New to Doxa. Need some guidance
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Thread: New to Doxa. Need some guidance

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  1. #1
    Member NardinNut's Avatar
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    New to Doxa. Need some guidance

    I知 new to Doxa. I致e known about them for quite some time, but now I知 looking to buy one. I知 trying to decide if I should get the 300 Sharkhunter, 1200 Sharkhunter, or 1200 Caribbean. I don稚 own any blue dial watches so I was thinking the Caribbean at first. Then a switched to the 1200 Sharkhunter as I like the orange hand and seems would be more versatile. Now I知 thinking the 300 Sharkhunter as I like the vintage look and double domed crystal, and likely more collectible, but unsure if the smaller dial size would disappointment me. Now I知 all screwed up and can稚 make a decision!!

    For reference, my wrist is 7.25. And all my dive watches are black dialed. Although subdued. I壇 like some guidance from all of you on which you壇 pick and why.

    Also, is there a coupon code for forum members? I PM壇 Doxa but haven稚 heard back.

    Thanks!
    People who think they know everything are a great annoyance to those of us who do.

  2. #2
    Member adg31's Avatar
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    New to Doxa. Need some guidance

    If it's any help here's my SUB 300 Professional on my 7.5" wrist.
    When you look at the various models which one do you hope isn't out of stock when you decide?
    For me it was the orange dial and lower profile that sold me - still not regretting it :)


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  3. #3
    Member NardinNut's Avatar
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    Re: New to Doxa. Need some guidance

    Quote Originally Posted by adg31 View Post
    When you look at the various models which one do you hope isn't out of stock when you decide?
    For me it was the orange dial and lower profile that sold me - still not regretting it :)
    That would be the Silver Lung :). Alas it痴 sold out. My next pick would be the 300 Searambler. The website says 釘uy it now but when I click on buy it now it takes me to the Silver Lung page, so I知 guessing the 300 Searambler (non silver lung) is no longer available, even tho it doesn稚 say sold out.

    I keep going back to the 300 Sharkhunter just for the fact it is likely more collectible, so I can flip it easier if we don稚 bond.
    People who think they know everything are a great annoyance to those of us who do.

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  5. #4
    Member nepatriot's Avatar
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    Re: New to Doxa. Need some guidance

    Quote Originally Posted by NardinNut View Post
    I’m new to Doxa. I’ve known about them for quite some time, but now I’m looking to buy one. I’m trying to decide if I should get the 300 Sharkhunter, 1200 Sharkhunter, or 1200 Caribbean. I don’t own any blue dial watches so I was thinking the Caribbean at first. Then a switched to the 1200 Sharkhunter as I like the orange hand and seems would be more versatile. Now I’m thinking the 300 Sharkhunter as I like the vintage look and double domed crystal, and likely more collectible, but unsure if the smaller dial size would disappointment me. Now I’m all screwed up and can’t make a decision!!

    For reference, my wrist is 7.25”. And all my dive watches are black dialed. Although subdued. I’d like some guidance from all of you on which you’d pick and why.

    Also, is there a coupon code for forum members? I PM’d Doxa but haven’t heard back.

    Thanks!
    My wrist is about the same circumference as yours. The 300 or 1200 would fit me. I went with the 1200: I wanted the larger dial on the 1200. The 300 is a very cool watch, and doe sit lower. Almost bought one.

    So does that mean they would fit you the same? Nope.

    There's a post just a few down from yours on this very topic. Here's some guidance that has helped me over the years. Learned this 10 - 12 years ago from some very wise people on WUS, as well as from a real live, old-time professional watch seller.

    "Welcome to WUS. Its a great place to learn about a whole world of watches beyond what you can find locally in stores around you. As you have discovered, that creates a problem: how can you gage if a watch that captures your eye will fit you.

    Fortunately, there is an easy answer. All you need are 2 measurements.

    First, forget wrist circumference. If you imagine a cut away view of a wrist, consider wrists of the same circumferance come in all different shapes. A 7" wrist can be wide and flat, more square, or rounded. There are some people with 6.5" wrists that can fit a 52mm Seiko Sumo, while others with 7.5" wrists for whom a Sumo is too big.

    Second, case diameter is useful for aesthetics, and is secondary to how a watch fits on your wrist. You may have, or may develop overtime, a diameter size that you prefer, that you feel looks best on your wrist.

