Depth rating......

Thread: Depth rating......

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  1. #1
    Member Chris W's Avatar
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    Off topic Depth rating......

    Hi guy's,

    Glad the forum is back up and running - keep up the good work Ernie

    Anyway - I've been pondering over the last couple of days (well since someone pointed out that my bath wasn't 200m deep...O|), dive watches are given various depth ratings right? so we know the Doxa Sub750T is rated to 750m, but what is the human body rated to?

    I mean your watch will survive 750m, but I'm assuming (not being a diver - yet ) that due to pressures etc that the human body can only go a certain depth unassisted (i.e. without submersible etc).

    So my questions are:
    1. What depth can you 'dive unassisted' to?

    and

    2. Why does a watch need to be depth rated way more than you can dive to?

    Cheers

    Chris

  2. #2
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    Re: Depth rating......

    Well .. there you have some damn good questions ...

    Isn't the professional free-divers going for 110m or Am I dreaming? Maybe I have seen to much movies durring the years =)) The Big Blue etc. =))

    //Maw

  3. #3
    Member Arthur's Avatar
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    Re: Depth rating......

    I believe that mixed gas divers (Commercial divers breathing heliox and living in a chamber) Are working at many hundred feet. I don't know the depth that rigid suits are required to compensate for the water pressure.

    I was reading somewhere a few nights back about a French woman who attempted to break the free dive record of 531 feet. She made the record depth, but perished on the ascent. Probably easy to get this info on the internet Google "Free dive record, Scuba Record, mixed gas record, etc.

    I believe we have several Commercial divers here on the Doxa forum, possibly they could weigh in with the accurate info.
    Divers - Pre Sub Doxa 300m Dive Watch - Doxa Sub 300T Professional (US Divers) - Ocean7 LM-7 Ploprof - Ocean7 LM-7 Plorof Pro Titanium -Rolex 1665 SD-Rolex 1680 -Rolex 16610 Submariner - MKII Stingray 60 - MKII Kingston Gilt/non date - MKII Kingston Gilt/Date - Orthos 300 Commander
    Others- MKII Key West GMT(on the way) - Rolex GMT 16750 - IWC Calatrava - Ocean7 LM-5 GMT- Maurice Lacroix Calendrier Retrograde - Longines Hour Angle Lindberg - Tudor "Big Block" Chrono

    Myla's Favorite's Doxa Sub 200 Coralline, Omega Seamaster 120 - Rolex Datejust 18k/SS - Chronosport Panther - Maurice Lacroix - Omega 14k Mesh - Tag Heuer TT Aquaracer

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  5. #4
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    Re: Depth rating......

    I've been down to 120 feet bleow sea level on regular comressed air. That's real close to the limit for compressed air. I believe that Technical divers (using blends of gases other than regular air) can go deeper. I have no idea what a hard-hat diver can do!
    As for having a watch that can go deeper than I can. The speed limit here in California is 65 miles per hour, but I own a car that can go faster than that, okay, okay..it's a Ford, so it doesn't go much faster than that!

  6. #5
    Member Arthur's Avatar
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    Re: Depth rating......

    Here are some records for various catagories of divers

    FreeStyle Men:
    150492Umberto PelizzariItaly24oct1999Santa Margherita Ligure, Italy2'57"

    Mark Ellyatt, a British technical diving instructor, set a new world record for the deepest scuba dive when he descended to a depth of 313 meters (1,026.9 ft

    No information about commercial divers working out of habitats where they remain at the working depth pressure for several days and only decompress when their work cycle is finished except this article in Timezone.

    Braving the deeps likewise is not led by scientists, but by the commercial divers who build and maintain our undersea infrastructure. Saturation diving is the hazardous means by which they exceed the stern 43 meter (130ft) safe limit of conventional air diving. Today's commercial and military saturation divers work within a maximum depth limit of some 600 meters (2000ft) - still only a toe dipped into oceans whose deepest point lies over 11,000 meters below the surface.

