Getting started
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  1. #1
    Member hseldon's Avatar
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    May 2015
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    Getting started

    Hello,
    Iíve been collecting Soviet/Russian watches for a few years now and have been thinking it is time to start to get to know my watches a little better. As long as Iíve had this hobby Iíve wanted to know something about the service or repair of the movements, so here goes.

    I have read some of the thread on getting started with advice re tools and have been picking up a few things to start a bit of tinkering soon.
    At this stage I am thinking attempting to fully dismantle a movement is probably foolish so I would be grateful for any tips on jobs I could attempt to get started.

    I have a couple of old Raketa 2609 NAs on their way to me and I was thinking the first thing I will do is practice removing and re setting the hands.

    As for tools, the only thing I have spent any significant money on is a pair of Dumont #2 tweezers and some A+F screwdrivers. Everything else so far is in the cheap and cheerful bracket so far.
    I also have, tools wise
    Movement holder
    Parts tray
    Hand removing levers
    Hand setting tool
    Dial protector
    Caseback openers
    Loupes

    Are there any other tools I should be acquiring? Do I need more than one kind of tweezers at this stage?

    At this stage Iím not interested in anything for the cleaning or oiling as it will be some time before I am skilled enough. Right now I aim to be able to dismantle and then re build a movement, however long this my take.

    Any advice gratefully received.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Member Odessa200's Avatar
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    Apr 2019
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    529
    Quote Originally Posted by hseldon View Post
    Hello,
    I’ve been collecting Soviet/Russian watches for a few years now and have been thinking it is time to start to get to know my watches a little better. As long as I’ve had this hobby I’ve wanted to know something about the service or repair of the movements, so here goes.

    I have read some of the thread on getting started with advice re tools and have been picking up a few things to start a bit of tinkering soon.
    At this stage I am thinking attempting to fully dismantle a movement is probably foolish so I would be grateful for any tips on jobs I could attempt to get started.

    I have a couple of old Raketa 2609 NAs on their way to me and I was thinking the first thing I will do is practice removing and re setting the hands.

    As for tools, the only thing I have spent any significant money on is a pair of Dumont #2 tweezers and some A+F screwdrivers. Everything else so far is in the cheap and cheerful bracket so far.
    I also have, tools wise
    Movement holder
    Parts tray
    Hand removing levers
    Hand setting tool
    Dial protector
    Caseback openers
    Loupes

    Are there any other tools I should be acquiring? Do I need more than one kind of tweezers at this stage?

    At this stage I’m not interested in anything for the cleaning or oiling as it will be some time before I am skilled enough. Right now I aim to be able to dismantle and then re build a movement, however long this my take.

    Any advice gratefully received.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Welcome to this new stage of your hobby. Sometime back I did exactly same: fixing my soviet watches. What you got is all you need. I would advice once you disassemble a movement you wash before putting it back. You can start very simple: get Zippo lighting fluid. This is a purified gasoline that dries w/o much residue. It is plenty good for washing simple soviet movements. Why to wash? When you disassemble a movement some dirt will get lose and shifted from ‘safe places’ that did not impact watch work to a more critical spots. I assume you want the watch to start running after your put it together to know that you got it back right. Washing will help.

    As far as tools, the only other thing I highly recommend is a microscope. At least for me it made a huge difference. I had broken quite a few pivots because even with a magnifying glasses and vizor I could not clearly see what I was doing. Being able to observe the movement under a stereo microphone totally changed it for me. Now, that I have some experience I can do more things w/o it. But at the beginning it was super useful! Good luck.

    And get a lot or two of broken soviet movements to be used as donors.
    Last edited by Odessa200; 3 Weeks Ago at 15:55.
    hseldon likes this.

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