Durability of Smart Watches
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  1. #1
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    Durability of Smart Watches

    Hello all, I have a question. I see a lot of manufacturers getting into the "smart watch" game but I have been hesitant to get one. We travel a lot and wherever we go, we tend to do activities that may put a delicate watch in danger. Hiking in the rainforest, glacier hikes and so forth, that kind of activity. (As long as the body holds up, I'm going to keep doing it).

    Needless to say, my watches get banged up. For travel currently, I wear a Casio G-Shock MTG-1000 but there are times where it's a bit too large and clunky.

    Are current smart watches durable enough to withstand a serious impact? Last thing I want is to have it break after some event where my regular watch would keep ticking along.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member Alex_TA's Avatar
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    Re: Durability of Smart Watches

    Do you have internet connection on glacier or in the rain forest? If not, there is no sense in a smart watch.


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  3. #3
    Member mharris660's Avatar
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    Re: Durability of Smart Watches

    hahahahahaha, not mine because I would never own one of the stupid things

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    Member EnderW's Avatar
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    Re: Durability of Smart Watches

    I'm not sure if traditional sense of durability applies here.

    When I'm away at a beach for a week, or taking a 3 day hike, or going fishing for few days with just camping gear.... with traditional watches it's about about shock resistance or water and temperature resistance. But with a smart-watch... the questions are 1) is there a place to charge battery and 2) is there an internet signal or iphone connection to even keep it synched?
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  6. #5
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    Re: Durability of Smart Watches

    Any smart watch would have a maximum life expectancy of 2-3 years beacuse by that time there will be new software not compatible withbyour watch and new technologies in hardware that will make you wanna upgrade.
    Unlike regular watches which can last for generations.
    I have a guess watch that I bought 17 years ago and still working fine. Never serviced. Just changing battery.
    I am mentioning the guess example because it is a cheap watch and till now I am using it.

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  7. #6
    Moderator Public Forum John MS's Avatar
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    Re: Durability of Smart Watches

    It's important to actually look at how a watch is constructed and consider the activities it was designed to perform before using it in potentially risky activities. For example I wouldn't take a dressy IWC Portofino scuba diving because it is clearly not designed for the task. Just as Smart Watches are clearly not substitute G Shocks to be used in strenuous outdoor activities. With a prominent screen and relatively short charge-life they are obviously designed to tell time while also allowing communications access through a touch screen interface.

  8. #7
    Member kramer5150's Avatar
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    Re: Durability of Smart Watches

    As a scout coordinator for my local troop, I have smacked around my moto360 pretty good over the years. Nothing serious mind you like a hard fall or serious water submersion. For the longest time I used it with a glass screen protector which was getting scratched up so I took it off. I will replace it soon. Just the other day I brushed out all the case scratches with a green scotch-brite pad. I did not like the mirror polish anyways. It feels a lot like wearing a timex weekender but sized up a bit to 46mm. I have no complaints at all about the hardware... the Android Wear OS on the other hand has not been good to me, to put it very very kindly.

    I am happy with the moto, but in all honesty I can not recommend any smart watch that uses Android wear. Its by far the most volatile operating system I own, as a user of both iOS and Android in various devices. As a tech-geek at heart, I am tolerant of this volatility... but quite simply I can't openly recommend AW. There are quite a few high $$$ watch makers getting into the Android Wear eco-system. Don't let the branding fool you, its still Android Wear beneath ticking away the bits and bytes of data.

    My next upgrade will probably be a Garmin Foretrex. I need something with a better / dedicated GPS, compass, altimeter and standard batteries is a nice bonus.

    If you are into serious adventure and want to try a smart watch... get one more specifically designed for that.... Garmin, Fitbit. You can buy rugged impact cases for apple watches and some of the fitbit models. I normally would recommend a Casio fore-trek, but like my moto it uses Android Wear.

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    Last edited by kramer5150; December 22nd, 2017 at 21:20.
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  9. #8
    Member kramer5150's Avatar
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    Re: Durability of Smart Watches

    Quote Originally Posted by Mooda View Post
    Any smart watch would have a maximum life expectancy of 2-3 years beacuse by that time there will be new software not compatible withbyour watch and new technologies in hardware that will make you wanna upgrade.
    Unlike regular watches which can last for generations.
    I have a guess watch that I bought 17 years ago and still working fine. Never serviced. Just changing battery.
    I am mentioning the guess example because it is a cheap watch and till now I am using it.

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
    Agree with this. My moto will be 2 years old to me in March 18. It still works fine, but its older generation snapdragon chip is showing signs of slowing down. It gets a bit laggy every once in a while. Still works fine, I just need to be more patient every once in a while.

    those old guess watches were made by Timex... IIRC. I had one for a long time too.

  10. #9
    Member trott3r's Avatar
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    Re: Durability of Smart Watches

    My pebble time steel has gorilla glass and had some scraps at work.
    Shame $h1tbit bought them out
    Davosa,Omega speedy reduced, Seiko(6) ,Orient (3),Citizen (3) GShocks(8), Pebble Time smartwatches (2) are my poison on a Skinny 5 and 3/4 inch wrist

  11. #10
    Member kramer5150's Avatar
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    Re: Durability of Smart Watches

    That brings up another really good point... When you buy a smart watch you are purchasing really 3 things: Hardware, Operating system, Support of the parent company.

    Companies like pebble, Vector and I think ticwatch and perhaps others too, rely heavily on crowd funding for the initial start-up. Once the funding dies, how sustainable are they? Are they generating sufficient revenue to stay afloat and support the eco-system as a whole? How immune are they to being sold, bought out and is the buying company willing to support the product and operating system?

    The hardware is pretty standard... Lithium based battery around 350~450mah, OLED or IPS displays, gorilla glass capacitive touch screens, stainless or thermo-plastic case, strap materials of leather, polyurethane or silicone. Its the OS and support that varies greatly.

    Cellular connectivity or not is one variable to you'll have to decide though.
    Last edited by kramer5150; December 23rd, 2017 at 22:34.
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