    The primary focus of saturation diving is extended duration at moderate (beyond air diving) depths rather than extreme depth per se. While the current technical limit of open water saturation diving is 600 meters, the high cost of equipment and support means that the practical economic limit is about 300 meters (1000ft), and most of the specialized technology required to access that environment is designed with this lower limit as its maximum. In truth, few saturation divers have worked regularly in depths beyond 150 meters (500ft).
    Divers - Pre Sub Doxa 300m Dive Watch - Doxa Sub 300T Professional (US Divers) - Ocean7 LM-7 Ploprof - Ocean7 LM-7 Plorof Pro Titanium -Rolex 1665 SD-Rolex 1680 -Rolex 16610 Submariner - MKII Stingray 60 - MKII Kingston Gilt/non date - MKII Kingston Gilt/Date - Orthos 300 Commander
    Others- MKII Key West GMT(on the way) - Rolex GMT 16750 - IWC Calatrava - Ocean7 LM-5 GMT- Maurice Lacroix Calendrier Retrograde - Longines Hour Angle Lindberg - Tudor "Big Block" Chrono

    Myla's Favorite's Doxa Sub 200 Coralline, Omega Seamaster 120 - Rolex Datejust 18k/SS - Chronosport Panther - Maurice Lacroix - Omega 14k Mesh - Tag Heuer TT Aquaracer

  7. #6
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    Re: Depth rating......

    I was a saturation diver in the North Sea in the 80's. My deepest dive was 200m( 665 feet). If you could find the right breathing gases or fluids for that matter, there is no limit to the depths you could go. The main reason is that you have the same pressures inside the body(breathing gas) and outside the body(water pressure)For example: at the surface the pressure of the air we breathe is 14.7 psi and the pressure of the atmosphere pushing against us is 14.7 psi. The equalise eachother. At 600 feet the pressure of the gas we breathe(usually helium/oxygen) is 300psi, the external water pressure is 300 psi- the same ratio as on the surface.

    A watch's waterproof setting is a guideline only, depending upon the case deisign/seals. Also, you could have tremendous water pressure on a watch at the surface when being dumped by a huge wave!

    Here are some guidelines:drag curser across to make visible!!-computer's gone crazy.
    Water Resistance

    Frequently asked questions.


    1. What makes a watch water-resistant?


    [img]file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Gary/My%20Documents/Water%20Resistance%20in%20a%20Wristwatch_files/Colour-waterproof-tester.jpg[/img]There are several features that help make a watch water-resistant. The most important is the gaskets, or 0 rings-made of rubber, nylon or Teflon which form watertight seals at the joints where the crystal, case back and crown meet the watch case. If the watch is a chronograph, the chronograph pushers will also have gaskets.


    In addition, water-resistant watchcases are lined with a sealant, applied in the form of a quick-hardening liquid, which helps keep water out.

    The thickness and material of the case is also a big factor in determining whether a watch can safely be worn underwater. The case must be sturdy enough to withstand pressure without caving in, general this means a steel or titanium case or a steel case plated with gold, manufacturers say. Solid gold cases can be water resistant provided they are sufficiently thick.

    A screw-in case back, as opposed to one that pushes in, also contributes to a watch's water resistance. A screw-in crown, a feature of many divers' watches, helps prevent water getting into the case through the watch-stem hole. When it is screwed down it forms a watertight seal much like the seal between a jar and its lid.

    2. Why aren't watches ever labelled or described in advertising as "waterproof" even if they can be worn deep-sea diving?

    According to guidelines issued by the Federal Trade Commission, watch marketers are not allowed to label their watches "water-proof." Even watches designed for deep-sea diving cannot claim to be waterproof.

    3. My watch is labelled "water-resistant to 50 meters" but the manufacturer's instructions say I can only wear it swimming, not snorkelling or diving. Why is that?

    The different levels of water resistance as expressed in meters are only theoretical. They refer to the depth at which a watch will keep out water if both watch and the water are perfectly motionless. These conditions, of course, are never met in the real swimmer's or diver's world. In real life, the movement of the wearer's arm through the water increases the pressure on the watch dramatically; so it can't be worn to the depths indicated by lab testing machines.

    4. What are the various levels of water-resistance?

    Watches with the lowest level of water resistance are labelled simply "water-resistant." They can withstand splashes of water but should not be submerged. Above that (or below it, literally speaking), the most common designations are

    -30 meters (1 meter is about 3.3 feet) Not suitable for any immersion in water, but will withstand splashes of water.

    -50 meters, which means the watch, is suitable for surface swimming.

    -100 meters, indicating it can be worn snorkelling.

    -200 meters, suitable for recreational scuba diving.

    -1,000 meters (roughly three-fifths of a mile).

    Watches in this last category can endure deep-sea diving. Their gaskets are made of materials that can withstand the helium used in decompression chambers. Some have valves that let the wearer release the helium that has seeped into the watch so the case won't explode as the watch and diver adjust to normal atmospheric conditions.



