Regulating the watch

Thread: Regulating the watch

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  1. #1
    Member SSeric02's Avatar
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    Regulating the watch

    I've always had a thing for automatics, I suppose just the interest and attraction to all things mechanical. But, I've never really paid much attention to how accurate or how well the watches kept time...until now.

    I've been checking my SUB 1000T each day against the Windows clock on my computer here at work. Is this a good constant to measure against? Is there a website that accurately tracks GMT or the atomic clock? What does everyone use?

    Also, is there a special procedure you guys follow to measure the watches accuracy or to keep it on track? For instance, I wear the watch during the day, take it off at night, and put it back on after my shower in the morning. When I'm at my computer at work, I check the watch against the computer's clock, nothing special.

    Looking forward to more information on this.

    Thanks,
    Eric
    Remember the night is for hunting, and forget not the day is for sleep. - Rudyard Kipling

  2. #2

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    Re: Regulating the watch

    Quote Originally Posted by SSeric02 View Post
    <snip>
    Is there a website that accurately tracks GMT or the atomic clock? What does everyone use?
    <snip>
    Eric, I use www.time.gov.

    --Keith

  3. #3
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    Re: Regulating the watch

    If your watch comes with an cosc certificate, it'll tell you what position your watch would gain or loses time. This information is useful as say on the wrist you find it loses time so when you can take watch off, you should place it in a position that would gain time - perhaps face up.

    Different mechanical watches react differently to different position, even 2 of the same model hence each is an individual with their own soul...

    If your watch doesn't come with the cosc certificate then you can still determine what it does by trial and error - takes longer and is part of the fun of owning mechanical watches.

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  5. #4
    Member SSeric02's Avatar
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    Re: Regulating the watch

    Quote Originally Posted by Caribbean Soul View Post
    Eric, I use www.time.gov.

    --Keith

    Thanks Keith!

    I also found this site in my searching: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/

    I checked it's time to time.gov and they are on second for second; timeanddate.com just offers times for all world time zones for those not in the USA.

    Joukowski- no COSC here, just the plain 1000T. I reset it with the above website (the computer clock is off from both) and will just start recording times and accuracy each day. Cool.
    Remember the night is for hunting, and forget not the day is for sleep. - Rudyard Kipling

  6. #5
    Administrator CMSgt Bo's Avatar
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    Re: Regulating the watch

    Quote Originally Posted by Joukowski View Post
    If your watch doesn't come with the cosc certificate then you can still determine what it does by trial and error - takes longer and is part of the fun of owning mechanical watches.
    Yeah, what Joukowski said. Here's what I do (lifted from Chronocentric.com):

    My mechanical or automatic watch is off a few seconds per day, how can I get better accuracy?

    Keep in mind that because of gravity, a mechanical watch runs a little differently in different positions. Also remember that each time you open a diver's watch or other watch with water-resistance, you have to have the whole thing pressure tested again to make sure the water-resistant seals were put back right. So it is best to avoid unnecessary opening of the case to have a watchmaker regulate the watch!

    If your watch is a Chronometer and is off by over 10 seconds per day, it may be is worth having a watchmaker adjust it. But if your watch is only off by a few seconds per day, try the following method of compensating for it.

    Before you go to bed, check the accuracy of your watch against a reliable time source. Write the information down, then place your watch on the nightstand and go to sleep. When you wake up, measure the accuracy again, write it down, and put the watch on. For the next several days, keep doing the same thing except put the watch in a different position each night. Try face up, face down, crown up, crown down, 12 o'clock high, and 6 o'clock high.

    After you have tried all the positions, you will have a list showing exactly how much your watch gets off during the day AND how much it gains or loses in each possible position at night. Find the position to keep it at night that does the most to cancel out the variation the watch experiences during the day.

    For example: If your watch loses 5 seconds while being worn during the day, try to find a position in which the watch gains about 5 seconds overnight. That way, by simply knowing which position to put your watch in on the nightstand while you sleep--you may be able to cancel out the daily variations and have a very accurate watch!

  7. #6
    Member SSeric02's Avatar
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    Re: Regulating the watch

    Thanks SMSgt Bo. As of right now, the watch has gained about 2 1/2 seconds since I reset it about three hours ago.
    Remember the night is for hunting, and forget not the day is for sleep. - Rudyard Kipling

  8. #7
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    Re: Regulating the watch

    Two great websites to track time:

    www.timeticker.com

    www.time.gov
    whaler

    Doxa Sub 750T Sharkhunter
    Doxa Sub 750T Searambler



  9. #8
    Member twostirish222's Avatar
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    Re: Regulating the watch

    I have a spread sheet that was sent to me from some one on TZ to measure time deviations. i never did use it nor do i know how to. so if some one would like this send me an e-mail and i will send this to you.

    my screen name is my e-mail just add @gmail.com

    take care
    Thanks Nick

  10. #9
    Member T Bone's Avatar
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    Re: Regulating the watch

    I use Time.gov here too. Tied to the USNO, and it's the "official" US time. I used GMT and converted when I was overseas, but a month before I went to Iraq, I used the timeanddate.com site you reference. Great resource, and it is where I learned that DST was in fact used in Iraq too, but with different dates (for a month, we were a 7 hour time difference as opposed to the normal 8).

    I am just completing a timing test (Static this time) of all my Doxa's, and will post the results. The points above are quite pertinent, and planned to make mention of them in the post. (SMSgt Bo, with your permission, I will lift from you what you lifted from Chroncentric.com ).
    Regards, T Bone.

    ______________________
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    DOXA Forum and Sales Corner Moderator

  11. #10
    Administrator CMSgt Bo's Avatar
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    Re: Regulating the watch

    Quote Originally Posted by T Bone View Post
    SMSgt Bo, with your permission, I will lift from you what you lifted from Chroncentric.com
    Sure T, but I don't know how ethical that'll be.

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