    The net of the 2 points above is that it's incorrect to assume that because one 40mm diameter watch fits another person with a 7", that same watch will fit your 7" wrist. Or if you have a 40mm watch you like that fits your 7" wrist, all 40mm diameter watches fit you the same way.

    The first measurement you need is case length. Some times called "lug to lug" (not to be confused with lug width, the distance between lugs, which is used to determine the size strap or bracelet).

    The second measurement is the length across the flat area on top of your wrist, in mm, where a watch sits (just up the arm above the wrist bone), between where your wrist starts to curve down on each side. This is not the maximum width of your wrist, but the flat area on top.

    Now, compare your measurement above to any watch's case length. If the watch case length is =/< than your flat area measurement on top of your wrist, the watch is a good candidate for your wrist.

    If >, then it may be a candidate, but you need to consider a few other factors: the lug curvature, and how flat the case back is. A watch case with deeply curved lugs, that can hug the wrist, where your wrist starts to curve down, can give you an extra mm or so. A protruding case back, where the case back is more like an saucer, and extending past the lug tips, can lift the watch off the wrist, creating instability.

    If all 4 lug tips are suspended in air, the case length is too long for the wrist.

    The key to fit is stability. Ideally, the case should maintain contact with your wrist, all the way to the lug tips. A watch with a flat case back allows the watch to "sit down" on your wrist, and can provide stability, even in the lug tips on one side are not in contact with your wrist all the way out to the tips.

    An unstable watch will tend to flop around from side to side as you walk. It will tend to slide down your wrist, over the wrist bone, and on to your hand, where the crown might dig in. To compensate, wearers will often over tighten the strap or bracelet, which will become uncomfortable as the wrist swells or contracts due to temperature and humidity.

    A clear sign that a watch is too big for the wearer is when they say it's "top heavy".

    I had a Seiko MM300, 14.5mm in height, with a heavy one-piece thick SS case. It never felt top heavy for me. Rubber or SS. Even though the lug tips on one side were suspended, and the watch case was to large for me, the case back was flat and the watch sat low. It was stable.

    Before a professional watch salesman, also a certified watch maker, at a very high end, old and well established watch store, taught me this, my internet watch purchase success rate was very poor. Once I started using this simple process, my fit rate has been near 100%.

    My wrist is just over 7 1/4" in circumference. More square, as tall as they are wide, with more rounded sides. The flat area across the top is just under 47mm. A 48.5mm Squale 1521 fits like a glove, while a 47mm Seiko SRP Turtle's shallow curved cushion case is too big. A 45mm Seiko SKX is as big as I can go in that style case. My 47mm Damasko DA46 fits perfectly. My 47mm Seiko Monster was a little too big.

    A Doxa 1200 is the largest I can go in a Doxa style tonneau case; fits perfectly. The 1500 is too big.

    Hope this is of some help, and good luck!"
    adg31 and marcoscova like this.

  6. #5
    Member adg31's Avatar
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    Re: New to Doxa. Need some guidance

    That's strange - it may be worth giving them a call in case it's a glitch on the website.
    The SilverLung is a beauty but I couldn't justify it on top of my SUB 300 Searambler!


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  7. #6
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    Re: New to Doxa. Need some guidance

    Quote Originally Posted by nepatriot View Post
    My wrist is about the same circumference as yours. The 300 or 1200 would fit me. I went with the 1200: I wanted the larger dial on the 1200. The 300 is a very cool watch, and doe sit lower. Almost bought one.

    So does that mean they would fit you the same? Nope.

    There's a post just a few down from yours on this very topic. Here's some guidance that has helped me over the years. Learned this 10 - 12 years ago from some very wise people on WUS, as well as from a real live, old-time professional watch seller.

    "Welcome to WUS. Its a great place to learn about a whole world of watches beyond what you can find locally in stores around you. As you have discovered, that creates a problem: how can you gage if a watch that captures your eye will fit you.

    Fortunately, there is an easy answer. All you need are 2 measurements.

    First, forget wrist circumference. If you imagine a cut away view of a wrist, consider wrists of the same circumferance come in all different shapes. A 7" wrist can be wide and flat, more square, or rounded. There are some people with 6.5" wrists that can fit a 52mm Seiko Sumo, while others with 7.5" wrists for whom a Sumo is too big.