    Keep in mind that the depth specified on the watch dial represents the results of tests done in the laboratory, not in the ocean.






    5. I've seen the abbreviation ATM used in labelling degrees of water resistance. What does it mean?

    It stands for "atmosphere" and it's equal to 10 meters of water pressure. Another word for "atmosphere" is "bar," which is often used in Europe.

    6. Is water resistance permanent?

    No. Water resistance depends on several factors, some of which can be affected by wear or simply by time. Gaskets can become contaminated or misshapen, cases distorted or crystals loose or broken. That's why your watch, like your car and your teeth, needs preventive maintenance.

    7. How often does water resistance need to be checked?

    At least once a year. Most manufacturers say water resistance needs to be tested every time the case back is opened, because opening the case can dislodge the gaskets. This rule applies even to a simple battery change. (Many service centres also change the gaskets whenever a watch comes in for service.)

    8. How is water resistance tested?

    There are basically two ways of machine testing water resistance, referred to as "dry" and "wet" testing. In the former, the watch is subjected to air pressure and measurements taken to see whether the case expands as a result of air leaking into the case. If it does, the watch is not water resistant.

    In one type of "wet" testing, the watch is first subjected to air pressure and then submerged in water. If air bubbles come out of the watch when it is underwater, it means air seeped into the watch before it was submerged, and it is therefore not water-resistant. In another type, the watch is placed in a small water-filled chamber, which is then subjected to pressure from a piston. If water gets into the watch, it's not water resistant (this is obviously the riskiest form of water-resistance testing).

    9. Can I wear my water resistant watch in a hot bath?

    No. Exposing your watch to heat, whether it's in a hot bath or sauna can cause the gaskets to lose their shape and their ability to keep out water.

    10. What besides extreme temperatures will jeopardize my watch’s water-resistance?

    Some chemicals can contaminate the gaskets and make it vulnerable. Heavily chlorinated water can cause problems, as can spray-on perfumes and hairsprays that work their way into the watch's seams and damage the gaskets. (They can also damage your watch's finish.)

    11. My divers' watch came with a leather strap. Will the water harm it?

    It may. Wearing a leather strap in the pool or diving is not generally recommended. It's like wearing your shoes to go swimming. Instead, choose a metal, plastic or nylon strap.

    However, some manufacturers do offer leather bands, which have been specially treated to resist water and are guaranteed safe for swimming. Check your warranty before you wear your leather strap in the water

    Water Resistance

    Frequently asked questions.


    1. What makes a watch water-resistant?


    [img]file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Gary/My%20Documents/Water%20Resistance%20in%20a%20Wristwatch_files/Colour-waterproof-tester.jpg[/img]There are several features that help make a watch water-resistant. The most important is the gaskets, or 0 rings-made of rubber, nylon or Teflon which form watertight seals at the joints where the crystal, case back and crown meet the watch case. If the watch is a chronograph, the chronograph pushers will also have gaskets.


    In addition, water-resistant watchcases are lined with a sealant, applied in the form of a quick-hardening liquid, which helps keep water out.

    The thickness and material of the case is also a big factor in determining whether a watch can safely be worn underwater. The case must be sturdy enough to withstand pressure without caving in, general this means a steel or titanium case or a steel case plated with gold, manufacturers say. Solid gold cases can be water resistant provided they are sufficiently thick.

    A screw-in case back, as opposed to one that pushes in, also contributes to a watch's water resistance. A screw-in crown, a feature of many divers' watches, helps prevent water getting into the case through the watch-stem hole. When it is screwed down it forms a watertight seal much like the seal between a jar and its lid.

    2. Why aren't watches ever labelled or described in advertising as "waterproof" even if they can be worn deep-sea diving?

    According to guidelines issued by the Federal Trade Commission, watch marketers are not allowed to label their watches "water-proof." Even watches designed for deep-sea diving cannot claim to be waterproof.

    3. My watch is labelled "water-resistant to 50 meters" but the manufacturer's instructions say I can only wear it swimming, not snorkelling or diving. Why is that?

    The different levels of water resistance as expressed in meters are only theoretical. They refer to the depth at which a watch will keep out water if both watch and the water are perfectly motionless. These conditions, of course, are never met in the real swimmer's or diver's world. In real life, the movement of the wearer's arm through the water increases the pressure on the watch dramatically; so it can't be worn to the depths indicated by lab testing machines.

