What you consider the modern equivalent of the Submariner
Like Tree176Likes

Thread: What you consider the modern equivalent of the Submariner

Page 1 of 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 90
  1. #1
    Member Tyler Armstrong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    135

    What you consider the modern equivalent of the Submariner

    Strictly tool watch, what a person sixty years ago would have bought a Submariner for. So, what would the modern equivalent be?

    Tudor Pelagos, Citizen Promaster?
    6tffd likes this.
    Omega Seamaster 300m 2018 Blue
    Omega Speedmaster Hesalite
    Rolex Explorer
    G-Shock DW5600E


  2. #2
    Member ds760476's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,499

    Re: What you consider the modern equivalent of the Submariner

    so a nice, but not too nice, dive watch? Maybe a Sinn?
    Rolex 16600 Seadweller | DOXA 750T Sharkhunter | Seiko STO Turtle | GShock DW5600

  3. #3
    Member VanAdian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Canada,US
    Posts
    374

    Re: What you consider the modern equivalent of the Submariner

    So we are assuming this guy is no longer a tool watch?

    solar g-shocker likes this.


  4. Remove Advertisements
    WatchUSeek.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Bristol, RI USA
    Posts
    253
    I don’t think he is saying that your subbie can’t perform as a tool watch, but majority would not use it as one. I have the same watch but I don’t wear it to work on cars, shoot guns, etc. For me a modern tool watch would be a G-shock or similar type watch.
    ctlawyer, soukchai and Estilo like this.

  6. #5
    Member VanAdian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Canada,US
    Posts
    374

    Re: What you consider the modern equivalent of the Submariner

    Quote Originally Posted by Msiekierski View Post
    I don’t think he is saying that your subbie can’t perform as a tool watch, but majority would not use it as one. I have the same watch but I don’t wear it to work on cars, shoot guns, etc. For me a modern tool watch would be a G-shock or similar type watch.
    What you are describing sounds to me like a beater.

    Problem is nowadays- in contrast to OPs 60 year ago reference- all tool functionality of mechanical watches is obsolete given quartz, cell phones, dive computers, etc. These would all be the modern day equivalents if tool watches.

    Semantics aside I still think the current 114060 is true to its original intent (having owned both the 14060 and 114060) - with the added benefit of a luxury interpretation. How you choose to wear it and experience it will define its “toolines”.
    KiwiWomble and Davidka like this.


  7. #6
    Member JLS36's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    2,863

    Re: What you consider the modern equivalent of the Submariner

    Monta, they have worked hard to take what Rolex is and was and make a spin on that and make it more affordable. My other opinion is that it wouldn't be a single model or brand. That being said I think the extremely robust world of microbrand divers could be the new it. Nth, raven, halios, eza and loads of others.

    Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk

  8. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    3,587

    Re: What you consider the modern equivalent of the Submariner

    I just dont think people 60years ago, or ever subsequently, bought a Rolex Sub to be a 'strictly tool watch' (unless you include the issued rare Milsubs). People bought their sub to be their watch - often their only watch - that they could wear for work and play - the Sub set the benchmark then and still does as a watch that could do it all for the lifetime of the wearer. It has now moved into the 'luxury market' and is a veblen good - but it remains a tool fit for purpose as a professional tool dive watch and every day anywhere wearer. If I could afford them, and found them, I would have bought both my sons a Sub for their 21st and they would never need another watch, whatever or wherever for the rest of their lives.
    EHV, DaveandStu and SOGDIVER like this.
    "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose" Jim Elliot - Missionary, Martyr

  9. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    690

    Re: What you consider the modern equivalent of the Submariner

    Quote Originally Posted by Tyler Armstrong View Post
    Strictly tool watch, what a person sixty years ago would have bought a Submariner for. So, what would the modern equivalent be?

    Tudor Pelagos, Citizen Promaster?
    Seiko MM300 Marinemaster, or recently Prospex series is THE tool dive watch for me. Current incarnation is Seiko Prospex SBDX023 / SLA021J.

    You can also consider Omega PO 600mm 43.5mm case if you want to go premium.

    Doxa, Squale and Sinn are few coming to my mind. For budget diver there are lots of microbrands available with some awsome watches to choose from.


  10. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    San Clemente, CA
    Posts
    2,175

    Re: What you consider the modern equivalent of the Submariner

    Buy a new Rolex Submariner - then worry about EVERY SINGLE mark you get on the bezel, every hairline on the case or bracelet; worry about theft (or being targeted as someone who has $), worry about resale, wince HARD when it comes time to have it serviced - been there, done that!

    I NEVER EVER saw a Rolex Submariner being worn by a diver in the '60's, 70's, 80's, and 90's - not ONE in 750+ dives and dozens & dozens of organized "Dive Trips". Hell, it was expensive back then compared to the alternatives - my 1st "waterproof watch" that I wore (and still HAVE) I got when I was 7 years old for a whopping $2.50 out of the Sears catalog. Nobody laughed at ME on all the dives I wore it (didn't even have a bezel) - the LAST thing anybody *I* dove with was worried about was their WATCH - unless they lost it or it flooded, in which case(s) they borrowed one from someone else who was in-between dives or who was "outgassing" nitrogen and taking a breather...

    Having said all that, I think that any ETA-based dive watch is a good choice. Whatever cost $150-$200 back THEN (and THAT was expensive for a dive watch) computes to any of a bubillion Microbrands now - especially something that is quickly & easily replaced if lost or flooded...

    Next time I'm down at Dana Point Harbor at the crack of dawn, I'll check to see what the outgoing dive boat charter occupants are wearing - I'll bet that I STILL don't see a Rolex in the mix! My guess is - something "plastic"...
    Mirabello1, EHV, Estilo and 7 others like this.

  11. #10
    Member kelt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Bretagne/Cote d'Azur, France
    Posts
    1,424

    Re: What you consider the modern equivalent of the Submariner

    In 1972 I bought one of the cheapest serious dive watch available then, a 5512 two liner, I had appreciated the quality and efficiency of the Rolex submariner while in the Army. I have used that watch for work as commercial diver until retirement in 2003 and leisure after.
    Attached Images Attached Images

    Last edited by kelt; 4 Weeks Ago at 22:15.
    Simon, VanAdian, Avo and 23 others like this.

Page 1 of 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Similar Threads

    1. What you use to clean inside of the watch crystal?
      By harry-g in forum Watchmaking
      Replies: 5
      Last Post: August 6th, 2011, 18:26
    2. Replies: 3
      Last Post: June 28th, 2011, 17:12
    3. Replies: 3
      Last Post: September 8th, 2010, 23:42
    4. What is the Breitling equivalent to the PO?
      By EAT 2824 in forum Breitling
      Replies: 17
      Last Post: September 17th, 2009, 15:33
    5. What is the Swiss equivalent of the SUMO?
      By skyworker in forum Seiko
      Replies: 15
      Last Post: October 4th, 2007, 17:00

    Tags for this Thread

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •