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  1. #1
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    Oysterquartz

    I have been half wanting to pick up an Oysterquartz for some time, but never sufficiently motivated to actually do so.

    I just came across this article about a rare prototype version with a perpetual calendar that I have known about for some time (and which has been mentioned on these pages before), and I thought I would share it. Compared to the information heretofore available about these unusual HAQs, this article, with nice, clear pictures and descriptions, is a revelation. Now, if one of these things ever came my way, I would sell my first born son to buy the thing.

    https://www.revolution.watch/rare-fi...-oysterquartz/
    ronalddheld likes this.
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    Re: Oysterquartz

    Noob Q: Are Oysterquartz movements thermocompensated?

  3. #3
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    Re: Oysterquartz

    Quote Originally Posted by tomchicago View Post
    Noob Q: Are Oysterquartz movements thermocompensated?
    From the COSC Standards (BOLD mine):

    The COSC also certifies quartz chronometers. Since no international standard currently applies to the electronic quartz watch, the COSC has established a test requirement for quartz chronometers based on the ISO 3159 standard. This prescription that certifies their performance as it does for the mechanical chronometer.
    In absolute terms, a quartz movement is more precise than a mechanical movement. In reality, quartz is more inconstant, because it is very sensitive to temperature and humidity, which can significantly alter its operational regularity. High quality quartz is therefore equipped to adjust automatically to the frequency of the oscillator according to the ambient conditions. It must be encapsulated in an absolutely watertight manner so as not to be sensitive to moisture.

    To take into account the technological characteristics of these products, the COSC has adapted its tests and the precision requirements. To acquire the COSC label, a quartz instrument must benefit from thermo-compensation and rigorous encapsulation. Each quartz chronometer is tested for 13 days, in one position, at 3 different temperatures and 4 different relative humidity levels. The criteria are less numerous, but the tolerance levels are much more stringent.


    So... since the OysterQuartz in question is certified as a chronometer, it must be thermo-compensated.

    HTH
    tomchicago likes this.
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  5. #4
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    Re: Oysterquartz

    Quote Originally Posted by tomchicago View Post
    Noob Q: Are Oysterquartz movements thermocompensated?
    Yes, they are. And whilst I don't believe Rolex ever gave a factory spec for their accuracy, the movements did meet the (old) COSC quartz chronometer spec.
    The 4.19 MHz Collection
    Casio - SP-400, module 75
    Casio - SP-410, module 75
    Casio - SP-400G, module 75
    Citizen - Crystron 4 Mega, cal. 7370
    Citizen - Exceed 4 Mega, cal. 1730 SOLD
    Junghans - Prototype, cal. 667.20
    Junghans - MegaQuarz, cal. 667.26 SOLD
    Omega - Prototype, cal. 1522

  6. #5
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    Re: Oysterquartz

    I guess if Rolex would assure me that they would service and maintain this watch for me as long as I owned it, I might buy it. Otherwise it probably would be best kept in a Rolex museum, or with the guy that designed and built it.

  7. #6
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    Re: Oysterquartz

    Quote Originally Posted by wbird View Post
    I guess if Rolex would assure me that they would service and maintain this watch for me as long as I owned it, I might buy it. Otherwise it probably would be best kept in a Rolex museum, or with the guy that designed and built it.
    Given their previous effort to claim ownership of the prototype Oysterquartz that went to auction, I would be far too concerned about Rolex just keeping the watch if ever I sent it back for servicing. I would probably want to find a highly proficient watch service chap with Oysterquartz experience.
    The 4.19 MHz Collection
    Casio - SP-400, module 75
    Casio - SP-410, module 75
    Casio - SP-400G, module 75
    Citizen - Crystron 4 Mega, cal. 7370
    Citizen - Exceed 4 Mega, cal. 1730 SOLD
    Junghans - Prototype, cal. 667.20
    Junghans - MegaQuarz, cal. 667.26 SOLD
    Omega - Prototype, cal. 1522

  8. #7
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    Re: Oysterquartz

    Quote Originally Posted by gaijin View Post
    From the COSC Standards (BOLD mine):

    The COSC also certifies quartz chronometers. Since no international standard currently applies to the electronic quartz watch, the COSC has established a test requirement for quartz chronometers based on the ISO 3159 standard. This prescription that certifies their performance as it does for the mechanical chronometer.
    In absolute terms, a quartz movement is more precise than a mechanical movement. In reality, quartz is more inconstant, because it is very sensitive to temperature and humidity, which can significantly alter its operational regularity. High quality quartz is therefore equipped to adjust automatically to the frequency of the oscillator according to the ambient conditions. It must be encapsulated in an absolutely watertight manner so as not to be sensitive to moisture.

    To take into account the technological characteristics of these products, the COSC has adapted its tests and the precision requirements. To acquire the COSC label, a quartz instrument must benefit from thermo-compensation and rigorous encapsulation. Each quartz chronometer is tested for 13 days, in one position, at 3 different temperatures and 4 different relative humidity levels. The criteria are less numerous, but the tolerance levels are much more stringent.


    So... since the OysterQuartz in question is certified as a chronometer, it must be thermo-compensated.

    HTH
    You have quoted from the new spec. Don't forget that the old COSC quartz chronometer spec (under which the Oysterquartz qualified) did not specify that thermocompensation was necessary. This is how high frequency watches were able to qualify back in the day. The Oysterquartz line, though, was most definitely thermocompensated.
    tomchicago and dicioccio like this.
    The 4.19 MHz Collection
    Casio - SP-400, module 75
    Casio - SP-410, module 75
    Casio - SP-400G, module 75
    Citizen - Crystron 4 Mega, cal. 7370
    Citizen - Exceed 4 Mega, cal. 1730 SOLD
    Junghans - Prototype, cal. 667.20
    Junghans - MegaQuarz, cal. 667.26 SOLD
    Omega - Prototype, cal. 1522

  9. #8
    Member gaijin's Avatar
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    Re: Oysterquartz

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom-HK View Post
    You have quoted from the new spec. Don't forget that the old COSC quartz chronometer spec (under which the Oysterquartz qualified) did not specify that thermocompensation was necessary. This is how high frequency watches were able to qualify back in the day. The Oysterquartz line, though, was most definitely thermocompensated.
    Do you have a link to the old quartz chronometer spec?

    TIA
    "So?"
    -Andrew Breitbart 1969-2012

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    Re: Oysterquartz

    Interesting. Just looking at the picture of the movement of that Day Date Oysterquartz,where is the battery located and what's the procedure for changing it?

  11. #10
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    Re: Oysterquartz

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom-HK View Post
    Given their previous effort to claim ownership of the prototype Oysterquartz that went to auction, I would be far too concerned about Rolex just keeping the watch if ever I sent it back for servicing. I would probably want to find a highly proficient watch service chap with Oysterquartz experience.
    Kind of my point nobody has any experience working on that movement. He is going to figure it out as he goes along, and how about parts. Just saying ain't no service manuals for prototypes.

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