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  1. #21
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    Re: Article on what makes viruses virulent

    Duplicate.

  2. #22
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    Re: Article on what makes viruses virulent

    As someone mentioned, healthcare supplies in the US are finite. In NY, doctors are wearing trash bags now because their supplies are gone (even though corporations just got their 2 trillion stimulus bill). It's sad that this nation doesn't value health. Louisiana's going to be the next state hard hit, and that's one of the poorest states in the US, it's going to be a bloodbath. Willingly exposing the nation to the pathogen will decimate a fragile healthcare system, putting every state (even our wealthiest eg CA) at an unbearable load for healthcare workers. CA's practicing quarantine, if they didn't it would be a slaughter. We've seen people of all ages die. The pundits who're calling for people to go back to work, will never have to expose themselves to the pathogen -- cheap talk for them, they're cowards willing to throw anyone to the wolves to see their portfolio enriched.
    gangrel and xevious like this.
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  3. #23
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    Re: Article on what makes viruses virulent

    Quote Originally Posted by mercurynfo View Post
    All I ask, is that you consider all the thousands, perhaps millions in or about to be standing in unemployment lines in the coming weeks and months. For those who have the luxury of having emergency savings and can pay their bills with additional margin, it's all seems to be about shelter in place and lock down of the as much of the economy as possible. Where it makes sense, sure, but where safe protocols can be put in place, allow folks to work safely. Not everyone can telework.
    Oh, I get that. It will be hell for many, and government wheels grind very slowly. There will be many local businesses that won't survive, too, and that's going to hurt.

    But, recognize that:
    a) there aren't that many places where intermediate protocols can be implemented, or perhaps better to say, not that many people will be affected.

    b) beware corporate greed. Elon Musk kept Tesla open for several days despite a stay-at-home because he didn't believe in that approach. Several companies have asserted they are "essential" and therefore do not need to close. Michael's? Joann Fabrics? I don't see anything "essential" about them.

    If you try relaxing a little, then where it can work, it won't help...and you'll make it harder to curtail abuses by businesses only caring about the bottom line.

    You can also see it by looking at case numbers over time, in places like New Mexico and Arizona. The New Mexico governer ordered a fairly tight crackdown early...we're seeing case numbers rise, but they're still low...around 110, IIRC right now. Arizona has a patchwork approach. In the last 8-9 days since the NBA basically acted as the first domino (for us here)...they've gone over 400, and the count's growing fast.

    Probably the biggest problem is, as you've said...nowhere NEAR enough tests. Can any place truly say that lesser protocols can safely be implemented?

    I will admit to a core, pessimistic, doom&gloom streak in me that's rather wide. But...privately? I don't think we come back from this. At best, I think it's going to be several years before we do. The economic damage is likely, in my mind, to lead to splintering levels of social unrest and upheaval, and the recovery will be marred by factionalism and violence...perhaps even triggering the class war. So, yes, I recognize that this lockdown will be very, very, VERY bad. But I think trying to maintain something like "business as usual" will be much, much worse.

    EDIT: I forgot to add one thing about the social unrest. Some *@(#$& (&@#$ &(@#$ whackjob was planning to use a truck bomb against a hospital because, IIRC, he didn't like the government's handling of this crisis. He was met by the FBI as he tried to pick it up, fortunately, and died in the ensuing gun battle. There will be more before the summer is over, I am afraid, from the various stresses that are being piled onto everyone.
    Last edited by gangrel; 1 Week Ago at 04:27.
    The truth is rarely pure and never simple.

    Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest

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  5. #24
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    Re: Article on what makes viruses virulent

    Quote Originally Posted by gangrel View Post
    Oh, I get that. It will be hell for many, and government wheels grind very slowly. There will be many local businesses that won't survive, too, and that's going to hurt.

    But, recognize that:
    a) there aren't that many places where intermediate protocols can be implemented, or perhaps better to say, not that many people will be affected.

    b) beware corporate greed. Elon Musk kept Tesla open for several days despite a stay-at-home because he didn't believe in that approach. Several companies have asserted they are "essential" and therefore do not need to close. Michael's? Joann Fabrics? I don't see anything "essential" about them.

    If you try relaxing a little, then where it can work, it won't help...and you'll make it harder to curtail abuses by businesses only caring about the bottom line.

    You can also see it by looking at case numbers over time, in places like New Mexico and Arizona. The New Mexico governer ordered a fairly tight crackdown early...we're seeing case numbers rise, but they're still low...around 110, IIRC right now. Arizona has a patchwork approach. In the last 8-9 days since the NBA basically acted as the first domino (for us here)...they've gone over 400, and the count's growing fast.

    Probably the biggest problem is, as you've said...nowhere NEAR enough tests. Can any place truly say that lesser protocols can safely be implemented?

    I will admit to a core, pessimistic, doom&gloom streak in me that's rather wide. But...privately? I don't think we come back from this. At best, I think it's going to be several years before we do. The economic damage is likely, in my mind, to lead to splintering levels of social unrest and upheaval, and the recovery will be marred by factionalism and violence...perhaps even triggering the class war. So, yes, I recognize that this lockdown will be very, very, VERY bad. But I think trying to maintain something like "business as usual" will be much, much worse.

    EDIT: I forgot to add one thing about the social unrest. Some *@(#$& (&@#$ &(@#$ whackjob was planning to use a truck bomb against a hospital because, IIRC, he didn't like the government's handling of this crisis. He was met by the FBI as he tried to pick it up, fortunately, and died in the ensuing gun battle. There will be more before the summer is over, I am afraid, from the various stresses that are being piled onto everyone.
    A year from now, you are either going to look very foolish or like Nostradamus.

    Consider me your alter ego. A year from now, we’ll see precisely the carnage that SARSCov-2 will wreak on the world. My bet is on American grit, resourcefulness, and innovation to proliferate testing, perfecting treatment and fielding a proven vaccine. Let’s hold off til Mar 2021; until then hunker down and stay safe.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  6. #25
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    Re: Article on what makes viruses virulent

    I'd love to look foolish, but in terms of how the pandemic proceeds...I doubt it. I've said nothing other than what was predicted by the medical experts...and consistently been verified along the way. Some of the social predictions...I was actually dead wrong thinking the hoarding behavior would be short-lived. I still hope that it tones down to manageable in, say, another week, but I've also read an argument that hoarding behavior has its own self-sustaining aspect. The violence...should the tensions last, is it really a reach to expect more of it?

    I'd also argue that America's not been in a leadership role in medicine for a couple decades. Our health care system ranks as one of the worst among the developed nations...I believe it's pretty consistently last among the G20. One company already got caught by trying for a special designation for a Covid trial drug; the designation is intended for rare diseases with <200,000 cases. It gives a monopoly for several years. Yes, well, Covid fits that...for now. It's not going to *stay* that way. The company argued they wanted it to get fast-track permission for testing...which would be a side effect, but still, that's a very convenient story too. Still, I trust Big Pharma about as far as I can throw them...not at all. (There are PLENTY of other examples, like Epi-Pens, where the price they charge is beyond ludicrous.) So, ok, maybe they'll get something done, but they're gonna look to gouge as much as they can in the process.
    xevious likes this.
    The truth is rarely pure and never simple.

    Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest

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