    4. What are the various levels of water-resistance?

    Watches with the lowest level of water resistance are labelled simply "water-resistant." They can withstand splashes of water but should not be submerged. Above that (or below it, literally speaking), the most common designations are

    -30 meters (1 meter is about 3.3 feet) Not suitable for any immersion in water, but will withstand splashes of water.

    -50 meters, which means the watch, is suitable for surface swimming.

    -100 meters, indicating it can be worn snorkelling.

    -200 meters, suitable for recreational scuba diving.

    -1,000 meters (roughly three-fifths of a mile).

    Watches in this last category can endure deep-sea diving. Their gaskets are made of materials that can withstand the helium used in decompression chambers. Some have valves that let the wearer release the helium that has seeped into the watch so the case won't explode as the watch and diver adjust to normal atmospheric conditions.



    Keep in mind that the depth specified on the watch dial represents the results of tests done in the laboratory, not in the ocean.






    5. I've seen the abbreviation ATM used in labelling degrees of water resistance. What does it mean?

    It stands for "atmosphere" and it's equal to 10 meters of water pressure. Another word for "atmosphere" is "bar," which is often used in Europe.

    6. Is water resistance permanent?

    No. Water resistance depends on several factors, some of which can be affected by wear or simply by time. Gaskets can become contaminated or misshapen, cases distorted or crystals loose or broken. That's why your watch, like your car and your teeth, needs preventive maintenance.

    7. How often does water resistance need to be checked?

    At least once a year. Most manufacturers say water resistance needs to be tested every time the case back is opened, because opening the case can dislodge the gaskets. This rule applies even to a simple battery change. (Many service centres also change the gaskets whenever a watch comes in for service.)

    8. How is water resistance tested?

    There are basically two ways of machine testing water resistance, referred to as "dry" and "wet" testing. In the former, the watch is subjected to air pressure and measurements taken to see whether the case expands as a result of air leaking into the case. If it does, the watch is not water resistant.

    In one type of "wet" testing, the watch is first subjected to air pressure and then submerged in water. If air bubbles come out of the watch when it is underwater, it means air seeped into the watch before it was submerged, and it is therefore not water-resistant. In another type, the watch is placed in a small water-filled chamber, which is then subjected to pressure from a piston. If water gets into the watch, it's not water resistant (this is obviously the riskiest form of water-resistance testing).

    9. Can I wear my water resistant watch in a hot bath?

    No. Exposing your watch to heat, whether it's in a hot bath or sauna can cause the gaskets to lose their shape and their ability to keep out water.

    10. What besides extreme temperatures will jeopardize my watch’s water-resistance?

    Some chemicals can contaminate the gaskets and make it vulnerable. Heavily chlorinated water can cause problems, as can spray-on perfumes and hairsprays that work their way into the watch's seams and damage the gaskets. (They can also damage your watch's finish.)

    11. My divers' watch came with a leather strap. Will the water harm it?

    It may. Wearing a leather strap in the pool or diving is not generally recommended. It's like wearing your shoes to go swimming. Instead, choose a metal, plastic or nylon strap.
    Last edited by SeaHunter; February 13th, 2006 at 06:55.

  8. #7
    Member hoth2o's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Re: Depth rating......

    Sea hunters invisible text revealed:

    Water Resistance

    Frequently asked questions.


    1. What makes a watch water-resistant?

    [img]file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Gary/My%20Documents/Water%20Resistance%20in%20a%20Wristwatch_files/Colour-waterproof-tester.jpg[/img]There are several features that help make a watch water-resistant. The most important is the gaskets, or 0 rings-made of rubber, nylon or Teflon which form watertight seals at the joints where the crystal, case back and crown meet the watch case. If the watch is a chronograph, the chronograph pushers will also have gaskets.


    In addition, water-resistant watchcases are lined with a sealant, applied in the form of a quick-hardening liquid, which helps keep water out.

    The thickness and material of the case is also a big factor in determining whether a watch can safely be worn underwater. The case must be sturdy enough to withstand pressure without caving in, general this means a steel or titanium case or a steel case plated with gold, manufacturers say. Solid gold cases can be water resistant provided they are sufficiently thick.

    A screw-in case back, as opposed to one that pushes in, also contributes to a watch's water resistance. A screw-in crown, a feature of many divers' watches, helps prevent water getting into the case through the watch-stem hole. When it is screwed down it forms a watertight seal much like the seal between a jar and its lid.

    2. Why aren't watches ever labelled or described in advertising as "waterproof" even if they can be worn deep-sea diving?