    Second, case diameter is useful for aesthetics, and is secondary to how a watch fits on your wrist. You may have, or may develop overtime, a diameter size that you prefer, that you feel looks best on your wrist.

    The net of the 2 points above is that it's incorrect to assume that because one 40mm diameter watch fits another person with a 7", that same watch will fit your 7" wrist. Or if you have a 40mm watch you like that fits your 7" wrist, all 40mm diameter watches fit you the same way.

    The first measurement you need is case length. Some times called "lug to lug" (not to be confused with lug width, the distance between lugs, which is used to determine the size strap or bracelet).

    The second measurement is the length across the flat area on top of your wrist, in mm, where a watch sits (just up the arm above the wrist bone), between where your wrist starts to curve down on each side. This is not the maximum width of your wrist, but the flat area on top.

    Now, compare your measurement above to any watch's case length. If the watch case length is =/< than your flat area measurement on top of your wrist, the watch is a good candidate for your wrist.

    If >, then it may be a candidate, but you need to consider a few other factors: the lug curvature, and how flat the case back is. A watch case with deeply curved lugs, that can hug the wrist, where your wrist starts to curve down, can give you an extra mm or so. A protruding case back, where the case back is more like an saucer, and extending past the lug tips, can lift the watch off the wrist, creating instability.

    If all 4 lug tips are suspended in air, the case length is too long for the wrist.

    The key to fit is stability. Ideally, the case should maintain contact with your wrist, all the way to the lug tips. A watch with a flat case back allows the watch to "sit down" on your wrist, and can provide stability, even in the lug tips on one side are not in contact with your wrist all the way out to the tips.

    An unstable watch will tend to flop around from side to side as you walk. It will tend to slide down your wrist, over the wrist bone, and on to your hand, where the crown might dig in. To compensate, wearers will often over tighten the strap or bracelet, which will become uncomfortable as the wrist swells or contracts due to temperature and humidity.

    A clear sign that a watch is too big for the wearer is when they say it's "top heavy".

    I had a Seiko MM300, 14.5mm in height, with a heavy one-piece thick SS case. It never felt top heavy for me. Rubber or SS. Even though the lug tips on one side were suspended, and the watch case was to large for me, the case back was flat and the watch sat low. It was stable.

    Before a professional watch salesman, also a certified watch maker, at a very high end, old and well established watch store, taught me this, my internet watch purchase success rate was very poor. Once I started using this simple process, my fit rate has been near 100%.

    My wrist is just over 7 1/4" in circumference. More square, as tall as they are wide, with more rounded sides. The flat area across the top is just under 47mm. A 48.5mm Squale 1521 fits like a glove, while a 47mm Seiko SRP Turtle's shallow curved cushion case is too big. A 45mm Seiko SKX is as big as I can go in that style case. My 47mm Damasko DA46 fits perfectly. My 47mm Seiko Monster was a little too big.

    A Doxa 1200 is the largest I can go in a Doxa style tonneau case; fits perfectly. The 1500 is too big.

    Hope this is of some help, and good luck!"
    Good call, my SUB 300 fits perfectly but the Omega Seamaster 300 was unfortunately just too long for my wrist.
    The other thing to consider is the height of the watch, especially if you need it to fit under a shirt cuff.
    It can also help to try on a few watches of similar size - even if not the same brand - if you can.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #7
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    My vote goes to the 300 searambler, the profile is thin so it will fit under a cuff, even though they are sold out, they pop up on wus quite often. I know because only 2 weeks ago I missed one by a few days, then only last week another popped up!

  9. #8
    Member NardinNut's Avatar
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    Re: New to Doxa. Need some guidance

    Thanks for all the insight. Just to clarify, the actual size of the watch doesn稚 matter. I have 38mm all the way to 47mm watches. At 42mm, I have no doubt they値l all be a great fit. Just put wrist size for reference.

    I think what I知 trying to determine is the style and versatility between the models. For example, the 1200 Sharkhunter is obviously very versatile but that痴 because it has a black dial, much like my other divers (or watches for that matter). Because of the abundance of black dial in my collection, I think I知 going to scratch the 1200 Sharkhunter off the list. However, the 300 Sharkhunter is very appealing for it痴 vintage, and collectible, attributes. The 1200 Caribbean is appealing for the blue dial (I don稚 own a blue dial watch) and the dial size.
    People who think they know everything are a great annoyance to those of us who do.

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