orient's medium grade movements, consistent with the price of the watch.

    From what is visible through the crystal, there is only light decoration. The back displays perlage on the bridge and Côtes de Genève on the rotor, both fairly faint. The dial side of the movement shows no decoration, but the main plate is skeletonised. The balance is visible through the dial side.

    I would characterise the rotor motion as coarse. The rotor is loud and its movement can be felt. From what I understand, this movement is designed to be rugged and reliable, not sophisticated. And this is how the movement feels. The hand winding is useful as I find it slightly slow to auto-wind.

    I am unable to measure the accuracy of this watch since it is impossible to read the seconds on this watch (more on that below).
    While I am not wowed by the movement, in this price range I find it perfectly acceptable for a Japanese in-house movement.




    Dial

    This is one of the highlights of this watch in terms of design. The dial is partly skeletonised and parts of the movement can be seen, showcasing the balance, which looks like a motocycle wheel in motion. The power reserve at 6 o'clock is legible. The hands and indexes (including the "12") are generously luminous and easily read in the dark.

    While the overall design of the dial is interesting and attracted me to the watch in the first place, it is also the source of my biggest criticism. Notice the small seconds at 12 o'clock: a disk with a red line through it. It is impossible to read the seconds! I do not understand this design decision at all. A simple arrow on one end of the red line would have sufficed. The movement already has small seconds and hacks, why make the seconds unreadable?




    Case and bracelet

    For me these represent the best aspects of this watch. The case is very well finished. The case itself is mirror finished, with a splash of colour in a ring running along its circumference. The lugs are mainly satin finished with a unique design.

    The bracelet is made to look like a bike chain and is very light and comfortable. The unusual urethane/SS bracelet adds a unique quality to the watch.

    Case width is 42 mm, 56.3 mm lug to lug. It fits my 7" wrist well, especially since the lugs are angled downward.
    Another unusual aspect of this watch is the crown at 9 o'clock instead of 3 o'clock. The crown has a socket for an Allen key (hex key)! Though you certainly don't need one to turn the crown, as it is easy to pull,grip and turn.

    Crystal
    Since the retail price for the watch is around 70,000 yen, I find it curious that the crystal is not sapphire. I cannot confirm the grade of mineral glass used, but it does seem to be high grade. Strangely, the front crystal sticks out ever so slightly above the bezel. Normally this would make it prone to scratches, but after one year of use it still looks perfectly intact. So while it is not sapphire crystal, it is not a dealbreaker.

    Conclusion

    Pros:

    • In-house Japanese movement
    • Case finish and detail
    • Bracelet design

    Cons:

    • Unreadable seconds
    • Loud rotor movement

    After one year of owning this watch I still very much enjoy the bold and unique design of this watch. At 70,000 yen retail I find it slightly overpriced due to the unreadable seconds and no sapphire crystal. However, at 50,000 yen it is a good price for an in-house movement with excellent finish and detailing.
    Please note this watch is NOT inspired by a motorcycle. It's inspiration is a bicycle, specifically, a classic 'road bike'. That is why it has brazed lugs, to reflect the brazed lugs on a classic, steel-framed road bike. Also, the power reserve indicator is in the shape of a down tube gear change lever typical of same, just as the coloured parts reflect the frame tubes, the heart is the front sprocket, the second dial is the rear sprocket, and so on.

    Every description I have read of this watch describes the top glass as crystal, not mineral glass.
    Last edited by Beadhead; December 8th, 2014 at 02:59.

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