    According to guidelines issued by the Federal Trade Commission, watch marketers are not allowed to label their watches "water-proof." Even watches designed for deep-sea diving cannot claim to be waterproof.

    3. My watch is labelled "water-resistant to 50 meters" but the manufacturer's instructions say I can only wear it swimming, not snorkelling or diving. Why is that?

    The different levels of water resistance as expressed in meters are only theoretical. They refer to the depth at which a watch will keep out water if both watch and the water are perfectly motionless. These conditions, of course, are never met in the real swimmer's or diver's world. In real life, the movement of the wearer's arm through the water increases the pressure on the watch dramatically; so it can't be worn to the depths indicated by lab testing machines.

    4. What are the various levels of water-resistance?

    Watches with the lowest level of water resistance are labelled simply "water-resistant." They can withstand splashes of water but should not be submerged. Above that (or below it, literally speaking), the most common designations are

    -30 meters (1 meter is about 3.3 feet) Not suitable for any immersion in water, but will withstand splashes of water.

    -50 meters, which means the watch, is suitable for surface swimming.

    -100 meters, indicating it can be worn snorkelling.

    -200 meters, suitable for recreational scuba diving.

    -1,000 meters (roughly three-fifths of a mile).

    Watches in this last category can endure deep-sea diving. Their gaskets are made of materials that can withstand the helium used in decompression chambers. Some have valves that let the wearer release the helium that has seeped into the watch so the case won't explode as the watch and diver adjust to normal atmospheric conditions.



    Keep in mind that the depth specified on the watch dial represents the results of tests done in the laboratory, not in the ocean.



    5. I've seen the abbreviation ATM used in labelling degrees of water resistance. What does it mean?

    It stands for "atmosphere" and it's equal to 10 meters of water pressure. Another word for "atmosphere" is "bar," which is often used in Europe.

    6. Is water resistance permanent?

    No. Water resistance depends on several factors, some of which can be affected by wear or simply by time. Gaskets can become contaminated or misshapen, cases distorted or crystals loose or broken. That's why your watch, like your car and your teeth, needs preventive maintenance.

    7. How often does water resistance need to be checked?

    At least once a year. Most manufacturers say water resistance needs to be tested every time the case back is opened, because opening the case can dislodge the gaskets. This rule applies even to a simple battery change. (Many service centres also change the gaskets whenever a watch comes in for service.)

    8. How is water resistance tested?

    There are basically two ways of machine testing water resistance, referred to as "dry" and "wet" testing. In the former, the watch is subjected to air pressure and measurements taken to see whether the case expands as a result of air leaking into the case. If it does, the watch is not water resistant.

    In one type of "wet" testing, the watch is first subjected to air pressure and then submerged in water. If air bubbles come out of the watch when it is underwater, it means air seeped into the watch before it was submerged, and it is therefore not water-resistant. In another type, the watch is placed in a small water-filled chamber, which is then subjected to pressure from a piston. If water gets into the watch, it's not water resistant (this is obviously the riskiest form of water-resistance testing).

    9. Can I wear my water resistant watch in a hot bath?

    No. Exposing your watch to heat, whether it's in a hot bath or sauna can cause the gaskets to lose their shape and their ability to keep out water.

    10. What besides extreme temperatures will jeopardize my watch’s water-resistance?

    Some chemicals can contaminate the gaskets and make it vulnerable. Heavily chlorinated water can cause problems, as can spray-on perfumes and hairsprays that work their way into the watch's seams and damage the gaskets. (They can also damage your watch's finish.)

    11. My divers' watch came with a leather strap. Will the water harm it?

    It may. Wearing a leather strap in the pool or diving is not generally recommended. It's like wearing your shoes to go swimming. Instead, choose a metal, plastic or nylon strap.

    However, some manufacturers do offer leather bands, which have been specially treated to resist water and are guaranteed safe for swimming. Check your warranty before you wear your leather strap in the water

    Water Resistance

    Frequently asked questions.


    1. What makes a watch water-resistant?

    [img]file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Gary/My%20Documents/Water%20Resistance%20in%20a%20Wristwatch_files/Colour-waterproof-tester.jpg[/img]There are several features that help make a watch water-resistant. The most important is the gaskets, or 0 rings-made of rubber, nylon or Teflon which form watertight seals at the joints where the crystal, case back and crown meet the watch case. If the watch is a chronograph, the chronograph pushers will also have gaskets.


    In addition, water-resistant watchcases are lined with a sealant, applied in the form of a quick-hardening liquid, which helps keep water out.

