Stowa Seatime rebuild...

Thread: Stowa Seatime rebuild...

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  1. #1
    Member JohnF's Avatar
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    Stowa Seatime rebuild...

    Hi -

    Well, I've started - gulp - my first rebuild project. It's a vintage Stowa Seatime that I want to give my wife when it's working again.

    I bought on eBay and the seller was/is a b*stard. But that's old now and I'm trying to make the best of it.

    The face is in great shape, even though the lume is weak. The hands turn in only one direction, which makes me think that there is a gearage problem. There is also no transmission of power from the mainspring to the balance.

    Caliber is the classic PUW 1560.

    Here are my questions.

    1) does anyone know of any schematics for the PUW 1560 (explosion drawings with oiling points, like ETA publishes)?

    2) does anyone have a source for PUW 1560 parts, commercially?

    3) does anyone have a source for PUW 1560s as ebauche, i.e. the movement alone? Just in case I can't fix it, of course.

    4) the second hand is broken and twisted. I haven't been able to find out exactly the hand dimensions to see what size hands I need. I don't want to replace the minute and hour hands (just relume them), but I do want to replace the seconds hand. I imagine that I can figure out the size from PUW 1560 specifications, but I haven't been able to easily find these on the web.

    And yes, I've been to Dashto, but he doesn't have any 1560s. 1561, yes, but no 1560s...

    Any help appreciated!

    JohnF
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  2. #2

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    Re: Stowa Seatime rebuild...

    Not one of the easiest tasks you´ve chosen! I suppose without the backup of a willing watchmaker it´ll be very difficult to source the spareparts.
    The least big problem would be the seconds hand. You´ll have to get a gauge for pinion sizes (Bergeon). Once you know the size it´s easy to order spare hands (at Ofrei for instance).
    Good luck!

  3. #3
    Member JohnF's Avatar
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    Re: Stowa Seatime rebuild...

    Hi -

    Actually, I do have the support of the watchmaker from whom I took the watchmaker course, he's offered to help with any sort of this kind of specialty problem. But it's up to me to actually take the thing apart and figure out what is wrong.

    And it might be simpler just to put a new movement in...but that'd be close to cheating.

    Will check Ofrei, hadn't thought of them...

    JohnF
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  5. #4

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    Re: Stowa Seatime rebuild...

    Hi John,

    Of course, it would be easier to buy a replacement movement, however the finished product will not have the same value to you. I am also beginning to learn how to fix watch movements and it is not easy, but I am sure with the help of our friends on the forum we will reach our goal. My father used to say about sailing, " it is not about where we are going, it's about how we get there"

    Kane

  6. #5
    Member JohnF's Avatar
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    Re: Stowa Seatime rebuild...

    Hi -

    Exactly. It's not so much simply getting a watch for the wife, it's much more making something for her that no one else will have (ok, except for watchmakers' wives).

    My wife comes from what we in Germany call "einfache Verhältnisse", she was the second youngest of 9 kids with the father working as a unskilled laborer. She grew up expecting men to be able to fix everything and do everything, from wallpapering to plumbing to installing new electrical sockets etc.

    Me, I've been there and done that, but I work 50-60 hour weeks as an economist and really have no interest in fixing things around the house, putting a new coat of paint on the lawn furniture, etc. So I farm these kind of things out, and it's been a bone of contention, since she thinks we waste money on having people do things like that. I see it, of course as an economist, as comparative labor advantages (I'm gonna spend three times as long painting a room as a professional painter, and my marginal leisure cost is much higher than what he is earning...). Put in a new lightbulb? Ok, but spending three hours on a ladder putting in a new light fixture? Nope.

    So getting this sort of thing up and running will add to the domestic tranquility, since nobody she knows can do this.

    On the downside, she may well tell all of her friends and they'll want me to look at their watches as well. Guess I'll deal with that when it comes along...

    JohnF
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  7. #6
    Member JohnF's Avatar
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    Re: Stowa Seatime rebuild...

    So, the saga continues.

    When I pulled the component tray out of its box a few minutes ago and turned the watch out, it started running!

    Hooray, at least the mainspring isn't dead! That's a relief, to put it mildly. The watch has a nice solid beat to it. Workhorse.

    The first picture is of course the movement with the rotor still attached.

    The second picture shows the screw next to the hub of the rotor which is the first screw to be undone.

    The fourth picture shows what it looks like under the rotor after I've unscrewed the retaining screw next to the hub of the rotor and carefully pried off the rotor itself.

    The fifth picture shows the automatic gear winding train.

    Basically the gear on the lower side of the rotor engages the small gear directly at 9 o'clock off the central hub. This turns the two gears directly to touching this small gear. There's play here as the upper plate has a jeweled pivot that holds these two in the right place to provide momentum to the mainspring.

    Picture 6 shows a magnified view of this gear train. The wheels look alike, but are differentiated enough for me to figure out which one goes where...

    Picture 7 shows the watch with this gear train now removed. Pretty dirty, ain't it?

    Picture 8 shows the inside of the rotor. What looks rusted is really brass and quite clean.

    Picture 9 shows the wheels of the automatic gear train in repose, waiting for cleaning.

    Well, that's it for tonight. The next step involved removing the small screws next to the hub before I can access the actual watch works. Given that the mainspring has energy and when I remove this plate the seconds gear will lose its top bearing, I'm going to let the watch run down naturally before attempting any further work.

    Which will be Thursday at the earliest and more likely this weekend, since I've got three hours of weight training and sauna planned for tomorrow evening.

    And nope, I don't have any schematics or anything like that. I'm just winging it and taking it nice and slow and hope and pray that I can put everything back together.

    Which is why I'm taking lots of pictures.

    JohnF
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  8. #7

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    Re: Stowa Seatime rebuild...

    WOW that's a lot of work with pictures and posting!! Is the topmost gear in pict 6 missing teeth or is that dirt? Hope you continue this photo post to the end so I can use the pictures for guidance on my own project.


    Kane

  9. #8
    Member JohnF's Avatar
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    Re: Stowa Seatime rebuild...

    Hi-

    It's dirty.

    Will continue when I have time. Watch is packed away now and resting after all that exertion.

    I have to get some stuff to clean and relubricate the watch, as well as a new crystal before much else. Also new lume...

    And a hands puller, and a new seconds hand, and and and...
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    Re: Stowa Seatime rebuild...

    Great job, John! Be sure to take a lot of photos and don´t tell anyone if you succeed. I did, guess what happened...

  11. #10
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    Re: Stowa Seatime rebuild...

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnF
    So, the saga continues.

    Well, that's it for tonight. The next step involved removing the small screws next to the hub before I can access the actual watch works. Given that the mainspring has energy and when I remove this plate the seconds gear will lose its top bearing, I'm going to let the watch run down naturally before attempting any further work.
    Even if you let it wind down on it's own naturally, I'd still find the click and let the mainspring down before further disassembly. I've been told that if you don't, you should at least block the escape wheel when removing the pallet to eliminate risk to the pallet jewels.

    Which will be Thursday at the earliest and more likely this weekend, since I've got three hours of weight training and sauna planned for tomorrow evening.

    And nope, I don't have any schematics or anything like that. I'm just winging it and taking it nice and slow and hope and pray that I can put everything back together.

    Which is why I'm taking lots of pictures.

    JohnF
    I don't know if I could have learned to service a watch without a digital camera. I can usually do without one now on the time-only section, but I still get confused about calendar bits (and occasionally an unfamiliar auto-wind) without lots of pictures. Since it's there anyway, and once you forgot which way something goes it's too late, might as well take a picture after every major piece comes off.

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