    The thickness and material of the case is also a big factor in determining whether a watch can safely be worn underwater. The case must be sturdy enough to withstand pressure without caving in, general this means a steel or titanium case or a steel case plated with gold, manufacturers say. Solid gold cases can be water resistant provided they are sufficiently thick.

    A screw-in case back, as opposed to one that pushes in, also contributes to a watch's water resistance. A screw-in crown, a feature of many divers' watches, helps prevent water getting into the case through the watch-stem hole. When it is screwed down it forms a watertight seal much like the seal between a jar and its lid.

    2. Why aren't watches ever labelled or described in advertising as "waterproof" even if they can be worn deep-sea diving?

    According to guidelines issued by the Federal Trade Commission, watch marketers are not allowed to label their watches "water-proof." Even watches designed for deep-sea diving cannot claim to be waterproof.

    3. My watch is labelled "water-resistant to 50 meters" but the manufacturer's instructions say I can only wear it swimming, not snorkelling or diving. Why is that?

    The different levels of water resistance as expressed in meters are only theoretical. They refer to the depth at which a watch will keep out water if both watch and the water are perfectly motionless. These conditions, of course, are never met in the real swimmer's or diver's world. In real life, the movement of the wearer's arm through the water increases the pressure on the watch dramatically; so it can't be worn to the depths indicated by lab testing machines.

    4. What are the various levels of water-resistance?

    Watches with the lowest level of water resistance are labelled simply "water-resistant." They can withstand splashes of water but should not be submerged. Above that (or below it, literally speaking), the most common designations are

    -30 meters (1 meter is about 3.3 feet) Not suitable for any immersion in water, but will withstand splashes of water.

    -50 meters, which means the watch, is suitable for surface swimming.

    -100 meters, indicating it can be worn snorkelling.

    -200 meters, suitable for recreational scuba diving.

    -1,000 meters (roughly three-fifths of a mile).

    Watches in this last category can endure deep-sea diving. Their gaskets are made of materials that can withstand the helium used in decompression chambers. Some have valves that let the wearer release the helium that has seeped into the watch so the case won't explode as the watch and diver adjust to normal atmospheric conditions.



    Keep in mind that the depth specified on the watch dial represents the results of tests done in the laboratory, not in the ocean.



    5. I've seen the abbreviation ATM used in labelling degrees of water resistance. What does it mean?

    It stands for "atmosphere" and it's equal to 10 meters of water pressure. Another word for "atmosphere" is "bar," which is often used in Europe.

    6. Is water resistance permanent?

    No. Water resistance depends on several factors, some of which can be affected by wear or simply by time. Gaskets can become contaminated or misshapen, cases distorted or crystals loose or broken. That's why your watch, like your car and your teeth, needs preventive maintenance.

    7. How often does water resistance need to be checked?

    At least once a year. Most manufacturers say water resistance needs to be tested every time the case back is opened, because opening the case can dislodge the gaskets. This rule applies even to a simple battery change. (Many service centres also change the gaskets whenever a watch comes in for service.)

    8. How is water resistance tested?

    There are basically two ways of machine testing water resistance, referred to as "dry" and "wet" testing. In the former, the watch is subjected to air pressure and measurements taken to see whether the case expands as a result of air leaking into the case. If it does, the watch is not water resistant.

    In one type of "wet" testing, the watch is first subjected to air pressure and then submerged in water. If air bubbles come out of the watch when it is underwater, it means air seeped into the watch before it was submerged, and it is therefore not water-resistant. In another type, the watch is placed in a small water-filled chamber, which is then subjected to pressure from a piston. If water gets into the watch, it's not water resistant (this is obviously the riskiest form of water-resistance testing).

    9. Can I wear my water resistant watch in a hot bath?

    No. Exposing your watch to heat, whether it's in a hot bath or sauna can cause the gaskets to lose their shape and their ability to keep out water.

    10. What besides extreme temperatures will jeopardize my watch’s water-resistance?

    Some chemicals can contaminate the gaskets and make it vulnerable. Heavily chlorinated water can cause problems, as can spray-on perfumes and hairsprays that work their way into the watch's seams and damage the gaskets. (They can also damage your watch's finish.)

    11. My divers' watch came with a leather strap. Will the water harm it?

    It may. Wearing a leather strap in the pool or diving is not generally recommended. It's like wearing your shoes to go swimming. Instead, choose a metal, plastic or nylon strap.

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